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Monday, June 20
 

09:00

STLHE Board of Directors Meeting
Monday June 20, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Ontario Hall 230 Sarnia Road, London ON

10:00

16:00

Registration
Times approximate, exact location TBA

Monday June 20, 2016 16:00 - 19:00
Ontario Hall 230 Sarnia Road, London ON

17:00

 
Tuesday, June 21
 

07:30

08:30

Welcome & Panel Discussion: Empowering Learners and Effecting Change by Creating Pathways
Stakeholders of higher education are best able to empower learners and effect change when different institutions work together in the best interests of students. As colleges, CEGEPs, universities, and institutes, we can learn from each other, and from our students’ experiences of us. Conversations about the prevalence and steady growth of pathway and transfer activity among post-secondary students in Canada reflect the future of an innovative, responsive, accessible, and student-centred education system; they allow us to understand our students, their backgrounds, and diverse educational contexts; and they encourage us to reflect on how teaching and learning practices develop across institutions. 


Presenters
AM

Anne Marie DeCicco-Best

Former Mayor of London and Fanshawe's Government Relations Specialist
RS

Rachel Schousten

Weather Network Morning Show Host
KS

Katie Simpson

CBC Parliamentary Correspondent
GV

Glenn Vollebregt

St. Lawrence College President


Tuesday June 21, 2016 08:30 - 09:45
D1060 Fanshawe College

08:30

08:30

3M National Student Fellows Retreat
Tuesday June 21, 2016 08:30 - 16:00
M3045 Fanshawe College

09:00

09:45

10:00

PRE-CON.A.01 - Exhilarated Teaching/Exhilarated Learning
What does it take to bring the fun, the enjoyment, the sheer joy of teaching and learning back to your courses? Perhaps it starts with you. This pre-conference workshop has two core objectives: re-energizing participants and sharing three foundational approaches to engage students. By experiencing foundational practices and developing a plan using the ALIVE model, you will be equipped to enhance your mindfulness, energy, relationships, purpose, and joy.

As Goleman (2013) has shown, in today’s fast-moving world, it’s easy to become distracted, isolated and overwhelmed. Yet, focus is integral to happiness, productivity and relationships. Paying attention is essential for completing the rigors of academic life. We will begin with mindfulness practices as a foundation. Participants will work individually and in small groups to plan how they will enhance their health and energy in key areas and enhance their passion and purpose. You will also benefit from both theory and practice of spending time in nature. Louv (2012) argued that the future will belong to the nature-smart—those individuals, families, businesses, and political leaders who develop a deeper understanding of the transformative power of the natural world and who balance the virtual with the real. He noted that the more high-tech we become, the more nature we need. Some key research findings about the benefits of nature will be shared. There will be a nature exploration completed in partners. The final component towards the first objective will involve the importance of enjoyment and focus on ten core positive emotions (Frederickson, 2009) and how to get more of them throughout each week.

By experiencing essential approaches to forging a dynamic environment, (e.g., human connection, whole body learning, and connecting content with context) you will leave with new approaches to inspire, encourage, and uplift students.

Presenters
avatar for William B. Strean

William B. Strean

Professor & 3M National Teaching Fellow, University of Alberta
Billy Strean, Ph.D., is Professor and 3M National Teaching Fellow in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Alberta.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 10:00 - 12:00
M3017 Fanshawe College

10:00

PRE-CON.A.02 - Evaluation Mapping: An Interactive Workshop to Create Alignments in Your Course
The Evaluation Mapping Tool was designed at Fanshawe College to support faculty in course design and development incorporating alignments of vocational learning outcomes, course learning outcomes, level of skill, domain (cognitive, affective, psychomotor), and the corresponding evaluation and weighting of evaluation. This tool was developed in support of the longstanding trend in Ontario, and indeed globally, toward outcome-based education that promotes learning towards those identified outcomes created with student success in mind.

Outcome-based education has a long, extensive history dating back to the 1950’s (King & Evans, 1991). It has grown very quickly throughout North America (Spady & Marshall, 1991) as the educational system has grown and shifted its focus from traditional teaching methods to the exit skills that graduates should demonstrate in order to find success following their education. This trend has also grown internationally for the purposes of demonstrating quality related to student success through formal student assessment, as well as demonstrating continuous quality improvement through the achievement of outcomes (Goff, Lori; Potter, Michael K; Pierre, Eleanor; Carey, Thomas; Gullage, Amy; Kustra, Erika; Lee, Rebecca; Lopes, Valerie; Marshall, Leslie; Martin, Lynn; Raffoul, Jessica; Siddiqui, Abeer; Van Gastel, Greg, 2015).

The Evaluation Mapping Tool was developed to enhance excellence in teaching and learning, to encourage faculty to critically assess their course outlines and to enhance alignments during course review, design and development.

At the end of this workshop, practitioners will be able to use the Evaluation Mapping Tool to:
  • Identify the relationship between Vocational Learning Outcomes and Course Learning Outcomes
  • Determine the domain(s) associated with the course outcomes in accordance with Bloom’s Taxonomy(revised) and relationship to evaluation
  • Explain the relationship between course outcomes and level of skill to evaluation
  • Explain the relationship between time spent teaching and weighting of evaluation
This session will provide an overview of the Evaluation Mapping Tool and will engage participants in a mock application of the Tool to a course outline. An overview of the results of the pilot study conducted at Fanshawe on faculty perception and reception of the tool will also be shared along with plenty of opportunity for questions and answers. Feedback from participants on the use of the Evaluation Mapping Tool will be sought. Participants will also receive an electronic copy of the Evaluation Mapping Tool itself for future reference and application.

Presenters

Tuesday June 21, 2016 10:00 - 12:00
M3009 Fanshawe College

10:00

PRE-CON.A.03 - Best Practices in Pathways and Credit Transfer
In this interactive workshop, we will begin by presenting the Best Practices document recently introduced at Fanshawe College to facilitate pathway and credit transfer activities. The document has been vetted by stakeholders both internal and external to Fanshawe and is based on a literature review regarding the principles guiding pathways and credit transfer provincially, nationally, and internationally. It responds to the Ontario Ministerial appeal that post-secondary students not be required to repeat “prior, relevant learning” (MTCU, 2011). Following our presentation, we will facilitate a discussion with workshop participants regarding the policies and procedures governing pathways and credit transfer at their institutions. Finally, we will lead participants through a modified Team-Based Learning exercise, providing an opportunity for participants to apply the Best Practices to a case study. This exercise will simulate how the Best Practices are interpreted and operationalized by stakeholders with varying levels of familiarity with pathways and credit transfer.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss best practices in pathways and credit transfer.

  2. Identify the provincial bodies supporting pathway and credit transfer activity throughout Canada.

  3. Describe the practices and processes surrounding pathways and credit transfer at other institutions, including how those activities are measured.

  4. Apply the principles of the Best Practices to a pathways and credit transfer case study.

  5. Recognize opportunities for applying the Best Practices to pathways and credit transfer within their own institutions.


Presenters
GK

Gabriela Kongkham-Fernandez

Gabriela Kongkham-Fernandez is the Pathways Coordinator at Fanshawe College. She coordinates the development and maintenance of pathway projects and agreements and provides pathway consultation. Gabriela has a BA in International Relations from the University of Rosario in Colombia and a Project Management Certificate from Fanshawe.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 10:00 - 12:00
M3041 Fanshawe College

10:00

PRE-CON.A.04 - L'enseignement et l'évaluation des attitudes professionnelles au collégial (Professional behaviours : how to teach and evaluate them)
Please note: This presentation will be facilitated in French. Powerpoint slides will be available in English for session attendees. A translator will attend the session to assist  with questions and discussion as needed.)

Comme enseignants, nous sommes souvent confrontés à une problématique d’attitudes professionnelles de la part de certains étudiants, notamment, dans le cadre d’un stage. Nous nous attendons à ce que les attitudes qui sont manifestement importantes dans l'exercice de leur profession soient présentes, mais… avons-nous fait le nécessaire pour les développer ?

Force est de constater que nous évaluons des attitudes, sans toutefois les avoir enseignées. De façon générale, on accorde plus d'attention à l'enseignement des savoirs et des savoir-faire qu’aux savoir-être et aux savoir-être en relation, sans doute parce que nous sommes plus outillés pour le faire. Vouloir remédier à la situation nous amène à nous poser quatre questions :


  • De quoi parle-t-on lorsqu’on fait référence aux attitudes professionnelles ?

  • Lesquelles privilégier selon les programmes d’études ?

  • Comment peut-on les enseigner et en favoriser l’apprentissage ?

  • Et enfin, comment est-il possible de les évaluer ?


Répondre à ces questions sera le défi de cet atelier. Pour ce faire, nous proposons aux participants de parcourir et de vivre, en accéléré, les différentes étapes du modèle d’Henri Boudreault, soit de :


  • sélectionner les attitudes professionnelles essentielles à développer par les étudiants d’un programme spécifique ;

  • définir les attitudes choisies ;

  • d’identifier des indicateurs qui permettront de voir ce qui est attendu de la part des étudiants ;

  • concevoir des stratégies d'enseignement/d'apprentissage et d’évaluation appropriées permettant le développement et la manifestation d'attitudes professionnelles.


Que vous soyez enseignant, responsable d'un programme d'études ou encore conseiller pédagogique auprès d'un groupe d'enseignants, cet atelier est susceptible de vous intéresser car il offre des bases solides pour entreprendre ou poursuivre vos travaux entourant les attitudes professionnelles.

Presenters
MA

Monique Allard

Monique Allard est conseillère pédagogique dans le réseau collégial depuis plus de 15 ans. Elle est également chargée de cours à l'Université de Sherbrooke dans différents programmes de formation offerts aux enseignants (DE, MIFIEC et MIPEC). Détentrice d’un doctorat en psychologie, elle s’intéresse tout particulièrement à l’accompagnement pédagogique du personnel enseignant et aux différents moyens pour favoriser la... Read More →


Tuesday June 21, 2016 10:00 - 12:00
M3048 Fanshawe College

12:15

Lunch
Tuesday June 21, 2016 12:15 - 13:15
Oasis SC Building, Fanshawe College

12:30

13:00

13:30

PRE-CON.B.01 (short) - Learning by doing: The collaborative development of a new technological education teacher program for Ontario
Teacher education in Ontario is changing by design and by circumstance. The move to a two-year program means that teacher candidates will spend more time in schools getting hands-on teaching experience, but it also means that students are making a bigger investment in time and money to earn their teaching credentials.

Funded partially by the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities, the Technological Education Consortium of Ontario (TECO) is composed of stakeholders from three universities, five colleges, three school boards, two government ministries and four professional associations, who are working to develop an accessible, professional, and sustainable technological education teacher program under the new four-semester regulations. Given the challenges of mounting new academic programs, including meeting the needs of regulatory bodies, overall declining enrolment, and outcomes-based performance measurement, the collaborative consortium model has been vital to the ongoing development and delivery of this program. In this pre-conference session, members of the consortium will speak about their experiences being part of this large and diverse group, and we will discuss ways in which consensus has been built with a focus on creating the best possible outcome for future students with an eye to the broader societal importance of technological education.

The purpose of this interactive session will be to share concrete strategies for supporting complex inter-institutional collaborations. During this session we will have a range of perspectives represented from many of our members, including the voices of students who have been engaged in the program and now work in the field. The team members delivering the workshop will engage the participants in hands- on problem-solving activities related to the skilled trades, while engaging participants in a discussion about our processes of consensus-building, and academic project management.

Presenters
avatar for Catharine Dishke Hondzel

Catharine Dishke Hondzel

Coordinator, Research and Learning Support, Huron University College at Western
Catharine Dishke Hondzel is the Coordinator, Research and Learning Support at Huron University College at Western University. Her research has examined the nature of learning, including classroom climate, cultural variations in creativity, and experiential learning as related to technology and the skilled trades.
avatar for Mary Wilson

Mary Wilson

Director, Centre for Academic Excellence, Niagara College
I am interested in the history of post-secondary curriculum development, including the intentional development of co-curricular programs and supports to enrich the student experience, and the theory and practice of post-secondary curriculum reform.

Additional Authors
RM

Robert Moulton

Robert Moulton is the coordinator of the Intermediate/Senior Technological Education program at Brock University. He is recognized provincially and nationally for his promotion of technological education at the school, board, provincial and national level.
RH

Ron Hansen

Ron Hansen is a Professor Emeritus at Western University and the architect of the Human Ingenuity Research Group (HIRG). His research looks at forms of learning that emerge from theoretical as well as a-theoretical and existential foundations.
TD

Tony DiPetta

Tony DiPetta is an associate professor in the Faculty of Education. He currently works out of the Department of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in Education and is director of the Centre for Continuing Teacher Education.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
M3041 Fanshawe College

13:30

PRE-CON.B.02 (short) - Use of cadaveric, dissection-based specimens, and digital-based audiovisual modules to supplement “traditionally” taught patient care skills for Emergency Healthcare Providers
Educational literature suggests that a multimodal learning approach utilizing learner-centered techniques promotes a deep learning experience. Moreover, literature suggests that an enhanced educational experience is associated with the use of audiovisual materials in a laboratory-based environment.

In this interactive hands-on workshop, participants will experience a new hybrid learning environment in health science education; a result of a collaboration between The University of Guelph (Human Anatomy Program) and Fanshawe College (Schools of Health Science and Public Safety). Participants will utilize cadaveric-based videos and/or digital images to learn the anatomy of the upper airway and its relevance to basic and advanced airway maneuvers. Participants will then apply their newly gained knowledge by performing the demonstrated techniques on cadaveric prosections and medium/high-fidelity simulation mannequins in the context of specific emergency scenarios.

Presenters
avatar for William Albabish

William Albabish

William Albabish is a PhD candidate in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph. His research focuses on the creation of dissection-based audio-visual material to enhance the learning experience of students.
LJ

Lorraine Jadeski

Dr. Lorraine Jadeski is the director of the Human Anatomy Program in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph.
GS

Gary Sullivan

Gary Sullivan is a Professor of Anatomy and Physiology in the Primary and Advanced Care Paramedic Programs and Respiratory Therapy Program at Fanshawe College and in the Western University-Fanshawe Collaborative BScN Program. Gary earned a BSc in Biology, MSc in Physiology and BEd in science and special education from the University of Ottawa and has extensive experience in clinical anatomy, curriculum design and post-secondary transitions.

Additional Authors
CS

Chris Slabon

Chris Slabon teaches in the Primary and Advanced Care Paramedic Programs at Fanshawe College. He is an Advanced Care Paramedic/ Deputy Superintendent with Middlesex London EMS and earned a BA in Psychology from Lakehead University. Chris is also a graduate of Fanshawe College, where he received Ambulance and Emergency Care and Advanced Care Paramedic Certificates.
DW

David Wall

David Wall is a professor of Respiratory Therapy at Fanshawe College. He has been a Registered Respiratory Therapist since 2007 and earned a BSc from the University of Guelph and an MA in Adult Education from Yorkville University. David has a passion for high fidelity simulation / experiential learning in clinical education and has completed the Harvard Medical Simulation Instructor Workshop.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 13:30 - 14:30
D2029 (Respiratory Simulation Lab) Fanshawe College

13:30

PRE-CON.B.03 (long) - Incentivizing a digital community of practice for the eCampus Ontario Portal
This workshop will explore the conditions that would incentivize users to build and sustain ‘the commons’—an online space where post-secondary educators share common concerns about online/blended/technology enhanced learning, and practice is negotiated in relation to these shared concerns. Such a space requires a high level of trust and consensus among users, a shared sense of “we’re in this together”, and a recognition that people are affected by others’ actions. Within the scope of this proposed community, users would come together to:





  • Share quality resources and processes relating to what works and doesn’t work in designing and teaching online courses.



  • Analyze the impact of specific design features and pedagogical innovations in technology enhanced teaching.



  • Conduct ongoing research that replicates design/teaching and learning interventions.



  • Disseminate scholarship of teaching and learning focused on online/blended/technology enhanced courses.






*Attendees are strongly encouraged to bring their laptops to the workshop.


Session facilitators will begin by detailing their work related to the eCampus Ontario Portal, and some initial findings from a needs assessment, distributed to university staff and faculty across Ontario, Canada. Participants will then be asked to work in groups, generating discussion based on the following questions:


  1. How do we identify and collaborate with existing groups, communities of practice, and networks?



  2. How do we encourage faculty and designers to use online resources and share lessons learned?



  3. In what ways can we encourage the evaluation of technology enhanced course design and pedagogical impact?



  4. How can we encourage research on online/blended/technology enhanced designs, effective teaching practices, and students learning?



