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Wednesday, June 22 • 15:45 - 16:35
CON04.02 - ePortfolio rubrics: A multidisciplinary, student-centred, faculty developed, open education resource (whew!)

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In recent years, ePortfolios have been identified as a student-centred learning tool that can facilitate high impact pedagogical practices (Kuh, 2008). ePortfolio implementation has the potential to encourage learners to reflect on their learning and make connections between and across various experiences and knowledge. For teachers, ePortfolios are a tool they can use to enhance students’ development of the skills, attitudes, and knowledge that form the learning outcomes of specific courses or programs while assessing the degree to which students have met those learning outcomes.

At Carleton, one of the challenges instructors faced when implementing ePortfolios at the course level was the question of how to evaluate the work students produced. Because ePortfolios enable students to demonstrate their learning using unique, multimodal artifacts, the instructors found it difficult to reliably assess the variety of unique expressions of learning found in their students’ portfolios. The instructors found that already available rubrics were either designed for program level portfolios, included too much course-specific content, or were not open access. In response, our ePortfolio Faculty Learning community drafted an interactive, modifiable rubric that faculty from multiple disciplines can easily adapt to grade their students’ portfolios. The structure and content of the rubric was drawn from existing resources, ePortfolio research, and instructors’ personal insights from using ePortfolios in their courses. Faculty have applied these rubrics successfully adapting them to their particular courses and educational needs.

Participants in this session will work in small groups to apply the rubric to examples of student ePortfolios from different disciplines and levels of study. The rubrics will be shared as an open education resource (OER).

References
American Association of Colleges and Universities (2009). VALUE Rubrics. Retrieved from https://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics

Chen, H. L., & Mazow, C. (2002). Electronic learning portfolios and student affairs. NASPA NetResults.

Connect to Learning (2014). Catalyst for learning. Retrieved from: http://c2l.mcnrc.org/g

Kuh, G. D. (2008). Excerpt from High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter. Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Light, T. P., Chen, H. L., & Ittelson, J. C. (2011). Documenting learning with ePortfolios: A guide for college instructors. John Wiley & Sons.

Presenters
avatar for Allie Davidson

Allie Davidson

EdTech Development Coordinator, Carleton University
Allie Davidson is a EdTech development coordinator at Carleton University’s Educational Development Centre. She is leading the project of ePortfolio adoption at the University and working closely with faculty and students to identify the impediments to ePortfolio adoption, the benefits for student learning, and effective practices in implementation.
avatar for Peggy Hartwick

Peggy Hartwick

Instructor, Carleton University
Peggy was a recipient of the 2015 Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning. She is an Instructor and PhD student in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. As a passionate educator who cares deeply about her students’ learning and success, she thoughtfully blends technology and pedagogy to create safe, authentic and engaging learning opportunities for her students.
BH

Beth Hughes

Beth Hughes is an Instructor in the Centre for Initiatives at Carleton University. She teaches at-risk students in the Enriched Support Program in their first year. She uses pedagogically sound and innovative strategies for encouraging students’ engagement, such as coordinating more experienced students as academic coaches to support first year students in their academic writing and reading
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Samah Sabra

Samah is an educational developer and contract instructor at Carleton University. Her areas of interest are inclusive educational practices, experiential education, and communities of practice. In a past life, her research focused on feminist, queer, and anti-racist theories and methodologies. Her educational development practices are informed by these theories.
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Rachelle Thibodeau

Coordinator, Academic Support, Program Evaluation, and Research, Carleton University
Rachelle Thibodeau works as a staff member in Carleton University’s Centre for Initiatives in Education and as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology. Since 1998, she has developed and led peer-learning programs focused on access and success for underprepared and marginalized learners. She also teaches a fourth-year writing seminar for psychology students and researches the connection between social class, identity, and academic... Read More →

Additional Authors
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Eva Kartchava

Eva Kartchava is Assistant Professor of Applied Linguistics and TESL at Carleton University. Her research interests include technology use in language learning and higher education, effective assessment strategies, teacher cognition, and the role of instruction in second language acquisition.
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Sarah Todd

Sarah Todd is an associate professor in the school of social work at Carleton University. Her areas of study are social work education, youth and gender and sexuality. Her current research explores the impact of new managerialism on social work education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 54A

Attendees (32)




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