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Thursday, June 23 • 10:30 - 11:20
CON05.10 - Lecture Hall Labs: creating effective, portable hands-on activities to encourage active student engagement and small group work in lecture-hall courses.

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Teaching and learning research has demonstrated the effectiveness of cooperative, hands-on learning in student retention and efficacy, but how do we include these experiences in our large, lecture hall classrooms? There are excellent examples of the incorporation of simulations and case studies in the STEM fields but what about the engagement of kinesthetic modalities in non-laboratory/STEM settings.






In order to explore this challenge, we engaged first year Anthropology students with several activities we colloquially named “labs-in-a-bag,” Each lab was contained entirely in a large Ziploc bag, attached to a clipboard. Working in small groups, at their seats within the lecture hall, students worked through the activities. These labs were used at transitional phases within the larger curriculum to have students connect major concepts that would be introduced in the following class.


In this interactive workshop, participants will learn about the benefits and discuss the challenges of incorporating portable, hands-on, cooperative learning activities in large, lecture-hall classes. The goal of the workshop is to stimulate creative construction of hands-on learning materials that are inexpensive, portable, practical, encourage peer engagement and unique to individual disciplines.






In small groups, participants will examine model “portable labs”, design their own activities, and exchange and circulate those activities in order to strategize methods for overcoming instructional obstacles such as conveying clear instructions, and dealing with limited physical spaces. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to 1) articulate the benefits of using hands-on learning materials in large, lecture hall classrooms; 2) transfer the concept and benefits of portable labs to their own discipline-specific practice and 3) construct their own simple portable lab activities.


Teaching and learning research has demonstrated the effectiveness of co-operative, hands-on learning in student retention and efficacy, but how do we include these experiences in our large, lecture hall classrooms? There are excellent examples of the incorporation of simulations and case studies in the STEM fields but what about engagement of kinesthetic modalities in non-laboratory/STEM settings.


In order to explore this challenge, we engaged first year Anthropology students with several activities we colloquially named “labs-in-a-bag,” Each lab was contained entirely in a large Ziploc bag, attached to a clip board. Working in small groups, at their seats within the lecture hall, students worked through the activities. These labs were used at transitional phases within the larger curriculum to have students connect major concepts that would be introduced in the following class.


In this interactive workshop, participants will learn about the benefits and discuss the challenges of incorporating portable, hands-on, co-operative learning activities in large, lecture-hall classes. The goal of the workshop is to stimulate creative construction of hands-on learning materials that are inexpensive, portable, practical, encourage peer engagement and unique to individual disciplines.


In small groups, participants will examine model “portable labs”, design their own activities, and exchange and circulate those activities in order to strategize methods for overcoming instructional obstacles such as conveying clear instructions, and dealing with limited physical spaces. By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to 1) articulate the benefits of using hands-on learning materials in large, lecture hall classrooms; 2) transfer the concept and benefits of portable labs to their own discipline-specific practice; and 3) construct their own simple portable lab activities.

Presenters
ZM

Zoe Morris

Dr. Zoe Morris is a recent graduate from the Department of Anthropology at Western University. She has worked with the TSC for over five years as an instructor for several graduate student teaching and learning programs. Her pedagogical interests include incorporating hands-on activities in large classes and encouraging undergraduate student self-reflective identification of professional skill development.


Thursday June 23, 2016 10:30 - 11:20
UCC 65

Attendees (30)




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