  5. How can we nurture and sustain an eCampus community of practice?



Presenters
avatar for Michael Agnew

Michael Agnew

Postdoctoral Fellow, McMaster University
Michael Agnew is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He received his PhD in Religious Studies from McMaster University in 2015.
avatar for Arshad Ahmad

Arshad Ahmad

Associate Vice-President, Teaching and Learning & Director, MIIETL, McMaster University
Dr. Arshad Ahmad is the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning and Director of Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He is the Past Coordinator of the 3MNTF program and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past President of STLHE.
avatar for Janette Barrington

Janette Barrington

Associate Director, Educational Development, McMaster University
Janette Barrington is Manager, Strategic Initiatives, McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL). She holds a PhD in Educational Technology and is actively involved in research on interdisciplinary perspectives on teaching and learning in higher education. |
avatar for Irina Ghilic

Irina Ghilic

Irina Ghilic is a PhD student in the department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour at McMaster University, researching factors that affect student learning during lectures, such as note-taking modalities and beat gestures. Her hope is to work on bridging the gap between applied cognition in education research and teaching practices.
avatar for Liam Stockdale

Liam Stockdale

Liam Stockdale is a postdoctoral fellow at the McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL). He holds a Ph.D. in political science, and is actively involved in research and impact assessment initiatives relating to the redesign of undergraduate courses for online and blended delivery.
avatar for Zafar Syed

Zafar Syed

Associate Director, Educational Technology, McMaster University
Zafar Syed has worked in education development within private and public institutions in Japan, Hawaii, the UAE, and Canada for the past 25 years. He currently serves as Associate Director, Education Technology at McMaster’s Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning. He has published in the areas of identity and language education, instructional technology, and educational practice. Zafar is a PhD candidate at... Read More →


Tuesday June 21, 2016 13:30 - 15:45
M3043 Fanshawe College

13:30

PRE-CON.B.04 (long) - Settle for More: The Allure of Competency-Based Education
STLHE Conference themes of relevance, marketability, mobility and motivation for students, graduates and faculty are objectives for collaboration across post-secondary institutions. These aspirations are often coordinated through competency-based education (CBE) formats. CBE is known by its’ manifestations: objectives, outcomes, competency frameworks, task analysis, employability skills, and performance checklists. Supported by governments, administrators, regulatory and accrediting bodies, the CBE movement quantifies value to learners while facilitating curricular and faculty management.

CBE is based in Taylor’s approach to work-place performance improvement (Morgan, 2006). The subsequent educational movements of social efficiency, essentialism, and vocationalism informed and solidified the educational goal of competent job performance (Schilling & Koetting, 2010). In the early 1970’s McClelland linked individual competence with organizational performance and it is this movement that is still in place today (Balke, 2006). CBE removes the emphasis on institutional reputation as a proxy or determinant of graduate quality and competence, replacing that with careful documentation of classroom and simulation activities believed to reflect the workplace (Calhoun et al., 2011). There have been cautionary flags from the beginning of CBE (Anderson, 1984: Grant, 1999; Eisner, 2005) and the concerns continue (Lurie, 2011; Kuper & Whitehead, 2013; Bynum, 2014), however these voices have been ignored in the rush to implementation.

This workshop will address the tensions brought into focus by CBE: our desire to produce graduates equipped to respond capably in a rapidly changing world and the pressures to articulate, document and assess that learning using CBE. The goal of this workshop is to assist faculty, administrators, and academic leaders participate in CBE without losing sight of other, more integrative, educational goals.

At the conclusion of the workshop attendees will be able to:


  1. Describe competency-based education (CBE).



  2. Determine effective uses for CBE.



  3. Identify ameliorating strategies to avoid misuse and oversights of CBE.



Presenters
avatar for Lynn Curry

Lynn Curry

owner & principal consultant, CurryCorp Inc.
Lynn Curry, Ph.D. founded CurryCorp Inc. after a career in higher and professional education concluding with a Rosenstadt Professorship at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. The firm works to enhance educational services through research, evaluation, operational review, social engineering and facilitation of organizational change. Details at www.CurryCorp.net
avatar for Marcia Docherty

Marcia Docherty

Director, Professional Education, Canadian National Institute of Health
Marcia Docherty has 16 years' experience in higher education, specializing in experiential learning placements (practicum) in the health professions. She is completing her doctorate in human and organizational systems at Fielding Graduate University, examining how practitioners make sense of competence in context. Her research bridges pedagogy with organizational, systems, and human development theories in order to ensure a competent workforce.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 13:30 - 15:45
M3048 Fanshawe College

13:30

PRE-CON.B.05 (long) - Deconstructing Accessibility in Graduate Education for Students with Disabilities
Universities report dramatic increases in the number of requests for accommodation by graduate students with disabilities and in the complexity of the accommodation issues needing to be addressed (Rose, 2010). There are multiple barriers for students attending graduate education; however, these barriers are increased and exacerbated for students who have a disability (Teichman, 2010). Available literature describing these issues is limited in scope (Teichman, 2010, Perez, 2013). Therefore, there is a significant requirement to have a detailed understanding, both quantitative and qualitative, of the experiences of trainees with disabilities in the research enterprise.

This session will focus on the major myths and perceptions surrounding the experience of graduate students with disabilities. These include: the disconnect between training in academic integrity issues and institutional perceptions around impact of accommodations on academic integrity; ability to achieve “necessary competencies” of training programs and disciplines; nature and cost of research accommodations and undue hardship; differences between accommodation requirements of undergraduate education and research training environments; and, the importance of faculty education in understanding complexities of the interface between disability issues and research training. By addressing these myths, we hope that session attendees will take away strategies for enhancing student preparedness for and active participation in their graduate education, which will lead to increased potential for success of graduate students with disabilities in their programs of study and chosen careers. Finally, the crucial need for collaboration among stakeholders across the higher education landscape in fostering the success of graduate students with disabilities highlights the importance of the conversation we propose, and its relevance to the pre-conference theme of “Academic Programs: Pathways, Transfer and Collaboration.”

Presenters
MS

Mahadeo Sukhai

Dr. Mahadeo Sukhai is Canada’s first blind biomedical researcher, and is the Chair and Principle Investigator of the National Taskforce on the Experience of Graduate Students with Disabilities and its associated research projects. Dr. Sukhai’s research interests and publications span cancer genomics, accessibility of STEM education and higher education policy.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 13:30 - 15:45
M3009 Fanshawe College

14:30

14:45

PRE-CON.B.06 - Educational Leadership - Rudyard Kipling and Practical Approaches to Leadership and Motivation
Effective mid-level educational leadership is increasingly challenging in terms of securing learner engagement, meeting learner and institutional expectations and meeting the requirements of higher level learners and institutions. This workshop will draw on the published work and lived experience of Rudyard Kipling to provide a basis for discussion and dialogue on how mid-level educational leaders can address these issues, manage conflicts and provide effective and meaningful educational experiences that will address needs and expectations of learners while at the same time meeting the expectations and demands of higher level leaders and institutions both internal and external. This will be achieved by presentation of a number of common problems followed by discussion guided by insights provided from Kipling’s broad range of published work. At the end of the workshop participants will have insights into different approaches and techniques applicable to the mid-level educational leader.

Presenters
MR

Michael Rieder

Dr. Rieder is the Assistant Dean, Learner Equity & Wellness (Undergraduate) at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University. Dr. Rieder has served as a course chair, program director and residency program leader. He is a Professor in the Departments of Paediatrics, Physiology & Pharmacology and Medicine and has been a Harvard Macy Scholar.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 14:45 - 15:45
M3017 Fanshawe College

14:45

PRE-CON.B.07 - 5 Ways to Move Beyond the Traditional LMS using Edtech
Technology in education continues to transform our teaching and learning practices; and with that comes the increasing pressure of faculty adapting to emerging technology and embracing the ubiquitous possibilities it offers. In this session, participants will learn about applying innovative and cutting edge technology tools that can be used to move learning beyond the traditional Learning Management Systems we use in Higher Education. The result is improved academic performance of students, an engaged community that connects students and faculty, and a 21st-century learning experience that paves the way to life-long learning.

Come to a session that will focus on exploring five student-centered pedagogical practices that encourage interdependent learning skills through revolutionizing student engagement and interaction with course content through the purposeful integration of educational technology. Explore current trends that move learning beyond the classroom walls while creating a community of learning that focuses on student autonomy and choice. You will leave this session with a wealth of platforms and tools that can:


  • Amplify student engagement and enhance the holistic learning experience

  • Innovate teaching through expanding learning beyond the classroom walls

  • Use specific strategies and free tools that are easily accessible

  • Strengthen a learner-centered community


Presenters
avatar for Dina Moati

Dina Moati

Faculty Development Consultant, Sheridan College
Dina Moati is a Professor and a Faculty Development Consultant at Centre for Teaching and Learning/Sheridan College. She has extensive experience of using edtech and incorporating tools that implement UDL. Dina believes in the core value and right of each person to have the opportunity to realize his/her fullest potential through enhancement of strengths and empowerment to reach goals.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 14:45 - 15:45
M3039 Fanshawe College

16:00

PRE-CON.C.01 - The Best of Both Worlds: Curriculum and quality assurance considerations in the development of collaborative degree programs
The Integrated Learning Program (ILP) project was a collaborative curriculum development project undertaken in 2014-15 by Carleton University, Algonquin College, OCAD University, and George Brown College funded through an ONCAT project grant. The ILP model presents an opportunity to offer students with alternative pathways to undertake their postsecondary education through fully integrated university-college curricula designed to transcend institutional barriers and to deliver the learning outcomes of both a university degree and a college diploma in four years. Building from the experience and success of the Bachelor of Information Technology programs offered collaboratively by Carleton and Algonquin, the ILP project resulted in the development of a model template that can be used by any university and college in Ontario to develop an ILP degree that encompasses a college diploma. The template outlines the quality assurance, financial, administrative, and regulatory processes associated with the initiation, development, approval, and implementation of a new university-college collaborative degree program that incorporates an existing college diploma. Through small group discussion and critical reviews of the template, participants will be able to adapt and apply the ILP template to their particular institutions and institutional partnerships for the development of an ILP. Participants will also be able to identify key institutional stakeholders at each stage of the development process. Best practices outlined in the template will be explained and additional considerations for the development of this type of program will be shared.


Tuesday June 21, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
M3017 Fanshawe College

16:00

PRE-CON.C.02 - Jumpstart Your Blended and Online Teaching Professional Development Programs with Open Educational Resources from CU Open
Many educators are facing the challenge of teaching in online or blended contexts for the first time, however, few institutions have professional development resources aimed at helping with the transition to online and blended teaching contexts. CU Open is Carleton University’s online repository of creative commons licensed Open Educational Resources. CU Open includes a set of modules focused on blended and online teaching aimed at helping institutions create their own professional development opportunities. These freely available and completely modifiable modules have received international attention and are being leveraged at numerous colleges and universities.The purpose of this workshop is to equip participants with the knowledge and tools necessary to determine to what extent these modules would be useful at their institution and to develop a initial plan for their use.

Presenters
avatar for Andrew Barrett

Andrew Barrett

External Education Program Developer, Shopify
Andrew Barrett, PhD, explores how well designed educational technology can unlock better learning in higher education. He recently joined the External Education team at Shopify that develops computing education initiatives at all levels, from K-12 to undergraduate to post-graduate. Previously, Andrew was the Assistant Director of the Educational Development Centre (EDC) at Carleton University.
avatar for Kyle Mackie

Kyle Mackie

Director, Kyle Mackie Consulting Ltd
Kyle Mackie is an educational consultant working with colleges and universities, school boards, organizations, government and community groups. He provides expertise, consultation and training on the effective use of technology to support excellence in teaching and learning and community building. Kyle has 20 years of experience working in higher education, holding progressive positions at TVOntario and the University of Guelph. Kyle has a... Read More →


Tuesday June 21, 2016 16:00 - 17:00
M3048 Fanshawe College

17:00

First Timers' Welcome
Is this your first time attending the STLHE conference? At this welcome event, the organizing committee and STLHE Board members will introduce attendees to STLHE, highlight some of the sessions and conference activities that might be of specific interest, and facilitate some community-building activities.

Tuesday June 21, 2016 17:00 - 17:30
Physics & Astronomy Building 106 Western University

17:00

Student Welcome
Are you a student attending the STLHE conference? At this welcome event, members of the STLHE Board will introduce students to STLHE, highlight some of the sessions and conference activities that might be of specific interest to students, and facilitate some community-building activities.

Tuesday June 21, 2016 17:00 - 17:30
Physics & Astronomy Building 148 Western University

17:30

 
Wednesday, June 22
 

07:30

Registration
Wednesday June 22, 2016 07:30 - 09:00
North Campus Building (NCB 101) Western University

08:30

08:30

Plenary I: QUESTions Instead of Answers: A Process-based Curriculum for the Twenty-first Century (Sponsored by University Affairs)
The design of Quest University Canada began with a blank sheet of paper and a question: How do we create the most effective and engaging education for students who will graduate into a rapidly changing, globalized world? Our answer was to center education around the formulation of good questions and the processes by which one attempts to address them, rather than focusing instruction on the delivery of information. This leads naturally to having tutors who teach, rather than professors who profess, and to seminar rooms rather than lecture halls. It leads to dissolving disciplinary boundaries so good questions can easily cross them in a student-centered, project-based curriculum of exploration, rather than a fact-based transfer of information and its subsequent regurgitation. It leads to a collaborative rather than a competitive learning environment. And it produces students with highly developed skills in written and oral communication who are instinctively collaborative, inherently trans-disciplinary in their approach to problems, and engaged in their local and global communities.*

*adapted from my article in Council on Undergraduate Research Quarterly, 2016, Vol. 36. N. 2, pp28-34.

Presenters
DH

David Helfand

Dr. Helfand is a scholar of Astronomy, the Past President of the American Astronomical Society and has promoted a model of progressive education at Columbia University and Quest University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 08:30 - 10:40
North Campus Building (NCB 101) Western University

10:00

Registration
Wednesday June 22, 2016 10:00 - 16:00
Mustang Lounge (UCC) Western University

10:40

11:15

CON01.02a - Knowledge sharing through international communities of practice
The international cooperation project to be discussed in this session relates to a mobility partnership between researchers at the University College of Southeast Norway and Huron University College in Canada. The purpose of the project is to enhance the quality of education at each institution and to develop meaningful opportunities for students and faculty members to engage in short-term research opportunities and international mobility. The need for this project grew out of an increased understanding of the value international partnerships offer faculty, students, and staff. Additionally, it arose from the opportunity presented by the desire on the parts of both institutions to establish and grow meaningful and sustainable partnerships in order to increase student mobility, research, and institutional knowledge. The presentation will focus on the theme of community and global engagement, touching on the importance of engaging students in undergraduate research and experiential learning, ethical internationalization, and short-term research exchanges. What is unique about this program is our focus on collaboration at the outset, including the active desire to maintain open communication, and our belief in a model of having students, staff, and faculty engaged at every step of the process, including travel. This approach also allows for us to regularly check the outcomes and logistics of the project with those will be impacted by its continuation and growth. This presentation will outline how the project was developed, the key deliverables for the funding, and the way in which the project is being managed.

Presenters
avatar for Catharine Dishke Hondzel

Catharine Dishke Hondzel

Coordinator, Research and Learning Support, Huron University College at Western
Catharine Dishke Hondzel is the Coordinator, Research and Learning Support at Huron University College at Western University. Her research has examined the nature of learning, including classroom climate, cultural variations in creativity, and experiential learning as related to technology and the skilled trades.

Additional Authors
JH

Jorunn Hegna

Jorunn Hegna is the Principal of Høgås skole, a primary school in Notodden, Norway. She has recently worked to establish a community of practice among the teaching staff. Hegna’s graduate research used a case study approach to examine the implementation of a new curriculum. Previously she has researched educational leadership and governance.
MG

Marte Gulliksen

Marte Sørebø Gulliksen is a professor for the institute for making and materiality at the University College of Southeast Norway. She is the lead of the Embodied Making and Learning research group, and her research examines the role of culture and craft in education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 54A

11:15

CON01.03a - Incorporating Civic Engagement in the Post-Secondary Curriculum
Higher Education has a role to play in fostering civic engagement, yet liberal arts curricula tend to reinforce the theoretical foundations of course material. Schools can promote civic engagement through debate and discussions of current events, in addition to activities that encourage connections between the students and their civic community.


This session will discuss a recent project that explored the use of non-traditional assignments to promote civic engagement in the Liberal Arts Curriculum at a community college. Examples of assignments will be shared, along with feedback from participants in a pilot project. Participants will also have the chance to review an instructional guide that is being prepared for instructors who wish to incorporate civic engagement assignments into their teaching.

Presenters
avatar for Matt Farrell

Matt Farrell

Professor and Faculty Development Consultant, Fanshawe College
Matt Farrell is a faculty member at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 54B

11:15

CON01.03b - Assessing Intercultural Competence in Short-term Study Abroad Students: Lessons for Educators
The old adage that travel broadens the mind may not hold true for every student studying abroad. While pre-departure and in-country support for intercultural learning can help, some student still fail to develop their intercultural competence and some even go backwards (Hammer, 2012). Using a combination of quantitative (Intercultural Development Inventory) and qualitative measures, this study examines what happens in intercultural learning when students participated in a four-week field school in India, preceded by a twelve-week preparation course on the ethics of international voluntourism. Results found that, while students pre- and post-trip Intercultural Development Inventory results varied, qualitative data gave insights into student learning and revealed important lessons for educators. In an era where institutions claim to be producing global citizens and where a more globalized world makes intercultural skills a necessity (Gambino and Hashim, 2016), educators need to carefully consider how to purposefully develop intercultural skills in learners regardless of discipline (Vande Berg, Paige, and Lou, 2012). The paper argues that if we want to intentionally develop intercultural competence in students who study abroad, we need to know how students view culture and cultural issues and how different students learn differently when it comes to intercultural competence. The session's learning outcomes will include providing an understanding of how learning during study abroad occurs along multiple dimensions, and specific tools for helping students to turn challenging intercultural experiences into valuable learning opportunities. The session will also identify specific areas for improvement and growth for institutions that wish to expand their international programs.


Gambino, Giacomo, and S. Mohsin Hashim. (2016). "In Their Own Words: Assessing Global Citizenship in a Short-Term Study-Abroad Program in Bangladesh." Journal of Political Science Education. 12(1), 15-29.


Hammer, M. R. (2012a). "The Intercultural Development Inventory: A New Frontier in Assessment and Development of Intercultural Competence." In M. Vande Berg, R. M. Paige, & K. H. Lou (Eds.), Student Learning Abroad : What our students are learning, what they're not, and what we can do about it. (pp. 115). Sterling, Virginia:: Stylus.


Vande Berg, M., Paige, R. M., & Lou, K. H. (2012). "Student Learning Abroad: Paradigms and Assumptions." In M. Vande Berg, R. M. Paige, & K. H. Lou (Eds.), Student learning abroad: What our students are learning, what they're not, and what we can do about it (pp. 3-29). Sterling, Virginia: Stylus.

Presenters
LM

Lynne Mitchell

University of Guelph
Dr. Lynne Mitchell has been working in international education for over 20 years. She is currently the Director of the Centre for International Programs (CIP) and International Liaison Officer for the University of Guelph. Her current research interests include the role of international experiential learning in intercultural competency and the development of civic identity in youth.
avatar for Andrea Paras

Andrea Paras

Assistant Professor, University of Guelph
Dr. Andrea Paras joined the University of Guelph, Political Science Department in 2012, after spending a year working at the Asian University for Women in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Her research is centered on questions that investigate the political and ethical consequences of international humanitarian action.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 54B

11:15

CON01.16a - What does experiential learning mean for the humanities: A case for applied liberal arts
The pressure to graduate students with “real world skills” is significant. Repeated studies in the US and Canada demonstrate that employers and businesses want the skills provided by the BA in these areas: problem solving, critical thinking, team work and communication. But how can experiential learning further the study of Liberal Arts? We need to do more than match students to existing employers. Using the tools that students acquire through each discipline we can offer opportunities to genuinely engage with real world problems inside and outside of the classroom by adopting the classic tenets of experiential learning as developed by educational theorists over the past century: Jean Piaget, John Dewy and David Kolb.


The presentation will focus on the case study of a successful applied Liberal Arts degree at Cape Breton University, created 40 years ago. The presenters will explore how experiential learning can move beyond learning by doing. Imagine what an Applied Liberal Arts degree could be.

Presenters
CP

Chantal Phillips

Chantal Phillips is the Student Placement Officer for Experiential Learning at CBU. She formerly held the position of Academic Librarian at the University of Guelph Ridgetown campus. Her research interests include access to information for community engagement.
AV

Arja Vainio-Mattila

Dean, School of Arts and Social Sciences, Cape Breton University
Dr. Arja Vainio-Mattila is the Dean of the School of Arts and Social Sciences at Cape Breton University. Formerly an Associate Professor of Global Development Studies at Huron University College and an ongoing Docent of Development Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her academic interests focus on connections between higher education and community development.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
Weldon Library 121 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

11:15

CON01.09a - Professional Learning Communities in Higher Education: Empowering frameworks for faculty development, educational innovation, and institutional change
Problematizing conventional approaches to educational development, this qualitative inquiry explores learning communities at a college in Quebec, probing their potential and application as a framework for serving faculty development needs, improving teaching and learning practices within and beyond classrooms, and fostering educational and institutional innovations.


This study, part of a Master’s thesis, asked: What does it mean for faculty, educational developers, support staff, and administrators to participate in a learning community at a Quebec College? Data was collected through individual ‘inquiry conversations’ (semi-structured interviews) and research memos. The learning communities explored represent a range of formats, with diverse memberships, goals, histories, longevities, and impacts.


Whether or not you are involved in a learning community, you will be invited to inquire about how they do/may impact your professional development, your teaching and learning practices, and both the culture and realization of innovation in your institution.

Presenters
avatar for Julie Mooney

Julie Mooney

Faculty Development Consultant, Mount Royal University
An faculty development consultant in the Academic Development Centre at Mount Royal University and a student in the Master of Arts, Educational Leadership program, in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education at McGill University, Julie Mooney values the interaction of her graduate studies research with her professional practice, and vice versa, and she welcomes opportunities to engage in collaborative research.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 63

11:15

CON01.05c - The Current Landscape of Learning Outcomes Assessment Practices in Canada
Are you interested in exploring the learning outcomes assessment practices that are being used in Canadian colleges and universities? This session will offer snapshots of the Canadian landscape through findings from a recent survey that explored how publicly funded colleges and universities are measuring, disseminating and using learning outcomes. We will answer the questions: how common are learning outcomes in Canadian postsecondary institutions? What tools are Canadian postsecondary institutions using to assess learning outcomes? And what are Canadian colleges and universities saying they need to further their learning outcomes assessment initiatives? This presentation will provide a window into some of the most interesting findings, including comparisons of the Canadian and U.S. results (Kuh, Jankowski, Ikenberry & Kinzie, 2014). We will conclude the session with some strategies for improving assessment practices in Canadian colleges and universities.

Attendees of this session will be able to identify common challenges that occur across Canada in learning outcomes assessment. The content presented will spark discussions surrounding assessment tools and the use of assessment results, which will be practical and applicable for all audiences. Finally, audience members will gain a better understanding of how learning outcomes assessment practices are similar and different in the Canadian college and university sectors. If you are interested in learning more about the learning outcomes assessment practices currently being used in Canadian colleges and universities, this is the session for you!

Presenters
avatar for Alexandra MacFarlane

Alexandra MacFarlane

Researcher, Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario
Alexandra is a Senior Researcher at the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario. She is the lead coordinator of the Learning Outcomes Assessment Consortium, and she organizes and moderates HEQCO’s learning outcomes assessment webinars. Alexandra has also worked as a college instructor, curriculum developer and learning assistant.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 58

11:15

CON01.09b - Faculty mentoring for teaching and the role of teaching climates and cultures in encouraging the development and enhancement of teaching practices.
This session focuses on findings from a descriptive and exploratory research study that examined the phenomenon of faculty mentoring for teaching at a large Canadian university. This research included examinations of cultures of teaching and learning, one of the conference threads and focused on continuing appointment faculty (full-time in one of the Tenure or Teaching streams). Two levels of inquiry guided our research study: (1) What are the formal/informal experiences of faculty as teaching mentors and/or mentees?, and 2) What are current promising practices, gaps, challenges and recommendations for mentoring for teaching at our university? This study was situated within a broader comprehensive review of the literature we conducted related to mentoring for teaching. Included here was Boice’s (2000) seminal work and Austin, Sorcinelli and Yun (2007) who focused more broadly on faculty mentoring, but there exists only a small number of studies that address the specifics of mentoring for teaching (e.g., Carbone, 2014). Roxå and Mårtensson’s (2009) research notes that strong cultural support within departments and institutions tends to increase the number of mentorship partners who engage in teaching and learning-focused discussions. Our session will start with an overview of this key literature focusing on teaching-related approaches, programs and models. We will then focus on a central theme that emerged from interviews with forty-four (n=44) faculty regarding their mentoring for teaching experiences -- that of the role of teaching climates and cultures in en/discouraging the ongoing development and enhancement of teaching. We will share examples in which faculty discussed the role of such spaces (physical and literal) that pose challenges for faculty of all career stages to enhance their own teaching practices. The flip side is that there exist many supportive environments in our institution that offer opportunities to openly discuss teaching-related topics in both formal and informal settings, and at one-to-one, peer, departmental and broader institutional levels.


References:


Austin, A., Sorcinelli, M.D., & McDaniels, M. (2007). Understanding new faculty: Background, aspirations, challenges and growth. In R. Perry, J. Smart (Eds.), The Scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education (pp. 39-89). Dortrecht, the Netherlands: Springer.


Boice, R. (2000). Advice for New Faculty Members. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.


Carbone, A. (2014). A peer-assisted teaching scheme to improve units with critically low student satisfaction: opportunities and challenges. Higher Education Research & Development, 33(3), 425-439.


Roxa, T., & Martensson, K. (2009). Teaching and learning regimes from within. In Carolin Kreber (Ed.), The University and its Disciplines: Teaching and Learning Within and Beyond Disciplinary Boundaries (pp.209-218). New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis.


Learning outcomes:


By the end of this presentation, session participants will have,


- Learned about one institution’s challenges and promising practices with respect to mentoring for teaching gaps and approaches


- Shared their own experiences of the role of both formal and informal mentoring for teaching that plays a role in developing strong teaching and learning communities and cultures.

Presenters
MB

Megan Burnett

Megan Burnett is the Associate Director of the Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation at the University of Toronto. Megan oversees programming and initiatives in the office and provides support to departments and divisions looking to develop teaching supports for their instructors. She also currently coordinates the Teaching Assistants’ Training Program, overseeing a team of 18 graduate student peer trainers and a team of educational... Read More →
CM

Cora McCloy

Cora McCloy is a Research Officer & Faculty Liaison (staff) for the Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation at the University of Toronto. She supports faculty in all teaching-related matters and conducts research on teaching and learning topics. |
avatar for Carol Rolheiser

Carol Rolheiser

Director, University of Toronto Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation
Carol Rolheiser is the Director of the Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation, University of Toronto, and Professor in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, and former Associate Dean, Teacher Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 63

11:15

CON01.16b - Measuring institutional culture around supports for teaching and learning at Bishop's University: Results from the Teaching and Learning Centre Initiative (TLCI) needs and beliefs assessment
This session will present the qualitative and quantitative results of a needs and beliefs assessment conducted at Bishop's University, designed to study the impact of a newly introduced teaching and learning centre initiative on the institutional culture. According to Roxå and Mårtensson, there is “an established link between teachers’ conceptions about teaching and learning, and the quality outcome of student learning” (2009, p. 547). If a faculty member feels supported by their institution and has a strong network of colleagues with whom to share ideas, they will likely be more engaged in the teaching and learning process. The more engaged professors are, the more likely students are to be engaged as well (Brüssow & Wilkinson, 2009). Furthermore, there is a strong relationship between pedagogical training and development for university teachers and students’ learning outcomes (e.g., Gibbs & Coffey, 2004; Roxå & Mårtensson, 2012).


As a small, primarily undergraduate university, quality teaching and student success are at the core of our institutional mission. However, we had hitherto been informal in our approach to pedagogical development. In establishing a Teaching and Learning Center Initiative, we sought to formalize support around inspired and innovative pedagogy within the classroom and beyond, in research, scholarship, and creative activity.


The following research questions will be addressed:


1) What needs and beliefs do full-time and contract faculty, and academic librarians at Bishop's University have regarding teaching and learning?


2) What is the existing institutional culture around supports for teaching and learning at Bishop's University?


3) What pedagogical development activities and resources are valued within this culture?


Participants will also be encouraged to engage in personal reflection and small group discussion on the institutional culture around teaching and learning at their home institutions.

Presenters
avatar for Corinne Haigh

Corinne Haigh

Associate Professor, Bishop's University
Dr. Corinne Haigh is an associate professor in the School of Education, Bishop’s University. She has served as Chair of the Bishop’s University Teaching and Learning Centre and is studying how institutional culture affects learning outcomes in undergraduate education. Her disciplinary teaching and research interests focus on bilingual reading development.
avatar for Jessica Riddell

Jessica Riddell

Associate Professor, Bishop\'s University
Jessica Riddell is an Associate Professor of Medieval and Renaissance literature. She received the William and Nancy Turner Award for Teaching Excellence and is a 3M NTF (2015). A founding member of the Teaching and Learning Centre (TLC) at Bishop’s, she is acting chair of the TLC and a columnist for University Affairs.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
Weldon Library 121 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

11:15

CON01.01a - Space the Final Frontier?
The physical environments of post secondary institutions are coming under scrutiny with the shifts in learning paradigms, new technologies offering hybrid types of instruction, and institutions using spatial resources more effectively. Emergent learning spaces are becoming less specialized, and designed around patterns of human interaction. As territorial boundaries begin to blur, new spatial models have emerged recognizing that students' experiences are impacted by their physical environment, and that learning is not confined exclusively to formal teaching spaces. Discovery can occur from serendipitous interactions among individuals, whether the space be physical or virtual. Space brings people together, encouraging exploration and collaboration, and, as Oblinger (2006) suggests, we come to accept "the power of built pedagogy" and its role in shaping how one learns, and how we teach.


Liminality is a concept often used in architectural discourse about spatial experience. It is applied when discussing the ambiguity of transitional or in-between thresholds linking perceived dissimilar spaces. In this session liminal space within academic buildings (corridors, entryways, cafes/cafeterias) will be presented as transformative spaces that advance the learning experience. Frequently referred to as forgotten classrooms, these liminal spaces continue to be differentiated from formal learning environments. However, it is important that we appreciate the benefits of liminal spaces which, while offering areas that encourage collaborative work, also allow for individual activities. In keeping with the conference theme I will focus on the diverse range of spaces that aim to offer the next generation of interactive, flexible, and technology-rich learning environments, transcending barriers between space types and uses, and creating environments that support a wider range of pedagogies and learning styles.

Presenters
VM

Veronika Mogyorody

Veronika Mogyorody is the former Assistant Provost, Academic Architectural Advisor for the University of Windsor and was involved with the oversight of the design/construction process for new academic buildings. She is trained as an architect and urban designer, and has worked on projects associated with enhanced learning environments. She is an Associate Professor in the School of Creative Arts (SoCA) and Coordinator of Visual Arts and the Built... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 37

11:15

CON01.07a - Let’s Chat: improving learning through communication in blended and online learning settings.
One strategy for effective communication that leads to improved student learning is the Blended and Online Communication Cycle. The Blended and Online Communication Cycle includes a series of planned synchronous and asynchronous strategies connecting students at the group and whole class levels. Evidence gathered to date indicates that students engaged in the Blended and Online Communication Cycle demonstrated 1) effective and improved overall demonstration of content, 2) demonstrated increased effective group performance on tasks and assignments, 3) student reports of high satisfaction related to support peer support and engagement, and 4) students reported a greater sense of community and connectedness to their peers, the content, and the instructor as a result of participation.


The results provide a roadmap of effective strategies and processes to maximize student/candidate effort and develop effective teaching and learning practices in Blended and Online learning settings. Three specific models will be shared with potential strengths and weaknesses for each model provided in an interactive format.

Presenters
MD

Mark Deschaine

Dr. Mark Deschaine is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership at Central Michigan University. Dr. Deschaine is the Project Director, of the Lifespan Autism Initiative in the College of Education and Human Services, and is a part of the Institute for Intergenerational Relations (CEHS IIGR).
RF

Ray Francis

Central Michigan University, Central Michigan University
Dr. Raymond Francis is a tenured graduate faculty in the Department of Teacher Education and Professional Development at Central Michigan University. Research interests include motivation in blended and online learning, concept mapping, authentic assessment, and global experiences to build the professional knowledge base of undergraduate and graduate students.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 60

11:15

CON01.07b - Blended Synchronous Delivery Mode in Graduate Programs
The Master Teacher Program (MTP) of the Université de Sherbrooke is a graduate program designed for teachers in Anglophone colleges in the province of Quebec. It targets educational psychology, pedagogy, pedagogical content knowledge and discipline based learning. The MTP courses are all given in the Montreal region. One of the premises of the program, is that participants should be able to take courses whether they live in the Montreal area or not. Therefore, the Blended Synchronous Delivery Mode (BSDM) has been used for courses. The BSDM is defined as "Learning and teaching where remote students participate in face-to-face classes by means of rich-media synchronous technologies such as video conferencing, web conferencing, or virtual worlds" (Bower, Dalgarno, Kennedy, Lee & Kenney, 2015, p.1).


This approach was adopted in the MTP because of its advantages: it provides greater educational access, the opportunity to increase enrolment, and a more inclusive and equitable learning experience, especially for those who live at a distance. BSDM, however, also presents limitations in the pedagogical approaches that can be used and difficulties with integrating online students and face-to-face students within the same learning environment. In order to address these issues, the graduate program committee has developed a Blended Session Protocol (BSP). The use of this protocol by the instructors in the MTP will be shared in this session. The participants will be invited to describe the context of their programs, identify the difficulties and challenges they face in blended and online learning, and discuss the elements in the BSP that might help them expand and enhance their teaching practices.


Bower, M., Dalgarno, B., Kennedy, G. E., Lee, M. J., & Kenney, J. (2015). Design and implementation factors in blended synchronous learning environments: Outcomes from a cross-case analysis. Computers & Education, 86, 1-17.

Presenters
SL

Sawsen Lakhal

Professor, Université de Sherbrooke
Sawsen Lakhal is an assistant professor in the Department of Pedagogy at the Université de Sherbrooke. She acquired an M.A in Instructional Technology and a Ph.D. in Administration and Evaluation in Education at Université Laval. Her research interests include online learning, blended learning and acceptance of ICT in teaching and learning. Her research program focuses on persistence in distance higher education programs and courses. She... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 60

11:15

CON01.07c - Encouraging Student Agency though Blended Course Design
Blended learning, which is a combination of face-to-face and online delivery methods, can influence students' perceptions of the learning environment and, subsequently, their study experiences, learning outcomes, and ultimate academic achievement (Poon, 2013; Garrison and Kanuka, 2004). The blended mode of course delivery also poses a challenge to instructors because it requires them to move towards a constructivist approach to learning and teaching (Redmond, 2011).


Situated within action research, a framework that utilizes self-reflective enquiry in order to improve one’s own practices (Carr and Kemmis, 1986), this interactive session will showcase a third year special topics course in Women and Gender Studies, which was designed in a format that reduced face-to-face class time to 50 percent. Participants will hear reflections and lessons learned from the course instructor, students and instructional design facilitator who provided support to the instructor through the development process. We will consider the role of the instructor and the impact of blended course design on student learning. The aim of the session is to underline the importance of understanding students' perceptions of the blended learning environment as an important factor influencing their learning success (Entwistle, McCune and Hounsell, 2002) and enabling agency, and to provide participants with concrete tips that they can implement in their own blended and online projects to help students overcome challenges and succeed.


Learning Outcomes:


By the end of this session, participants will be able to:




  1. Identify benefits of, impediments to, and effective practices associated with designing and teaching a blended course


  2. Recognize anxieties that students may face when learning in the blended environment for the first time


  3. Reflect on how they might adapt some effective blended learning practices in their own teaching context.



Presenters
JF

Jordan Fairbairn

Jordan Fairbairn is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Research & Education on Violence Against Women & Children (CREVAWC), Western University. Her teaching and research focus on gender, violence, and media, with a particular interest in the role of social media and digital technologies in violence prevention and education. |
DP

Dragana Polovina-Vukovic

Dragana Polovina-Vukovic is Instructional Design and Research Facilitator, Educational Development Centre at Carleton University. Dragana’s interest is in enhancing educational practices in postsecondary education. She has published articles in this field and presented at various conferences.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 60

11:15

CON01.08a - Early explorations: using online proctoring services to prevent cheating during online testing
This session will outline University of Toronto Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing’s early explorations in utilizing online proctoring as a method to protect the academic integrity of online exams in our graduate programs. Simply put, online proctoring is a technological enhancement that tackles a wide-reaching issue for many institutions – how can cheating be prevented when students take online exams in uncontrolled remote locations? By utilizing student computers, webcams, laptops, and microphones, online proctors can invigilate students taking tests anywhere in the world. Starting as a pilot project in 2013, online proctoring was implemented in three online tests in order to ensure that: students adhere to academic honesty policies, exam questions were protected, and student identification was verified. Goals of the project were to evaluate effectiveness of online proctoring in protecting the integrity of online high stakes exams while providing a satisfactory test-taking experience for students; and to share the results internally, institutionally, and abroad.

This online proctoring project was a first attempt at exploring this technology at the University of Toronto and is still a novel concept to many Canadian institutions engaged in online learning. Since the completion of the pilot, online proctoring has been incorporated into all high stakes exams in our hybrid graduate programming. In addition, pilots of alternative methods of proctoring (i.e. live proctoring, automated proctoring) and service providers have also taken place in order to evaluate and improve effectiveness. In this session, we discuss the details of the pilot project, highlight nuanced issues that others interested in utilizing similar services should be aware of, describe our future directions, and propose areas for potential SOTL research.

Presenters
avatar for Margaret Blastorah

Margaret Blastorah

Dr. Margaret Blastorah - Assistant Professor Director, Graduate Programs

Additional Authors
FT

Fareed Teja

Academic Information and Communication
MP

Monica Parry

Assistant Professor Leadership Team Director, Nurse Practitioner Programs


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 61

11:15

CON01.08b - Student Experiences & Outcomes in an Online Small-Group Interdisciplinary Active Learning First-Year Seminar
Online courses are becoming increasingly popular and at the same time first-year seminars have been one way in which universities address the challenges of large impersonal classes, lack of student engagement, and increased skills development (Summerlee & Murray, 2008). This pedagogy has been shown to be a highly effective way to improve student outcomes when delivered in-person (Summerlee & Murray, 2010). Could the learning experience and benefits of an in-person first-year seminar be achieved through an online distance education (DE) format? How would students experience and benefit from an online DE first-year seminar? Such an interdisciplinary online DE first-year seminar was successfully developed and offered three times at the University of Guelph. The course used the Desire2Learn platform with a number of linked external features and additional custom-built embedded internal tools to enable the use of small group, closed loop, enquiry-based learning pedagogy (Murray & Summerlee, 2007). Although enquiry-based learning pedagogy traditionally relies on synchronous delivery in-person, the online DE format required an asynchronous adaptation. Given this pedagogy, enrolment was limited to 18 students each course offering (who were broken into 3 groups of 6 students each). This presentation will include reflections from the course’s faculty instructor and instructional designer who co-designed the course, results from pre- and post-course surveys completed by students, and qualitative interviews conducted with students.
By the end of this session, attendees who are actively engaged can expect to achieve the following intended learning outcomes: 1) Recognize the key components of small group, closed loop, enquiry-based learning pedagogy, 2) Discuss the effectiveness of using this pedagogy in an online learning environment, and 3) Identify the facilitators and barriers to learning articulated by students in this course.

Presenters
NL

Nathan Lachowsky

Nathan Lachowsky is an epidemiologist and postdoctoral fellow in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia. He is also an Ontario HIV Treatment Network Junior Investigator at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work.
JM

Jacqueline Murray

Jacqueline Murray is Professor of History, a 3M National Teaching Fellow and Director of the First-Year Seminar Program at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. She has pioneered and co-authored several publications regarding the use of enquiry-based learning pedagogy, and has provided workshops and continuing education regarding this method internationally. |

Additional Authors
NG

Natalie Giebrecht

University of Guelph


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 61

11:15

CON01.08c - Student-directed online learning modules: Open Education Resources with opportunities to develop metacognitive skills
At the extremes, some online learning tools provide learners with resources to sort out for themselves while other tools are programmed to continuously adapt to the learner’s inputs and abilities and control students’ tasks. We developed a series of chemistry learning modules with the middle ground in mind: modules that guide the learner but ultimately leave the learning and progressions under the learner’s control. The flexible modules are designed for stand-alone use or combined in a series and are appropriate for traditional, blended, flipped, fully online courses. The modules are an Open Education Resource offered free of charge under Creative Commons license.

In our first module, we studied students’ learning gains in chemistry nomenclature and their satisfaction under three conditions: in a traditional tutorial setting, using nomenclature101.com when guided by a facilitator, and using nomenclature101.com unguided. In this presentation, we will describe the modules and findings from the study. For the second and third modules, we embedded metacognition elements that prompt students to self-assess their own skills, identify their goals, and then encourage them to proceed accordingly. During this presentation, we will discuss ways in which metacognitive elements may be incorporated into an online experience.

We will provide handouts and a demonstration of the online learning modules. Attendees can also use their own device to explore the modules.

By the end of this session, attendees will be able to (1) describe the key features of the modules, including learners’ choices and metacognition elements; (2) discuss the findings of study on nomenclature101.com; and (3) discuss ways in which metacognition elements may be incorporated into an online experience.

References

Flynn, A. B., Caron, J., Laroche, J., Daviau-Duguay, M., Marcoux, C., & Richard, G. (2014). Nomenclature101.com: A Free, Student-Driven Organic Chemistry Nomenclature Learning Tool. Journal of Chemical Education, 91(11), 1855–1859. http://doi.org/10.1021/ed500353a

Flynn, A. B., & Ogilvie, W. W. (2015). Mechanisms before Reactions: A Mechanistic Approach to the Organic Chemistry Curriculum Based on Patterns of Electron Flow. Journal of Chemical Education, 92(5), 803–810. http://doi.org/10.1021/ed500284d

Stoyanovich, C., Gandhi, A., & Flynn, A. B. (2015). Acid–Base Learning Outcomes for Students in an Introductory Organic Chemistry Course. Journal of Chemical Education, 92(2), 220–229. http://doi.org/10.1021/ed5003338

Presenters
avatar for Alison Flynn

Alison Flynn

Associate Professor, University of Ottawa
Alison Flynn, Ph.D. (Chemistry), is an Associate Professor in uOttawa's Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences who conducts Chemistry Education Research. Her initiatives include flipped courses, online learning tools, and a new organic chemistry curriculum. Her awards have included the Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning and the Canadian Network for Innovation’s Award of Excellence.

Additional Authors
JC

Jeanette Caron

Jeanette Caron, MA (Educational Technology), is an instructional designer at the Centre for e-Learning (University of Ottawa) where she collaborates with professors and a multimedia team to create exceptional learning experiences for students in online or blended courses, and web-enabled resources. Recent awards include CNIE Award of Excellence and Innovation for www.Naturewatch.ca (2015) and www.nomenclature101.com (2013).


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 61

11:15

CON01.14a - Teacher candidates' online math-for-teachers journals: A search for mathematical surprise
The context for this study was a math for teachers course component where the main goal was to engage teacher candidates (TCs) with learning experiences that offered the pleasure of mathematical insight and surprise, to help disrupt their views of what mathematics is and what it means to teach and learn mathematics. The mode of delivery was blended learning, where the online component focused on: (1) investigation of online resources (available at researchideas.ca/wmt) to support and extend face-to-face, hands-on investigations, and (2) online journals where they shared and discussed their experiences. Our study used qualitative content analysis focusing on two questions: (1) In what ways did teacher candidates experience mathematical surprise? (2) In what ways might the online discussion be organized and supported differently to enhance the experience? For the first question, we used Schwab's (1973) commonplaces of education (i.e. teacher, student, subject matter, and learning milieu) as our analysis categories. For the second question, we used Gunawardena, Lowe & Anderson's (1997) five phases of knowledge construction (i.e. sharing and comparing information, discovery and exploration of dissonance, negotiation of meaning, testing and modification, and newly constructed meaning).

Although most of the presentation will focus on presenting the results of our study, we will also show some interactive modules and short videos that were used as a part of the study in the site http://researchideas.ca/wmt

Presenters
RC

Rosa Cendros Araujo

Rosa Cendros Araujo is a MA Student at Western University and professor at Rafael Belloso Chacín University (Venezuela). Her areas of research are educational technology and online learning. She has experience in curriculum development for e-learning and online teaching.

Additional Authors
GG

George Gadanidis

George Gadanidis is a mathematics education professor and Teaching Fellow at Western University. His work spans the areas of mathematics, technology and the arts. Currently he is designing and implementing blended courses for teachers on mathematics education and computational thinking.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
Weldon Library 258

11:15

CON01.15 - Technology-Enhanced Instruction and the Flipped Classroom: The Key to Active Learning in the College Classroom
The use of iPads and iBooks in place of lectures, in a flipped classroom, can allow educators to deliver personalized course information interactively. This workshop will utilize iBooks and interactive small group exercises to simulate the technology-enhanced instructional approaches used at Fanshawe and Lambton Colleges. In addition, research from one college classroom will be reviewed. Participants can interact with the material by having an iPad with iBooks and iTunesU apps downloaded. Please ensure all updates for these apps are installed.

Presenters
ND

Nicole Domonchuk

Coordinator & Professor, Lambton College
Nicole Domonchuk, EdD BCBA is a professor in the Autism and Behavioural Science Graduate Certificate Program at Lambton College. She has also recently completed the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership program at Western University.
avatar for Carmen Hall

Carmen Hall

Coordinator, Autism & Behavioural Science Graduate Certificate, Fanshawe College
Carmen Hall, MC, CCC, BCBA, PhD Student, is a coordinator and professorin the Autism and Behavioural Science Graduate Certificate Program at Fanshawe College. Carmen’s passion for technology has been fostered with the iPad as a college instructor teaching with the iPad in a flipped classroom.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 66 (WALS, Sponsored by Nelson)

11:15

CON01.06a - Using Student Generated Digital Images in Chemistry Laboratory Reports
Students in our Foundation of Chemistry course were given the opportunity to make a photographic record of their laboratory work, and were encouraged to include these in their laboratory report. Previous researchers have used digital images to explain a procedure (Benedict, 2012), or to produce alternative laboratory reports (Olivas, 2013). The intention of this project was to use digital images to offer a visual reminder of work done, in order to encourage clear and accurate recording of observations, both quantitative and qualitative, and allow for a deeper level of reflection as they prepare their laboratory report..


The digital images themselves were not directly assessed, but were useful for determining students’ technical abilities with the instruments, allowing for targeted instruction where needed. Some correlation was found between the correct reporting of accuracy and the use of image. The images also proved useful in overcoming student observation bias.


This session will focus on three parts: First, the logistics of enabling students to submit laboratory reports that include pictures. Second, a review of initial results on the impact this new methodology had on the students. Third, an interactive discussion with participants on how to improve this methodology and other methods that could be used to improve the reflectiveness of students in the preparation of their laboratory report.


Benedict, L., & Pence, H. E. (2012). Teaching Chemistry Using Student-Created Videos and Photo Blogs Accessed with Smartphones and Two-Dimensional Barcodes. Journal of Chemical Education, 89(4), 492–496. http://doi.org/10.1021/ed2005399


Olivas, D. (2013). Storytelling Filmmaking. Science Scope, (January), 14–18.

Presenters
avatar for Eric Villeneuve

Eric Villeneuve

Lecturer, University and Employment Preparation Department, Thompson Rivers University
Eric Villeneuve, Lecturer, University an Employment Preparation Department, Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 59

11:15

CON01.06b - Innovation-Enabled Graduates as an Undergraduate Program Level Attribute
We explore in this session our initial research on building capability for all our graduates to engage effectively with innovation,the process of creating value by the successful mobilization of new ideas”.

Our working definition of Innovation-Enabled Graduates has two elements:
  • Enabled for Innovation through development of knowledge, skills and mindsets
  • Enabled by Innovation embedded in academic programs and teaching and learning activities.
Our initial research for this potential undergraduate degree level attribute is a review of exemplary practices and research evidence, structured using an adaptation of the Assuring Graduate Outcomes framework. A key goal of the session is to gather input from participants about resources, insights and issues to be considered as part of the review, including
  • interdisciplinary curriculum to build knowledge about the concepts and contexts of innovation;
  • experiential learning opportunities to build innovation competencies;
  • teaching and learning environments that serve as models to foster innovation mindsets.



Presenters
avatar for Tom Carey

Tom Carey

Thomas Carey is Executive-in-Residence for Teaching & Learning Innovation at the B.C. Association of Institutes and Universities (Victoria B.C.) and the Office of Research & Innovation at George Brown College (Toronto), a Research Professor at San Diego State University, Visiting Scholar in the Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation at the University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia) and a former Associate Vice-President for Learning... Read More →

Additional Authors
DA

Dr. Andrew Maxwell

Professor Entrepreneurial Engineering, Lassonde School of Engineering
Andrew Maxwell is an Associate Professor in York University's Lassonde School of Engineering, where he directs the Bergeron Entrepreneurs in Science and Technology. He has also served as Chief Innovation Officer and Director of Technology Incubators in innovative Ontario organizations and as a senior manager in high tech companies.
RL

Robert Luke

Robert Luke is Vice President for Research and Innovation at George Brown College. He is also chair of the Polytechnics Canada Research Group and a member of the Programs and Quality Committee of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 59

11:15

CON01.06c - When Students Become Experts: Engaging Learners Through Distributed Expertise
How can participatory course designs and decentralized classrooms motivate learners, enhance student engagement, and enable learners to build upon their knowledge and skills? In this session, attendees will learn how the learning models of distributed expertise and social constructivism were used in the design of a course on Digital Culture delivered in a decentralized, SCALE-UP (Beichner, 2008) classroom in Fall 2015.

Without a front of room, this classroom offers plural and mobile points of focus that reinforce learner-centred knowledge and skill production through the learning models of (a) distributed expertise, and (b) social constructivism. Distributed expertise displaces the expert paradigm of teaching by assuming that all learners have knowledge to share and informally mentor each other to make new knowledge collaboratively (Jenkins & Kelley, 2013). Social constructivism purports that knowledge and meaning are constructed in a process of negotiation, as knowledge is not the property of an individual (Bodner,1986).


Students produced collaborative process-based term projects. Creative forms were encouraged, and, following Giroux’s (1991) concept of “border pedagogy”, both scholarly and popular texts were offered as source materials to invite “students to write, speak, and listen in a language in which meaning becomes multi-accentual, dispersed, and resists permanent closure” (p. 52).


In this presentation, participants will learn about outcomes of term projects from two semesters of the course in two different settings, and see the effects of the new setting on student engagement as part of a study in conjunction with the University Teaching Centre. Overall, outcomes show that students embraced the distributed expertise and social constructivist model, evidenced by their creative and entrepreneurial projects as well as their collaboration in the student-centered setting. Participants will walk away with an understanding of expert and distributive approaches and will have an opportunity to compare and contrast two sample activities using these strategies.





Presenters
KM

Kimberly Mair

Kimberly Mair is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Lethbridge.

Additional Authors
VH

Victoria Holec

Victoria Holec has a BA in Psychology (UBC) and an MSc in Neuroscience (University of Lethbridge). She works as Analytical Assistant for the Learning Environment Evaluation (LEE) Project at the Teaching Centre at the University of Lethbridge investigating the effectiveness on teaching and learning spaces. Victoria's extensive background in quantitative and qualitative research methods allows her to coordinate the research for the LEE project... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 59

11:15

CON01.03c - The Making and Translation of a Collaborative Community - University Partnership in Rural Nova Scotia
Marginalization has been described by Stevons and Meleis (1994) as ‘living on the periphery’ and this can, at times, also be the experience of living rural. After having worked for several years in community-university partnerships in Toronto, I am excited to have recently returned to my home community in rural Cape Breton. Since being here, I have often reflected on the potential role of a community-university partnership in supporting diverse opportunities for rural youth who are often described as facing increased levels of poverty and risk (Rhew, Hawkins & Oesterle, 2011; Pruitt, 2009).


It is critical to point out that small and rural communities are rich in relationships and do offer incredible connectivity, demonstrations of care and informal learning opportunities (often through personal networks) for youth interested in exploring their many interests and abilities beyond the classroom. These critical learning opportunities, however, are not always accessible or accessible to all. This is an equity issue for youth in rural communities, raising the question: how can we, the community, use processes of community engagement and experiential learning as opportunities to expand notions of possibility and place for youth?


As a co-designer and former project coordinator with the NOISE for Social Change project located in York University’s School of Social Work, it has been my experience that experiential and community-engaged learning improves academic achievement, increases civic participation and supports feelings of belonging within one’s community. Being back in Cape Breton, I’m very interested in exploring possibilities for a similar project that supports community-engaged and experiential learning for youth in my community. This presentation will explore the emergence of a research collaboration between faculty from Cape Breton University’s Department of Community Studies, the Inverness Education Centre Academy, the Inverness Development Association and the Inverness Early Years Group that intends to first explore youth understandings of/ interest in community engagement and then work towards building a community-based program designed to support, enhance and extend notions of possibility for youth in rural Cape Breton.

Presenters
JR

Jen Ryan

Jennifer is an Assistant Professor in Cape Breton University's Department of Community Studies. She is from Cape Breton Island and is most interested in how collaborations between universities and communities can support community development processes, contribute to youth wellbeing and re-shape/re-imagine processes of research, teaching and learning.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 54B

11:15

CON01.10a - Empowering Students Through Transformational Mentorship Experiences
How do we go about creating learners who are empowered to meet the changing demands of the workplace and who can confidently apply their skills and knowledge as they transition from postsecondary education? This session will share the outcomes of a mentorship program that was designed to support students in successfully navigating the challenges they face as they approach graduation and enter the workforce. The program paired third and fourth year undergraduate students with mentors from the community, many of whom were university alumni. The mentorship pairs met over a period of six months for a minimum of twelve hours to discuss topics such as career options, networking, how to execute a successful job search, and personal development. In this context, the current research used a mixed-methods design including quantitative and qualitative data from both mentees and mentors to investigate a variety of mentoring outcomes. Key outcomes for mentees included psychosocial support as well as career-related benefits such as higher confidence in the ability to search for a job, a more realistic view of the workplace, exploration of career options, and development of networking skills. The data also revealed lessons for the design of mentoring programs such as the necessity of good preparation and support for mentees. Results suggested that more successful mentoring relationships occurred when students had specific goals regarding mentorship as well as skills to take initiative during mentorship meetings. Conference participants will learn about the benefits of formal undergraduate mentoring programs and will be given the opportunity to consider how some of the implications for program design and delivery might apply to their own institutions.

Presenters
JB

Jennifer Boman

Jennifer Boman is an Associate Professor and Faculty Development Consultant in the Academic Development Centre at Mount Royal University. Her research interests include faculty and graduate student teaching development. and student learning. |
LH

Leah Hamilton

Leah Hamilton is an Assistant Professor at the Bissett School of Business, Mount Royal University. Her research is focused on investigating factors that influence the social and economic integration of newcomers to Canada.
HR

Harris Rubin

Harris Rubin completed his PhD at The University of Western Ontario in 2012 and is currently an Assistant Professor at Mount Royal University. His research focuses on investigating how factors such as emotional experience and ideal standards influence the decision-making process.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 65

11:15

CON01.10b - Engaging First-Year Students through Learning Skills Workshops
Student Services support, including learning skills assistance, can be integral in empowering learners. First-year students are expected to be self-directed in their learning, yet may have neither been challenged nor experienced negative consequences for a lack of perseverance (Côté & Allahar, 2007). Academic skills professionals can be partners with teaching faculty in student success by helping to build the necessary transferable skills in high-fail introductory courses. This presentation describes workshops targeting fundamental skills (e.g., taking lecture notes, reading textbooks) with course-specific examples designed to promote active participation. Paloyo, Rogan and Siminski (2016) found that a monetary incentive increased participation in academic support sessions by 19%. In the current study, instructors in introductory biology directed students receiving D grades or below on the first test to learning skills support. Sociology faculty incorporated workshop attendance into the introductory course with participation grades. ‘Incentivizing' learning skills has increased workshop attendance by 42%.


The incoming high school averages, and first test scores, of the sociology students attending workshops did not differ from students not attending workshops. However, sociology students who subsequently used this resource had significantly higher course grades, persistence, sessional GPAs and cumulative GPAs than students not attending workshops. Controlling for high school average, each learning skills workshop attended by the introductory biology students was estimated to raise sessional GPA by .103 on a 4.3 point scale. Participants in this session will identify the fundamental skill sessions offered to students in first-year sociology and biology, compare the described program with academic support currently on their home campuses, and evaluate the efficacy of learning skills workshops for supporting first-year courses.

Presenters
avatar for Sheilagh Grills

Sheilagh Grills

Learning Skills Specialist, Brandon University
Sheilagh Grills is a learning skills specialist in Student Services at Brandon University. As a member of the Academic Skills Centre, she helps students learn transferable, foundational skills through non-credit learning skills workshops and individual instruction, and teaches an interdisciplinary Success Course for first-year students.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 65

11:15

CON01.10c - Succeeding Before you Start: Giving Students a 'Leg Up' to University
Post-secondary education has been identified as a major component to an individual’s successful career, security and productive contribution to society (Baum, Kurose, & McPherson, 2013). Students often face difficulties transitioning into post-secondary, most reporting not feeling prepared academically, which can contribute to the development of stress, anxiety, and/or depression (Waters, 1992). These issues can be devastating for students and affect their performance in post-secondary education, which may lead to their withdrawal from the institution (McMillan, 2013). It is important to educate incoming students of the potential issues they may face, such as poor time management, development of poor health behaviours, and psychosocial changes relating to the increase in autonomy and self-directed learning; and equip them with the tools and skills necessary to overcome these issues should they arise. This past year, the School of Health Studies within the Faculty of Health Sciences at Western University offered a pre-university course, Leg Up, to its incoming students to complete the summer before they began their university studies. This course exposed students to a variety of different factors that would ease their transition to university life and introduced them to important health-related issues they would learn in their first year Health Science courses. The modules in Leg Up are formatted in a way to help students develop solid study habits, offer career trajectories vignettes with “day in the life” segments on different health professions, and introduce tips on how to maintain healthy physical and mental wellness throughout their years at Western. This session will explore the components of Leg Up, an overview of the results from the first set of data collection, and where we see broader applications of Leg Up in the future.

Presenters
avatar for Daniel Belliveau

Daniel Belliveau

Director, School of Health Studies, Western University
A Teaching Fellow of Western’s Teaching Support Centre, Dan Belliveau is an associate professor and Undergraduate Chair in the School of Health Studies at Western University. His current interests focus on the interplay between competition and collaboration in learning and how students transition to high education from high school.
CH

Cortney Hanna

Cortney Hanna is a doctoral student in the Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Program at the University of Western Ontario. She has extensive experience with the creation of engaging online material, most recently with her Leg Up program, an interactive online program designed to help students with their transition to university.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 65

11:15

CON01.04a - Assessing Programme-Level Learning Outcomes: (F)Utility for Whom?
We know we can assess course or module-level learning outcomes – we do so explicitly or implicitly with a variety of assessment tools. There is some evidence that publishing and assessing learning outcomes empowers students (Hussey & Smith, 2008), but they might also hinder genuine learning (Torrance, 2007). We also know that course or module-level learning outcomes should be clearly linked to programme-level outcomes (Moon, 2002), but are they inherently linked, or are course/module outcomes and assessment largely independent of the programme-level outcomes? With the exception of externally accredited programmes like engineering, or those few with some sort of ‘capstone’ project’, do most academic programmes directly assess programme-level learning outcomes? If so, then for what purpose, and if not, then what value is lost? I conducted face-to-face interviews with colleagues in Ireland and Australia to find answers to these questions and during this research presentation, I will share my methodology, my initial findings, and the possible (f)utility that my tentative conclusions might have for institutions, programmes, and students. I will leave participants with three questions: 1) In the Canadian context, where are programme-level LOs being directly assessed and how? 2) Should we be attempting to directly assess programme-level LOs and why? 3) Where could this research go from here, at what cost, and for what benefit?

Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 56

11:15

CON01.04b - Effecting Change through a SoTL Fellows Program
As we develop, embed, and sustain the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) within institutional contexts, challenges emerge. Faculty can be discouraged by heavy workloads (Brew, 2010), and an undervaluing of teaching and teaching-related inquiry (Chalmers, 2011). For many, becoming a SoTL scholar also means cultivating a new sense of academic identity and navigating unfamiliar epistemologies, methodologies, and scholarly communities (Simmons et al., 2013). Strategies for actively supporting SoTL scholars and integrating their work into institutional fabrics are thus paramount (Marquis, 2015).

Our team will present the results of the second phase of a participant-led research process exploring the impact of a unique institutional SoTL initiative (facilitator-led Research Fellows) on departments, teaching and learning, and researcher identity.

In the first year of the program, participants developed a collaborative research project exploring their perceptions and experiences of the Research Fellows’ model. Initial findings suggested both strengths and challenges of the program in relation to developing community, cultivating identity, navigating institutional structures, and bridging various campus units. Second-phase results draw from data gathered through responses to a co-developed survey and a focus group with participants.

Outcomes:
Participants will consider a model of SoTL support, including question prompts and survey questions, for possible adaptation and exploration in their own contexts.

References:
Brew, A. (2010). Transforming academic practice through scholarship. IJAD, 15(2), 105–116.

Chalmers, D. (2011). Progress and challenges to the recognition and reward of the scholarship of teaching in higher education. HERD, 30(1), 25–38.

Simmons, N., Abrahamson, E., Deshler, J. M., Kensington-Miller, B., Manarin, K., Morón-García, S., Oliver, C., Renc-Roe, J. (2013). Conflicts and configurations in a liminal space: SoTL scholars’ identity development. TLI, 1(2): 9-21.

Marquis, E. (2015). Developing SoTL through organized scholarship institutes. TLI 3(2), 19-26.

Presenters
avatar for Trevor Holmes

Trevor Holmes

Senior Instructional Developer, University of Waterloo
Trevor Holmes is an educational developer with a background in cultural studies and English literature. He teaches in the Women's Studies program at the University of Waterloo where he is also a Senior Instructional Developer at the Centre for Teaching Excellence.
avatar for Elizabeth Marquis

Elizabeth Marquis

McMaster University
Beth Marquis is an Assistant Professor in the Arts & Science Program and the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL).

Additional Authors
JM

John Maclachlan

MIETL Research Fellow
avatar for Kris Knorr

Kris Knorr

RTL Conference Chair, McMaster University
Kris Knorr is a research coordinator at MIIETL
MR

MIETL Research Fellows

Konstantinos Apostolou, Dan Centea, Robert Cockcroft, John Maclachlan, and Sandra Monteiro are MIIETL Research Fellows, and are cross-appointed to academic departments on the McMaster campus.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 56

11:15

CON01.04c - We are the Process: Reflections on Students-As-Partners in Practice
The three authors (administrator, graduate student, and undergraduate student) worked together over the last year to review literature on students-as-partners and to critique the students-as-partners model articulated by Healey et al. (2014) from feminist and critical perspectives. Much of the students-as-partners literature, and the Healey et al. model in particular, articulates a vision of inclusion of students in all aspects of teaching and learning. We support this, however, we argue that there is an absence of critical and feminist student and practitioner voices in the students-as-partners literature. As such, we concluded, similar to Seale et al. (2015), that deeper reflection on the power embedded in our daily processes and relationships when engaged in students-as-partners work is required. We also advocate for a nuanced version of the Healey et al. model to ensure responsiveness to the issues of self-reflection and power in students-as-partners work.

In this session, we build on our previous presentations at STLHE 2015 and ISSoTL 2015, by providing an overview of our review of the literature on students-as-partners and our critique of the Healey et al. model. Through the sharing of self-reflective excerpts, we highlight our own process of working together on this project, as an example of the students-as-partners model in practice. We emphasize that students-as-partners practices cannot simply be about models or structures. Our practices must include a personal commitment to reflection, mindfulness, vulnerability, and a willingness to change - on the part of all parties.

By the end of this session, the presenters will have identified key elements of their critique of the students-as-partners model as articulated by Healey et al. and the literature generally. Participants will have been invited to engage in self-reflection on their experiences with students-as-partners practices and to share their reflections. Finally, participants will be invited to join in ongoing conversations about students-as-partners practices in the Canadian context.

Presenters
HS

Heather Smith

Director of Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, University of Northern B.C.
Heather Smith is the Director of the Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Technology at the University of Northern BC and a 3M National Teaching Fellow.
avatar for Roselynn Verwoord

Roselynn Verwoord

Roselynn Verwoord is a PhD Student in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia (UBC). She works as a Curriculum Consultant at the UBC Centre for Teaching Learning and Technology.

Additional Authors
AK

Angela Kehler

Angela Kehler is a 4th year undergraduate student at University of Northern BC completing a BA in Environmental Studies and Political Science. She currently serves as a student Senator.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 56

11:15

CON01.05b - Digital History and Graduate Education: Measuring Effects on Student Success
“Digital Humanities” (DH) has become a buzzword in the last decade. Numerous articles address its perils and promises, and a wave of academic job advertisements for PhDs with DH expertise began appearing in 2012. Beyond anecdotal evidence, however, there is little proof that DH methodology makes graduates better scholars or more marketable. In 2015-2016, we conducted a survey of graduate alumni in History at one Canadian University regarding their experience with digital history methods and practice during and after graduate training. Digital history is one branch of the Digital Humanities, and it refers to the use of computers, software, and other electronic technologies to teach, simulate, preserve, access, research, present and publish interpretations of the past. (We use “DH” to refer to the broader field of Digital Humanities only.) This session will present the results of that survey, explore their implications for future practice, and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of the study’s design. Initial data indicate that many alumni report very high job satisfaction, are working in history-related employment, and believe that digital history courses were valuable components of their education. This presentation will also address whether digital history methods empower graduate students as learners, teachers, and scholars. In the midst of what appears to be a major methodological turn, it is vitally important to assess whether new DH methods strengthen students’ education and career prospects or not.

Presenters
MH

Michelle Hutchinson-Grondin

Michelle Hutchinson-Grondin is a Research Assistant in the Department of History at Western University, where she completed her PhD in History in 2015. Dr. Hutchinson-Grondin's doctoral research focused on the history of sexual education in Ontario in the mid-20th century.
LS

Laurel Shire

Laurel Clark Shire is Assistant Professor of History and Co-Director of the Digital History Lab at Western University. She received her PhD in American Studies from the George Washington University in 2008. |


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 58

11:15

CON01.09c - Reflecting on Critical Moments in a Collaborative, Higher Education Teaching Partnership
Collaborative co-teaching was originally conceptualized within the K-12 system and involves the engagement of two (or more) educators in the planning, delivery, and assessment of meaningful instruction to a group of students (Metzger, 2015). When enacted successfully, co-teaching promotes students’ learning and engagement, as well as educators’ instructional development and reflection on practice (Bryant, Niewolny, Clark, & Watson, 2014). Unfortunately, many faculty and graduate students are not afforded the opportunity (via institutional constraints and parameters) or elect not to engage in collaborative teaching, with most postsecondary institutions favouring independent instruction (Fergus & Wilson, 2011).


We are two academics at diverse career stages who engaged in a collaborative co-teaching initiative. The first author is a doctoral student with somewhat limited instructional experiences; the second author is a long-term faculty member. Consistent with Enfield and Stasz (2011), we adopted a process that included elements of reflexive ethnography and autoethnography. We met weekly, and more frequently when necessary, to discuss and debrief about the course and our teaching strategies. By embedding ourselves in the research, we aimed to generate personal insight (Enfield & Stasz, 2011) that would enhance our instructional practices.


We describe our experiences with collaborative instruction, drawing upon critical moments as points of reflection. Critical moments broadly included establishing the collaborative partnership and its parameters, engaging in ongoing instructional planning and reflection, and negotiating points of difference. We demonstrate some of the personal and institutional factors necessary for collaboration, such as shared or mutually compatible professional goals, and honouring of partners’ strengths and expertise. We conclude by briefly discussing how postsecondary institutions can facilitate and/or impede collaborative co-teaching.


Session objectives include recognizing the value of collaborative co-teaching; identifying parameters and circumstances that facilitate the possibility of collaborative co-teaching and instructional partnerships; and considering institutional practices that may influence collaborative co-teaching opportunities.


References


Bryant, L. H., Niewolny, K., Clark, S., & Watson, C. E. (2014). Complicated spaces: Negotiating collaborative teaching and interdisciplinarity in higher education. The Journal of Effective Teaching, 14(2), 83-101.


Enfield, M., & Stasz, B. (2011). Presence without being present: Reflection and action in a community of practice. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 11(1), 108-118.


Ferguson, J., & Wilson, J. C. (2011). The co-teaching professorship: Power and expertise in the co-taught higher education classroom. Scholar-Practitioner Quarterly, 5(1), 52-68.


Metzger, K. J. (2015). Collaborative teaching practices in undergraduate active learning classrooms: A report of faculty team teaching models and student reflections from two biology courses. Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teaching, 41(1), 3-9.

Presenters
avatar for Jacqueline Beres

Jacqueline Beres

Jacqueline Beres is a PhD student in Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts of Education at Brock University. Her interests include higher education, mentoring, teaching and learning, and research methodologies.
VW

Vera Woloshyn

Vera Woloshyn is a Professor in the Faculty of Education at Brock University. Her research interests are diverse and include research methodologies, professional development initiatives, and instructional methodologies that promote student learning and engagement.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 63

11:15

CON01.13b - Models in Collision: Measuring the Impacts of Student Engagement on Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding
All disciplines employ models to develop meaningful understanding and explanations. In the chemical sciences, models describing molecular structure employ an invented symbolism – to visualize the invisible, learners must connect the macroscopic, sub-microscopic, and symbolic realms (Johnstone 1991). Learners of chemistry encounter many different chemical bonding models, each embedded within its own theoretical framework and demanding its own “representational competence” (Cooper, et al. 2010). Traditional methods of teaching chemistry fail to explicitly address the limits associated with various bonding models, making it difficult for learners to integrate disparate mental models into a coherent conceptual framework (Nahum, et al. 2010).

The author has developed a university-level student engagement exercise that promotes the proper use of multiple bonding models by engendering peer discussion to evaluate the relative strengths of different models, and forcing learners to address potential alternative conceptions. Attendees will learn about the results of a quasi-experimental research study to assess the effectiveness of the exercise, including the framework of learning models and teaching strategies around which the study was designed (constructionism, information processing, alternative conceptions, student engagement). Attendees will be asked to discuss and reflect upon challenges associated with the teaching and learning of correct application of models from their own disciplines, the findings of the research study, and implications for best teaching and learning practices. The target audience includes science educators and educators with interest in student engagement strategies. 

Cooper, M. M.; Grove, N.; Underwood, S. M.; Klymkowsky, M. W. (2010). Lost in Lewis structures: An investigation of student difficulties in developing representational competence. J. Chem. Educ. 87, 869-874.

Johnstone, A. H. (1991). Why is science so difficult to learn? Things are seldom what they seem. J. Comp. Assist. Learn. 7, 75-83.

Nahum, T. L.; Mamlok-Naaman, R.; Hofstein, A.; Taber, K. S. (2010). Teaching and learning the concept of chemical bonding. Stud. Sci. Educ. 46, 179-207.

Presenters
avatar for W. Stephen McNeil

W. Stephen McNeil

Associate Professor, Chemistry, University of British Columbia Okanagan
W. Stephen McNeil is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at the Okanagan campus of the University of British Columbia in Kelowna, British Columbia. Talk to him about SoTL, FYE, student engagement, chemistry, maybe board games?


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 315 (Council Chambers)

11:15

CON01.13c - Changing Teaching Practices through Applied Research
Action research became institutionalized in K-12 teacher education in the late 1960s as a method to evolve pedagogical practices. Today action research is being used to empower individual teachers and transform school systems. Action research is not routinely used in higher education to develop faculty and this research paper describes how it can be used to empower faculty and their students to co-create evidence-based teaching and learning practices.


This research presentation will recount a case in which an educator, a clinician and a student co-developed a protocol using community-based action research that challenged a clinical training tradition in ultrasound. This tradition extended patient examination times for student training which limited clinical placements and impacted enrolment numbers. The training protocol was developed using action research (Stringer, 2014) and tested for transferability using mixed methods (Creswell & Plano Clark, 2011). During the action research phase of the project, the student performed a greater number of total examinations than the rest of her cohort and a statistically significant number of independent exams (H=36.297, p < 0.01). The mixed methods results found the protocol group (n=5) and the control group (n=9) performing equally.


This project illustrates how evidence-based research can successfully challenge a long-standing training issue. Not only did it facilitate the inclusion of the student perspective, it also resulted in the unintentional professional development of the non-student researchers. This research presentation will also describe how the action research methodology facilitates epiphanic and existential events that can lead to professional identity development and increased professional capacity (Feldman, 1999, 2007; Stringer, 2014).

Presenters
avatar for Marcia Docherty

Marcia Docherty

Director, Professional Education, Canadian National Institute of Health
Marcia Docherty has 16 years' experience in higher education, specializing in experiential learning placements (practicum) in the health professions. She is completing her doctorate in human and organizational systems at Fielding Graduate University, examining how practitioners make sense of competence in context. Her research bridges pedagogy with organizational, systems, and human development theories in order to ensure a competent workforce.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 315 (Council Chambers)

11:15

CON01.14b - Perceptions of approaches to teaching and their relationship to student performance
The present research program is attempting to investigate the validity of teacher self-report measures. A self-report instrument called the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI-R) (Trigwell & Prosser, 2004; Trigwell, Prosser, & Ginns, 2005) has been modified for the Canadian context and for measuring instructor, student and observer perceptions. We will present data on: 1) the inter-rater reliability of student assessment of teacher student-centredness; 2) the validity of teacher self-assessments by comparison with: a) student assessments, b) classroom observations by a trained observer, and c) course evaluations; and 3) the relationship between self-assessment and the basis for student performance in the course. Our ultimate goal is to develop a more valid and robust measure of teaching approaches and to explore how such approaches are modified in relation to the instructional context. Such insights can then be used to inform the planning and implementation of educational development strategies.

Presenters
avatar for Arshad Ahmad

Arshad Ahmad

Associate Vice-President, Teaching and Learning & Director, MIIETL, McMaster University
Dr. Arshad Ahmad is the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning and Director of Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He is the Past Coordinator of the 3MNTF program and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past President of STLHE.
avatar for Janette Barrington

Janette Barrington

Associate Director, Educational Development, McMaster University
Janette Barrington is Manager, Strategic Initiatives, McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL). She holds a PhD in Educational Technology and is actively involved in research on interdisciplinary perspectives on teaching and learning in higher education. |
JK

Joe Kim

Joe Kim is an Associate Professor in Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University and is actively involved in the scholarship of teaching and learning. He coordinates the innovative McMaster Introductory Psychology program which combines traditional lectures with interactive on-line resources and small group tutorials. The program has been prominently featured in Maclean’s, Globe and Mail, Toronto Star and numerous education... Read More →

Additional Authors
AA

Aadil Ali

Aadil Ali is an undergraduate student of Molecular Biology and Genetics at McMaster University. He is a new student scholar with the McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL).
OM

Olivia Merritt

Olivia Merritt is a Masters student in Applied Cognition in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behaviour at McMaster University. She has completed two years of work with the McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL).


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
Weldon Library 258

11:15

CON01.14c - Design and Orchestration: How to implement active learning and promote collaboration
Active learning is a pedagogical innovation based on a social theory of learning. There is growing evidence supporting its effectiveness to improve learning outcomes and empower students (Freeman et al., 2014). It replaces the traditional instructional paradigm with a student-centered approach that imposes new considerations for instructors. In particular, it calls for instructors to focus on designing pedagogical activities for collaboration and coordinating the classroom resources (human, knowledge and tools) in the process, what is called orchestration (Dillenbourg, 2013). This presentation will describe a qualitative case study that examined the implementation of active learning by 10 instructors (over 300 students) at three English-speaking colleges in Quebec. All instances involved active learning classrooms (exemplars of different room layouts and technological affordances). Participants represented five disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology, psychology and humanities); with courses ranging from introductory to advance levels of study. The study addressed the following questions: What does active learning look like at the college level? How do instructors orchestrate their pedagogical scenarios? How do these orchestrations influence students’ collaboration? Data were collected using a mixed methods approach including classroom observations (field notes and video recordings), student questionnaires and participant interviews. Analysis involved qualitative coding to reveal patterns of orchestration and discourse analysis of interviews. Key findings include patterns of active learning implementation; descriptions of instructor’s orchestration of pedagogical scenarios and how these influenced their students’ collaboration. In particular, instances of orchestrations that fostered collaboration will be examined and discussed – i.e., interactive white board technologies that facilitated making knowledge public and shareable. Implications of this research include identification of the orchestration load carried by instructors. We will suggest guidelines for successful implementation of active learning at the post-secondary levels and discuss how they might be applied differently in classrooms with larger class sizes.


Dillenbourg, P. (2013). Design for classroom orchestration. Computers & Education, 69, 485-492.

Freeman, S., Eddy, S. L., McDonough, M., Smith, M. K., Okoroafor, N., Jordt, H., & Wenderoth, M. P. (2014). Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(23), 8410-8415.

Presenters
avatar for Chris Whittaker

Chris Whittaker

Chris Whittaker, physics faculty and educational researcher at Dawson College. B.Sc & M.Sc. Engineering Physics (Queen's), MSW (U Toronto), and currently a PhD student in Didactics, Faculty of Education at Université de Montréal. Collaborator on consecutive research grants investigating innovations in techno-pedagogy and student-centered learning. Co-coordinator of Dawson’s Active Learning Community program.

Additional Authors
CZ

Chao Zhang

Choa Zhang, graduate student, M.A., in Education. Research assistant with the team’s funded research projects.
EC

Elizabeth Charles

Elizabeth S. Charles, faculty-researcher at Dawson College, Montreal, Qc. Ph.D. in Educational Technology. Director of the Supporting Active Learning and Technological Innovation in Studies in Education (SALTISE), a community of practice involving over 15 post-secondary institutions across Montreal and the regions. Principal Investigator on consecutive grants focused on techno-pedagogical innovations.
KL

Kevin Lenton

Kevin Lenton, physics faculty and educational researcher at Vanier College. Ph.D. in Medical Physics. Collaborator on consecutive research grants investigating innovations in techno-pedagogy and student-centered learning. Participant and workshop leader in projects between Vanier College and international partners: Problem Based Learning in India; Active Learning in China.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
Weldon Library 258

11:15

CON01.17a - The contribution of community college faculty to the SoTL literature
All sectors of higher education encourage the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). Yet the motivation for doing such work may diverge across different types of postsecondary institutions (Hardé, 2012). Mainly in community colleges, as in many institutes and polytechnics, the principal objective of teaching-related research activities is to improve student learning by enhancing instructional practices, with little incentive to publish research findings (Hoekstra, et. al., 2010). By comparison, publication is an important endpoint in most university settings.

As increased support for research within the community college sector develops, the tendency to measure SoTL impact in the university way – in publications – is emerging. Yet too little is known about the existing teaching-related research among college-sector faculty (Tinsberg et. al, 2010; Braxton and Lyken-Segosebe, 2015). Our research addresses this gap by examining community college faculty’s contribution to SoTL. We recorded the frequency of community college employees’ publications, from 2011-2015, in journals dedicated to the scholarly investigation of instructional activities. In this presentation we will discuss our results, including what they reveal about teaching practices and development in the college sector and the implications for colleges hoping to better integrate teaching-focused research and publication into their operational missions.

References

Braxton, J. M., & Lyken‐Segosebe, D. (2015). Community College Faculty Engagement in Boyer's Domains of Scholarship. New Directions for Community Colleges, 171(fall), 7-14.

Hardé, P. (2012). Community College Motivation for Basic Research, Teaching Research, and Professional Development. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 36, 539-561.

Hoekstra, A., W. Dushenko, and E. Frandsen. (2010). ‘Fostering a Culture of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) at a Polytechnic Institution.’ Transformative Dialogues, 4(1), 1-11.

Tinsberg, H., D. Killian Duffy, and J. Mino. (2010). ‘The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at the Two-Year College: Promise and Peril.’ Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 39(4), 26-33.

Presenters
avatar for Jen Wrye

Jen Wrye

I'm a Sociology instructor and co-chair of the Teaching & Learning Committee at North Island College. My interests include student engagement, assessment, community college research. Connect on twitter @foodsociologist.

Additional Authors
WM

William McConnell

Bill McConnell is a Psychology instructor at North Island College and a Registered Psychologist. He writes and presents on student research and motivation.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
Weldon Library 120 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

11:15

CON01.17b - Building a multi-disciplinary research community of practice: Finding the SoTL in our teaching and learning
In this presentation, two members of Western University’s Research on Teaching Learning Community (RTLC) share their personal experiences. This community of practice (similar to a Faculty Learning Community) consists of a diverse group of faculty from all ranks and multiple disciplines across campus.

The experience of being part of this group has contributed to a change in thinking and practice, which both presenters will discuss. Both have also experienced a shift in their professional identity, just as Dees, Zavota, Emens, Harper, Kan, Niesz, Tu, Devine & Hovhannisyn (2009) note in their own experiences as participants of a Faculty Learning Community (FLC). Based on the idea that faculty members are interested in collaborative interaction on teaching and learning within a community of scholars (Layne, Froyd, Morgan & Kenimer, 2002), our regular meetings include vibrant discussions on research pertaining to innovative teaching practices and practical examples from pertinent literature.

The creation of this community of practice at Western University by Dr. Ken Meadows, has generated an active culture of research and participation in how higher education is approached within university classrooms of all sizes. Members have many opportunities to engage, evaluate, and discuss new approaches in teaching and learning in higher education found in relevant scholarship, in addition to discussing specific research projects being conducted with their own classes. These collaborative discussions reveal the complicated and multi-layered aspects found not only in researching teaching in higher education, but also in implementing the new or innovative pedagogical approach.

Studies show that student and faculty learning improves through FLC’s (Cox, 2004). This has also occurred with both presenters, who will share specific examples where the RTLC has directly assisted in improving overall learning outcomes within their classes, and enriched their own teaching.

References:

Cox, M. (2004). Building faculty learning communities. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 97, 5-23. http://www.csuchico.edu/celt/Faculty_Learning_Communities%20/IntroductionToFLCs.pdf

Dees, D. M., Zavota, G., Emens, S., Harper, M., Kan, K. H., Niesz, T., Tu, T-H., Devine, M. A., & Hovhannisyan, G. (2009). Shifting professional identities: Reflections on a faculty learning community experience. Learning Communities Journal, 1 (2), 49-73.

Glowacki-Dudka, M., & Brown, M. P. (2007). Professional development through faculty learning communities. New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development, 21(1/2), 29-39. Retrieved from http://education.fiu.edu/newhorizons

Layne, J., Froyd, J., Morgan, J. & Kenimer, A. (2002). Faculty learning communities. Paper presented at the 32nd ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Retrieved from http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.20.4847&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Presenters
DB

Diana Buglea

Dr. Diana Buglea is affiliated with Huron University College, Western University, where she teaches French. Her area of expertise includes autobiographical writings, electronic textualities and cyber culture. She is also interested in new educational technologies and e-learning. She has been an active participant in the Research on Teaching and Learning Community of Practice since June 2015.
avatar for Leslie Linton

Leslie Linton

Department of Music Education, The University of Western Ontario
Leslie Linton, Ph.D. | Adjunct Assistant Research Professor | Department of Music Education | Don Wright Faculty of Music | The University of Western Ontario | London, Canada | http://www.music.uwo.ca/faculty/bios/leslie-linton.html


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
Weldon Library 120 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

11:15

CON01.01b - 'What Interests You?' Working Together for Authentic Inquiry Learning in Undergraduate Anatomy
What does it look like when learning is authentic? This research presentation will report upon a study investigating students' experiences of an inquiry-based anatomy curriculum and the exploration of such experiences as authentic in nature. Findings from this study explore how students worked collaboratively to foster inquiry-based learning as centred upon one another's interests and curiosities, and in doing so, how their learning came to both reflect and inform notions of authentic learning. At the outset of this presentation, the research study will be explained and research findings will be summarized. Toward the end of the presentation, broader questions relating to student-centred curricula, authentic learning, and student learning experiences will be posed for discussion such that, by the end of the session, participants will be able to discuss potential implications of authentic and student-centred curricular design.

Presenters
LA

Lauren Anstey

eLearning & Curriculum Specialist, Western University
Lauren Anstey is an eLearning and Curriculum Specialist in the Teaching Support Centre at Western University. Her doctoral research (Queen's University, 2016) focused on Authentic Inquiry Learning. She is particularly passionate about alignment in curricular design and the meaningful integration of technologies for student-centred learning.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 37

11:15

CON01.01c - Scaffolding expert habits in novices: A think-aloud study in an introductory social science course
Every field has its characteristic Ways of Thinking (Middendorf & Pace, 2004). A foundational WoT in Linguistics is applying scientific, empirical reasoning to language phenomena. Our Think-Aloud study investigated novice students' mental representations as they approached the threshold to thinking scientifically about language (Meyer & Land, 2003). We asked students to report their thoughts while analyzing a set of data and drawing conclusions about it. The resulting data revealed novice habits of mind that differ from expert-like thinking:




  • Nearly all students jumped into a solution strategy without taking time to set up a mental representation of the problem. In contrast, experts tends to devote a proportionately greater amount of time to representing a problem and less time to working through the solution process (Wismath, Orr, & MacKay, 2015).


  • Many students had difficulty distinguishing between the tools for observing data and the conclusions that can be drawn from the observations.


  • Some students who reached a technically correct solution made comments that revealed misunderstandings at the conceptual level, a finding that is paralleled in the physical sciences (Cracolice, Deming, & Ehlert, 2008).




We made some changes to our introductory course in response to these findings. Our findings and the discussion will interest instructors of introductory courses in any science or social science discipline.


Learning Outcomes -- Participants will:




  • learn a research method for observing students' thinking;


  • consider how novices' Ways of Thinking differ from experts' in a social science discipline;


  • discuss how introductory courses can support the development of discipline-specific thinking.



Presenters
avatar for Catherine Anderson

Catherine Anderson

Teaching Professor, McMaster University
Catherine Anderson is a Teaching Professor at McMaster University. She teaches courses in Linguistics, Psycholinguistics and Child Language Acquisition. Her SoTL research investigates blended learning, disciplinary thinking, and the development of leadership skills.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 37

11:15

CON01.02c - Scale Up or Change Your Teaching? Analysis of Large Classes in Biology
How exactly can we make a large class feel small? How can a statistical model help us navigate this problem? This two-part study surveyed student and instructor perspectives on class size and engagement in an undergraduate biology curriculum, then quantified the resources and teaching structure of these classes using a multivariate statistical analysis. In part one, the survey-results indicated both students and instructors identified large classes as being impersonal and classified using extrinsic qualifiers. Conversely, small classes were classified in terms of the students personal learning experience and relationships fostered through the class, suggesting that these experiences are lacking in larger ones. Survey results also indicate that the perceived threshold of a large class is beyond 250 students. But does our teaching and resource allocation change significantly beyond this enrollment level?

In part two, we will explain how exactly a principal components analysis organizes data of this type, then visually demonstrate how classes around this 250-student threshold are managed differently. The results provide a detailed map of institutional change in teaching structure and resource allocation as class sizes rose between 2010 - 2014 at a Canadian university. In general, some classes rearranged their teaching strategies and resources at this 250-student mark, while others inflated the same resources. But is one method more effective at reaching and engaging students?

Student presenter Ceilidh Barlow Cash will ask you to Think, Pair, Share and surprise you with 100 year-old data about university teaching. The session provides an up-to-date view of student engagement and empowerment in undergraduate biology classes, and validates the use of a principal components analysis for even more exciting questions in higher education.

Presenters
avatar for Ceilidh Barlow Cash

Ceilidh Barlow Cash

Ceilidh Barlow Cash is a graduate of the Bio-Medical Sciences program at the University of Guelph. She was a nominee for the 2013 3M National Student Fellowship and is currently a higher education blogger with OOHLALA Mobile in Montreal.
SG

Steffen Graether

Steffen Graether is an Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of Guelph. His education research revolves around finding effective ways to teach large classes and how to evaluate successful learning. His biochemistry research centers on understanding the structure/function relationship in abiotic stress proteins.
SJ

Shoshanah Jacobs

Dr. Shoshanah Jacobs is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of Guelph. Her research focuses on knowledge translation and transfer.

Additional Authors
JL

Jessa Letargo

Jessa Letargo is a graduate from the University of Guelph. She is currently studying in the Physicians Assistant Education Program at McMaster University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 54A

11:15

CON01.05a - Impacts des formations suivies en formation continue sur les pratiques pédagogiques des formateurs universitaires
Depuis quelques années, les institutions accordent de plus en plus d’importance aux compétences pédagogiques des formateurs universitaires, soutenant ainsi qu’elles ont un impact sur la qualité de l’enseignement et sur la réussite des étudiants. Ainsi, dans un contexte d’approche par compétences de plus en plus répandue, la perception de la pédagogie universitaire a évolué auprès des enseignants universitaires; la formation continue apparaît comme essentielle et même nécessaire (Demougeot-Lebel et Perret, 2011), d’où l’importance de mettre en place des formations pour les enseignants universitaires (Luzeckyj et Badger, 2008). Il importe donc de valider la pertinence de ces formations tout en s’assurant de répondre aux besoins du milieu universitaire. Comme le soutiennent Bachy, Lebrun et Smidts (2010), il n’est pas simple d’estimer l’impact de la formation sur le développement professionnel des enseignants, néanmoins il importe de s’y intéresser et de vérifier les perceptions des enseignants formés. La communication vise à rendre compte des premiers résultats d’une recherche évaluative qui mesure l’impact des formations offertes par le Centre de Formation en Soutien à l’académique sur les pratiques pédagogiques des enseignants de l’Université du Québec à Montréal ainsi que sur la motivation et l'engagement des étudiants (Hattie, 2009). Elle s'appuiera sur les réponses obtenues à un questionnaire ainsi que sur les propos recueillis lors d'entrevues individuelles qui seront présentées sous la forme de capsules vidéo. Nous présenterons les perceptions des participants dans le but de démontrer que les formations répondent à des conditions qui leur permettent d’acquérir et de parfaire des compétences pédagogiques en matière d’enseignement et d’apprentissage (Stes et van Petegem, 2011).

Presenters
avatar for Helene Meunier

Helene Meunier

Conseillère pédagogique, UQAM
Chargée de cours au département d’éducation et pédagogie ainsi qu’au département de didactique à l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Hélène Meunier est aussi conseillère pédagogique à l’UQAM depuis février 2014 et termine un doctorat en évaluation des apprentissages.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 58

11:15

CON01.12a - The Effects of an Argumentation and Debate Course on Students’ Impromptu Speaking Competence in English as a Foreign Language: An Empirical Investigation
This study explores the effectiveness of an argumentation and debate training course in comparison with traditional speaking course in improving university students’ speaking ability in English as a foreign language. An empirical study was conducted in a research university to compare students’ impromptu speeches before and after one semester’s course of Argumentation and Debate with those of a control group in a traditional English speaking class. The results show that argumentation and debate training achieves a more noticeable progress in students’ impromptu English speaking ability in terms of lexical richness and syntactic complexity. This research confirms the Cognitive Content Engagement Theory by proving that with intellectually challenging and interrelated academic knowledge and depth of cognitive processing, an argumentation course is an ideal interface for both academic content and foreign language learning. Pedagogically speaking, argumentation as a course focus deserves to be adopted into university curricula to facilitate language acquisition even more efficiently than traditional English speaking classes.

Presenters
avatar for Jing HE

Jing HE

Lecturer, Fudan University
Dr. HE Jing teaches English Public Speaking and Argumentation and Advocacy courses at Fudan University. She adjudicated many national English debate tournaments including FLTRP Cup and China Open, and international tournaments including North East Asia Open and WUDC. Her research interests include Second Language Acquisition and Rhetoric.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 146

11:15

CON01.12b - The development, delivery, and evaluation of an interdisciplinary research course for first-year international science students
Three important goals of an undergraduate science education are for students to (a) learn to think like scientists, (b) develop an understanding of how scientific knowledge is constructed, and (c) enhance their professional skills in communicating and critiquing scientific ideas (Fox et al., 2014; Russell, Hancock & McCullough, 2007). Undergraduate research experiences have been shown to be effective in achieving these goals (Thiry, Laursen & Hunter, 2011; Watkins & Mazur, 2013). In a new, innovative, first-year program for international students at the University of British Columbia, a large, research-oriented, public university, an interdisciplinary team of five instructors developed a course sequence specifically designed to provide an authentic research experience for first-year Science students. Each student in the course sequence is mentored over three terms by one of the instructors. In the first term, the students worked on discipline-specific modules that introduced them to scientific research. In the second term, the students chose a topic that is relevant to an academic community, conducted a literature review, and wrote a formal research proposal. In the third term, the students completed the research outlined in their proposal and presented their work at a student-led conference. In the first iteration of this course sequence, student projects ranged from measuring the effects of climate change on radiocarbon dating techniques to multivariable optimizations of tin can construction. Developing this course sequence in the context of our new program for international students posed specific challenges and opportunities.

In this session, we will detail course activities and present our findings from a course evaluation conducted through instructor reflections, student survey responses, and student-generated work. Session participants will gain insights from our mistakes and successes and will learn how this type of research experience can be adapted to broader contexts.



Presenters
avatar for Meghan Allen

Meghan Allen

Instructor - Computer Science and Vantage College, UBC
Meghan Allen is a faculty member in the Department of Computer Science at UBC. She studied human computer interaction in graduate school before starting her teaching career. She is currently teaching in the Vantage international program and her current research interests are in the scholarship of teaching and learning.
FL

Fok-Shuen Leung

Fok-Shuen Leung is a faculty member in the Department of Mathematics at UBC. He studied Mathematics and Music at Queen's University before doing his doctoral work at Oxford with Roger Heath-Brown. His research interests are primarily in number theory. He is currently Chair of Science in the Vantage international program.

Additional Authors
AL

Anka Lekhi

Anka Lekhi is a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry at UBC. She studied Chemical Oceanography. She has facilitated Instructional Skills Workshops (ISWs) for the last 10 years and in 2013, enrolled in a PhD program in Science Education to further her current research interests in teaching and learning.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 146

11:15

CON01.12c - Empowering Learners to Bridge the 'Articulation of Skills' Gap through ePortfolio Reflections
Graduates who are best equipped to succeed in this rapidly changing world can adapt and apply their skills to new and unpredictable contexts. But how and when do we actually give them the opportunity to do this kind of learning in the classroom?

This question belies a deep prejudice within our current teaching system: faculty and students tend to focus exclusively on academic content because that is what officially "counts." Moreover, faculty generally feel ill-equipped to make visible to students the ways in which their coursework provides the context for learning and mastering professional skills including communication, teamwork, decision-making, problem-solving, and leadership, skills they will require in their professional and civic lives (Dela Harpe & Radloff, 2012). Shea et al (2014) postulate that, as a result, our graduates cannot present the full range of their skills and learning to employers, often their most important next-stage stakeholders, and calls this gap in learning an ‘articulation of skills’ gap.

Our research project tested whether students who engaged in specific, guided, and focused eportfolio reflections about the learning associated with their course project work were better prepared to articulate their professional skills to employers, six months after course completion than were students in the control cohort who were not assigned the reflection activity.

During our session, we’ll share our findings related to the impact eportfolio reflection activities had on students’ ability to bridge the ‘articulation of skills’ gap. In addition, we’ll share the details of the structured eportfolio reflection activity. At the end of the session, participants will consider how they might incorporate opportunities and guidance to help their students identify and articulate these tacit, professional skills.


Dela Harpe, B., & Radloff, A. (2012). Lessons learned from three projects to design learning environments that support 'generic' skill development. Journal of Learning Design, 1(2), 21-34.

Shea, R. (2014, May ). A national call to action: Do we need a new discourse on learning? Keynote presentation at Exploring Partnerships in Teaching and Learning. Integrated and Engaged Learning Conference, Sir Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON.

Presenters
JT

Jill Tomasson Goodwin

Associate Professor, University of Waterloo
Jill Tomasson Goodwin is an Associate Professor in the Digital Arts Communication program at the University of Waterloo. Her research interests include experiential education, ePortfolios, and skills-based learning and assessment.
KL

Katherine Lithgow

Katherine Lithgow- is a Senior Instructional Developer, Integrative Learning with the Centre of Teaching Excellence at the University of Waterloo. Katherine facilitates eportfolio and integrative learning initiatives, supporting instructors across campus with the design and implementation of activities that help students integrate learning in academic, workplace, community and social environments.

Additional Authors
JG

Joslin Goh

Joslin Goh is the Associate Director of the Statistical Consulting and Collaborative Research Unit in the Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science at the University of Waterloo. Her research revolves around the development of new theoretical and algorithmic methodology for applied problems, with focus on applications involving randomization restriction and large data structures.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 146

11:15

CON01.13a - Engagement and Belongingness: Yorke’s Model in a Canadian University
How can we foster student engagement, belongingness, and self-confidence? What impact does each have on student learning outcomes – both student perceptions and measured grades?

This project uses Yorke’s (2014) instrument, which was developed for the UK “What Works” initiative (Thomas, 2012). We are motivated by changes to our student mix: more diversity, more students struggling to get established.

For our study, we work with high impact teaching practices (Kuh, 2008). We examine the experiences of new university students, and their perspectives on outcomes – using start and end of term surveys along with quantitative data from the student database. We examine:
  • Student characteristics (age, nationality, gender, language skills)
  • Academic preparedness (high school average, autonomous learning and writing skills)
  • Engagement, belongingness and self confidence – the Yorke scale
  • Learniing outcomes: Student perceptions and measured grades.
We used means comparison, regression and anovas to analyze the data. As expected, the most important determinants of engagement and belongingness are instructor and student efforts, and both are strong predictors of student perceived learning outcomes. Academic preparedness and student characteristics are not a factor in determining engagement or belongingness.

The surprise is that we did not find a strong relationship between engagement & belongingness and grades. Social inclusion, instructor and student effort were relatively weak predictors. Academic preparedness and student characteristics are the only strong predictors of grades.

What Factors Best Predict Grades?  We took a look - the data comparison is attached in a presentation file.



The data raises a big question, which we will examine next round of our study: If the Yorke scale variables (engagement and belongingness) don’t predict grades, are we measuring and focusing on the right things? Should we shift away from engagement and belongingness and back to performance basics?

So what should we be doing in our classrooms? Join us – let’s take a look at the research – and let’s discuss what it means.

References:

Kuh, G. (2008). High-Impact Educational Practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington.

Thomas, L. (2012). Building student engagement and belonging in Higher Education at a time of change: final report from the What Works? Student Retention & Success programme.

Yorke, M. (2014). Student ‘belongingness’, engagement and self-confidence in UK higher education. Proceedings from EAIR 36th Annual Forum, Essen, Germany, 29 August 2014.

Presenters
avatar for Wallace Lockhart

Wallace Lockhart

University of Regina
Wallace Lockhart is an associate professor with the Paul J. Hill School of Business at the University of Regina. He became a SOTL scholar out of necessity – growing student diversity and the challenges it presents mean we all have to better understand our students and our roles as educators.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 315 (Council Chambers)

11:15

CON01.16c - Why cut a program that works? Undergraduate Teaching Assistants, Large Lecture Retention, Institutional Policy & Culture
This case study analyzes quantitative and qualitative data from the Large Lecture Retention Enhancement Initiative at Northern Michigan University which integrated paid and trained undergraduate teaching assistants (TAs) into large enrollment courses with traditionally high failure rates for a three year pilot study from 2012-2015. The goal of the program was to increase the overall university retention rate by promoting student academic success via incorporating 12-18 TAs per semester to assist faculty in implementing active learning strategies to and assist students with course specific content and study skills outside of class. Measures used to gauge the success of the three year pilot program include 4,000+ participating student grades, third semester retention rates of the participating courses, third semester retention rates of the overall university, teaching assistant documentation of meetings with students outside of class, and nearly 2,000 anonymous student surveys measuring student perceptions of the teaching assistants in their large lecture courses. Additionally, costs to administer the program also factor into this analysis. The findings indicate that according to most measures the program increased both student academic success and third semester retention. The program probably paid for itself based on the retained students who paid tuition for another semester. The students valued the program and the teaching assistants obtained valuable professional development experiences. Even so, due to institutional policies and a culture that does not value retention in the face of rapidly declining enrollment, the program was eliminated. The findings in this study may serve as a model for analysis of other institutions’ TA programs as well as provide examples of best practices that could be easily replicated. This author will also present concluding arguments about how policy and culture shape retention programs so others may identify potential strengths and/or weaknesses within their own institutions if attempting a similar program.

Presenters
KJ

Kathryn Johnson

Kathryn Johnson teaches History at Northern Michigan University and Ashford University Online. She is also pursuing a doctorate in educational leadership with focusing on higher education retention and adult online learning.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
Weldon Library 121 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

11:15

TAGSA Special Interest Group - Building TAGSA: Looking Back, Moving Forward
Presenters: TAGSA Executive Committee.

Are you interested in graduate student professional development and teaching assistant support? Whether you are an instructor, a graduate student, or work in educational development, please join this special session facilitated by the executive committee of the Teaching Assistant and Graduate Student Advancement (TAGSA) Special Interest Group (SIG) of STLHE. Join a strong network of like-minded people, who will work in this session to build on the ideas established in the past seven years (since the SIG’s inception) to discuss “where does TAGSA go from here?” The session will begin with a brief history of the SIG and what has been accomplished before moving onto lively discussion in facilitated groups to talk about the needs and wishes of graduate students and the people who work in this area.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 11:15 - 12:15
UCC 67

12:00

12:15

Lunch (Sponsored by Magna Publications)
Take advantage of informal Lunch & Learn opportunities with our sponsors. SPonsors will have reserved tables in Mustang Lounge - bring your lunch and join them for a discussion.

Wednesday June 22, 2016 12:15 - 13:30
Community Room and The Wave (UCC) Western University

12:15

13:30

CON02.03 - Truth and Reconciliation: Post-secondary Educators and the Calls to Action
In 2015, the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada was published and released, summarizing the national tragedy and the continuing legacy of Canada’s residential school system on our country’s Indigenous peoples. The report specifically calls upon provincial governments to, “Provide the necessary funding to post-secondary institutions to educate teachers on how to integrate Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods into classrooms” (Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, 2015, p.7). This is no small task as post-secondary institutions have long been considered bastions of Eurocentric knowledge, denying or limiting Indigenous knowledges’ entrance into academia’s curricula and research (Smith, 1999) In addition, various reports outline obstacles to post-secondary success by Indigenous students, contributing to lower post-secondary attainment by this specific demographic (Malatest, 2010). Previous studies of K-12 educators have related their concerns when asked to engage in the inclusion of Indigenous perspectives and knowledge into their teaching and classrooms (Kanu, 2011), however, the understandings of post-secondary educators in implementing Indigenous knowledge has not been fully explored.


As educators in academia, we endeavour to understand our society and recount this knowledge for our students to learn, analyze and internalize. If post-secondary institutions are to address the Calls to Action as outlined by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, then post-secondary educators will need to become familiar and comfortable with introducing and including Indigenous perspectives in their curriculum.


This presentation will provide post-secondary educators the opportunity to explore the Calls to Action, reflecting on current and future practice in relation to Indigenous cultural inclusion. This presentation will create a safe environment for participants to share their questions, stories, and inquiries into the processes and avenues of Indigenous cultural curricular inclusion. Participants will be introduced to different processes and approaches for future exploration and engagement.

Presenters
CH

Chris Hachkowski

Asst. Professor, Nipissing University
Chris Hachkowski is an Assistant Professor and Principal, Aboriginal Programs with the Schulich School of Education at Nipissing University and doctoral candidate at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. He works with First Nation schools in Ontario, delivering Aboriginal teacher- and Aboriginal educational assistant-training programs.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 54B

13:30

CON02.12 - Motivating Learning in an Introductory Women's Studies Course: Flexibility, Reflection, Experience
Introductory Women’s Studies (WS 101) at a mid-sized, STEM-oriented, comprehensive university can be a challenge. Potential resistance to new information and ideas can be compounded in a large class, of which a significant number of learners are not there by choice (WS 101 is required for some). Although several come in having already been introduced to social justice principles, many of the 150 learners are uncertain about feminism’s relevance. Resistance, however, is both necessary and welcome in the formation of critical thinking (Lather, P. 1991. Getting Smart). Our workshop puts participants in direct contact with course processes that motivated learners to go beyond their own expectations and succeed in experiential learning, flexible authentic assessment, and critical reflection.


Redesigning the course in 2015 to involve experiential opportunities, the Instructor and a Librarian brought students into our Special Collections & Archives to transcribe and digitize century-old notes by a suffragist. Students also visited community organizations, critically reflecting through Intellectual Response Papers. Take-home examination questions brought weekly mini-journals back into view for students to reflect post-course on their learning through evolving theoretical lenses (Schön, D.A., 1983. The Reflective Practitioner).

Learners initially expressed uncertainty about their ability to accomplish tasks such as transcribing cursive script, or applying concepts to local sexual health organizations possibly unaligned with their own moral stances. By the end of the course, they had taken up alternate format assignments based on local field experiences of direct personal relevance (Svinicki, M. 2004. Learning and Motivation in the Postsecondary Classroom; Kuh, G. 2008. High Impact Educational Practices).

By the end of the session, participants will have attempted their own transcription, responded to at least one journal prompt, and engaged with students and the course team, in order to consider how similar techniques might transfer to their own contexts.

Presenters
BB

Brianna Bennett

Brianna Bennett is a student at the University of Waterloo.
JB

Jessica Blackwell

Jessica Blackwell is Special Collections and Archives Librarian at the University of Waterloo.
TB

Tatianna Brierley

Tatianna Brierley is a student at the University of Waterloo.
avatar for Trevor Holmes

Trevor Holmes

Senior Instructional Developer, University of Waterloo
Trevor Holmes is an educational developer with a background in cultural studies and English literature. He teaches in the Women's Studies program at the University of Waterloo where he is also a Senior Instructional Developer at the Centre for Teaching Excellence.
EL

Emily Lorentz

Emily Lorentz is a student at the University of Waterloo.
MV

Meghan Voll

Meghan Voll is a student at the University of Waterloo.

Additional Authors
KA

Katrina Ackerman

Katrina Ackerman recently defended her Doctoral dissertation at Waterloo and has taken up a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Regina.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 146

13:30

CON02.18 - Building Student-Faculty Partnerships in Curriculum Development and Community Engagement
NOTE: this session has moved locations to Weldon Library 121.

Student engagement is vital in creating a highly enriched academic experience. Activities that engage students can be transformative, extending beyond participation within the traditional classroom setting, and include valuable experiential learning strategies1. These can be created through faculty-student partnerships that fall within an engagement framework that includes five major elements – personal, academic, intellectual, social and professional engagement – and promote a deeper understanding and application of course content2,3. The objective of this proposed workshop is to introduce the conference participants (i.e., faculty, staff and students) to various models of student engagement and how to implement them in their own research. A team of faculty and students will co-present three models of student engagement that are centred on student leadership. These student-led activities include
1) creating interactive hands-on undergraduate, teaching laboratory exercises,
 2) incorporating interactive online applications within the classroom for formative assessment, and
3) engaging in the development of public education tools through community programs.

Our demonstrations will engage the audience using hands-on activities that have been designed by students, use of online applications for assessment and scenarios that showcase the significance of student engagement. Using these models, we will focus on how to build student-faculty partnerships that place value on the student experience, creativity and motivation. Participants will also have the opportunity to reflect on their own practices involving student engagement, and through open discussions, share their experiences on student-faculty partnerships. Finally, through student testimonials we will highlight how making students partners in their academic experience creates an open learning environment, fosters a sense of pride among students and develops meaningful professional relationships for students and faculty.

1. Slavich, G. M., & Zimbardo, P. G. (2012). Transformational teaching: Theoretical underpinnings, basic principles, and core methods. Educational Psychology Review, 24(4), 569-608.

2. Pittaway, S. M. (2012). Student and staff engagement: Developing an engagement framework in a faculty of education. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 37(4), 3.

3. Barkley, E. F. (2009). Student engagement techniques: A handbook for college faculty. John Wiley & Sons.

Presenters
DC

Dora Cavallo-Medved

Dora Cavallo-Medved, PhD, is faculty member in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Windsor. She teaches Introductory Biology for Science majors and engages undergraduate science students in curriculum development and public education. She is also a recipient of the Faculty of Science’s Roger Thibert Teaching Excellence Award. |
ME

Mitchell Elliott

Mitchell Elliott is a graduate from the University of Windsor and currently a medical student at the University of Toronto. Mitchell has developed online assessment tools for first year biology students and public education materials for the Faculty of Science and the Windsor Cancer Research Group.
MG

Melanie Grondin

Melanie Grondin is a third year undergraduate biology student at the University of Windsor. Melanie has developed online assessment tools for first year biology students and public education materials for the Faculty of Science and the Windsor Cancer Research Group.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
Weldon Library 121 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

13:30

CON02.01 - Balancing Resources across Strategies, Projects and Programs in Educational Development
A typical mix of activities within educational development includes ongoing base programs common across institutions (e.g., for new teachers), limited-term projects on current academic priorities and longer-term strategic initiatives for distinctive institutional excellence. We all need to balance the assignment of our limited resources across this range of activities.

In this session we will learn from each other about dealing with these challenges, identify further issues of interest and explore ways to foster collaboration on finding the right mix in our local contexts. To kick off discussion, leaders from three Canadian institutions will share insights from their experiences and identify one issue or challenge where they are seeking collective wisdom.

Participants will also suggest additional issues or challenges of importance, followed by small group discussion to share ideas, insights and experiences on specific common interests. The session concludes with exploration of follow-up activities to continue our collective learning.

Presenters
avatar for Tom Carey

Tom Carey

Thomas Carey is Executive-in-Residence for Teaching & Learning Innovation at the B.C. Association of Institutes and Universities (Victoria B.C.) and the Office of Research & Innovation at George Brown College (Toronto), a Research Professor at San Diego State University, Visiting Scholar in the Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation at the University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia) and a former Associate Vice-President for Learning... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Penny Light

Tracy Penny Light

Executive Director, Centre for Student Engagement and Learning Innovation, Thompson Rivers Universtity
Tracy Penny Light is Executive Director of the Centre for Student Engagement and Learning Innovation at Thompson Rivers University, and former Director of the Women's Studies program at the University of Waterloo.
JM

Joy Mighty

Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning), Carleton University
Joy Mighty is Associate Vice-President (Teaching and Learning) at Carleton University and previously directed centres for teaching and learning at Queen's University and the University of New Brunswick.
PW

Peter Wolf

Peter Wolf has worked in educational development, continuing education, and distance education for over 20 years, in the college and university systems, and is currently at Queen’s University as the Associate Vice-Provost (Teaching & Learning). Peter is an advocate for enhanced access to and development of quality higher education learning.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 37

13:30

CON02.06 - Educational Developers Leading and Empowering the SoTL
Educational Developers (EDs) act as leaders to support faculty and staff in promoting, supporting, and providing leadership for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). At the same time, promotion and tenure, funding issues, and research/ teaching tensions may impede SoTL growth. To explore the context for SoTL, we surveyed educational developers, faculty members, and administrators about SoTL supports and obstacles.

We explore ways EDs construe their SoTL leadership role and how they facilitate connections to create critical social networks for SoTL (Martensson, Roxa, & Olsson, 2012; Williams et al., 2013).

We will discuss participants’ perceptions about supporting SoTL in four areas: Engagement (SoTL involvement), Connections (networking), Collaborations (building on connections), and Advocacy (SoTL promotion). We consider how we build capacity in different “trading zones” (Galison, 1997): Micro, Meso, Macro, and Mega (Poole & Simmons, 2013).

We will
  1. Discuss similarities and differences among ED, faculty, and administrator perspectives on supporting the SoTL;
  2. Consider roles regarding formal and informal SoTL support;
  3. Create action plans for supporting the SoTL at your own institution.

Galison, P. (1997). Image & logic: A material culture of microphysics. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.

Poole, G., & Simmons, N. (2013). The contributions of the scholarship of teaching and learning to quality enhancement in Canada. In G. Gordon, & R. Land (Eds.), Quality enhancement in higher education: International perspectives (pp. 118-128). London: Routledge.

Martensson, K., Roxa, T., & Olsson, T. (2012). Developing a quality culture through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Higher Education Research & Development, 30(1), 51-62.

Williams, A., Verwood, R., Beery, T. A., Dalton, H., McKinnon, J., Strickland, K., Pace, J., & Poole, G. (2013). The power of social networks: A model for weaving the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning into institutional culture. Teaching and Learning Inquiry, 1(2), 49-62.

Presenters
NS

Nicola Simmons

Nicola Simmons is in Graduate and Undergraduate Education, Brock. Past roles include Founding Chair of SoTL Canada; Vice-President, Canada of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; Vice-President, SoTL, for Canada’s Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE); and Chair of Canada’s Educational Developers Caucus. |

Additional Authors
LT

Lynn Taylor

Lynn Taylor is the Vice-Provost (Teaching and Learning) at the University of Calgary, continuing her career focus on building teaching and learning capacity at the postsecondary level. Her practice and scholarship interests include teaching and learning in higher education, educational development, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and academic leadership.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 59

13:30

CON02.08 - Developing a Leadership in Teaching & Learning Fellowship Program at an Ontario University
The aim of this interactive workshop is to describe and discuss a Leadership in Teaching & Learning Fellowship program recently implemented at an Ontario University. With this program, we aim to build leadership capacity in teaching, extend the conversations about teaching and learning by fostering the growth of networks, disseminate project outcomes both within and beyond departmental boundaries and implement a mentorship element to better enable faculty to lead their departments through a process of continuous development. We will describe the program, which is comprised of two complementary streams: 1) Evaluating Course Impact, and 2) Implementing Program Change. The Evaluating Course Impact stream focuses on generating evidence of high impact innovations within courses and the Implementing Program Change focuses on implementing a change initiative to enhance academic programs. Preliminary results from the inaugural cohort of program participants will be presented to highlight their experiences and perspectives of the Fellowship program.

Presenters
NF

Nancy Fenton

McMaster University
Nancy Fenton, PhD; Educational Consultant; McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL); McMaster University
LG

Lori Goff

McMaster University
Lori Goff is the Manager of Program Enhancement at McMaster University. Her research interests in peer mentoring and quality enhancement are fundamentally focused on enhancing students’ learning experiences within the university context


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 61

13:30

CON02.02 - "What if we could attract and retain more students? How supporting UDL using modern text-to-speech technology empowers learners and educators" (Sponsored by Readspeaker)
Many factors affect students’ intentions to graduate, yet recent work shows that prominent among the factors modifiable by the school, the student or the community is “strong course self-efficacy”. Research also shows that significant numbers of post-secondary students do not read very well.  One major step to improved self-efficacy:  speech-enable your Learning Management System!   We’ll provide an overview of how this is done nearly automatically using ReadSpeaker technologies, who’s already doing it, and why it’s so cost-effective.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Hughes

Michael Hughes

Business Director, Canada, ReadSpeaker LLC
Let's talk about how Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and User Experience (UX) connect, and how you and your colleagues can deliver both to better support your teachers and learners! I'm the Canadian lead for ReadSpeaker, the world-leader in speech-enabling Learning Management Systems, including Brightspace by D2L, Blackboard, Moodle, Canvas, and more! When you provide a Listen or Ecoutez button to press, it means your students and... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 54A

13:30

CON02.05 - Praktik: Empowering Students Through the Development of Innovative Software for Digital Simulation
This presentation will focus on the collaborative model between Interactive Media and Nursing/Health Science programs in place at a college in Southern Ontario. This collaboration, branded as Praktik, has been established as an interdisciplinary partnership that allows Interactive Media students to design and develop educational modules for use by Nursing and Health Science students within their curricula; the initial modules to be developed were selected to offer students ‘free’ access to digital simulation and learning experiences that will allow them to better prepare for time in dedicated simulation labs and for other classroom work. The first Praktik module, focusing on blood pressure measurement, features 2D and 3D graphics, 2D/3D animations, audio, video, as well as fully interactive anatomical models and instrument simulations. This will allow for integrated media activities where visuals, audio and interaction combine to best deliver the key content. Beyond what is possible with print, Web or video content, the modules are designed with non-linear user interactivity in mind, allowing students to access and repeat content at their own pace. The presentation will focus on the design and development process for the overall Praktik ‘brand’ to identify all future health education module development; the specific team-based development process for the initial module. Presenters will also discuss the role of students in all phases of this collaborative project, and the plan for quantitative efficacy research to be conducted to determine the utility of digital simulation software in educational settings. A prototype of the initial module in development will be available for hands-on demonstration and use by attendees.

Presenters
NA

Natalia Aguillon

Natalia Aguillon is the Media and Applied Research Technologist for the Interactive Media program cluster at Fanshawe College. She has a background in Industrial Design and Web Design, and has several years of experience in project and production management for technology-based projects, Graphic Design and Web technologies.
RH

Robert Haaf

Robert Haaf is Professor and Coordinator in the Interactive Media Design and Interactive Media Specialist programs at Fanshawe. He has over 20 years of experience in applied research, assistive and educational technology, and Web development technologies. He also has over 10 years of experience in rehabilitation for communication disorders. |
HH

Helen Harrison

Helen Harrison, MScN, is a Registered Nurse with a clinical background in medical-surgical nursing and twelve years’ experience in adult and nursing education. She is a professor and year one coordinator in the School of Nursing at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario and her research interests include facilitating experiential learning.
MA

Mary Anne Krahn

Mary Anne Krahn is a Registered Nurse with a clinical background in paediatric nursing and broad range of experience in nursing education. She is the Program Chair in the School of Nursing at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario and a doctoral student in the Faculty of Education at Western University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 58

13:30

CON02.15 - Supporting eLearning on campus: Drawing inspiration from the continuous improvement of an eLearning toolkit
In this workshop, Western's eLearning Toolkit serves as a starting point for discussing institutional supports for eLearning technologies. Presenters will highlight the developmental milestones of an eLearning Toolkit redesign process, exploring design choices in context of literature-based recommendations. Specifically, those that call for improvements to instructors' points of entry, assisting instructors with evaluating the efficacy of various technologies, and focusing on questions of alignment and resonance with pedagogical intentions. Interactive elements of the Toolkit will be demonstrated with the opportunity for hands-on engagement. More importantly, however, the Toolkit demonstration will serve as a starting point for facilitating conversation between participants to address an overall question of how instructors are best supported in discovering and utilizing technologies in their teaching. Participants of this session will be challenged to reflect upon the eLearning supports available at their own institutions in order to identify various strengths, challenges, and needed improvements.

Presenters
LA

Lauren Anstey

eLearning & Curriculum Specialist, Western University
Lauren Anstey is an eLearning and Curriculum Specialist in the Teaching Support Centre at Western University. Her doctoral research (Queen's University, 2016) focused on Authentic Inquiry Learning. She is particularly passionate about alignment in curricular design and the meaningful integration of technologies for student-centred learning.
SH

Stephanie Horsley

Assistant Professor, Music Education/eLearning and Curriculum Associate, Western University
Stephanie Horsley is an eLearning and Curriculum Specialist in the Teaching Support Centre and also develops and teaches online music education courses at Western University. Current research interests include student engagement in the online environment, design support for online instructors, and the impact of social media on various music learning contexts.
JS

Jennifer Sadler

Jennifer Sadler is an eLearning Technology Specialist in the Instructional Technology Resource Centre at Western University. She helps implement educational technologies on campus and supports instructors with the use of eLearning tools.
avatar for Gavan Watson

Gavan Watson

Associate Director, eLearning, Western University
Gavan P.L. Watson is the Associate Director, eLearning at Western University’s Teaching Support Centre and is the past chair of the Council of Ontario Educational Developers. With a PhD in environmental education, Gavan has a professional background in educational development and has published widely on topics such as: the role of technology in non-formal environmental learning; teaching critical reflection to graduate students; and using... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 66 (WALS, Sponsored by Nelson)

13:30

CON02.09 - Learning to ‘fail’ for success: developing student Mindsets to promote resilience, tenacity and effective learning.

Thomas Edison famously failed to make a lightbulb 1000 times before he was successful. James Dyson made 5,126 prototypes of his bagless vacuum cleaner before the one that worked. Harry Potter author Joanne Rowling was rejected by twelve publishers before her manuscript was accepted. The lessons from this for students in higher education are clear; to engage effectively with the learning processes in higher education, take responsibility for their academic attainment, and become the innovators of the future, students need the underpinning ‘grit’ and resilience to actively engage with the ‘failures’ they will inevitably experience during their studies.


This workshop provides a theoretical framework (Carol Dweck’s Mindset theory [Dweck, 2006]) and practical activities to enable you to encourage and develop your students’ effort, tenacity, and ‘confidence in failure’; and to develop a culture of learning resilience in an environment where the stakes are high and costly, and the student goal is the academic outcome, not the learning process itself.


In this workshop you will explore ways to support your students to develop more 'Growth-Mindset' approaches such as determination and robustness, through the use of 'planned points of failure' which are supported by the use of formative assessment and effective feedback practices.

Please bring with you, or be able to access, assessment materials for ONE module or course you teach on, as you will be working with these in the session (e.g. learning outcomes, summative tasks, grading matrices or criteria, formative assessment opportunities).

 
By the end of this workshop you should be able to:

  • Examine the principles of Dweck’s Mindset theory

  • Explore some of your students’ Mindsets within your discipline

  • Identify uses of formative assessment and tutor support to actively encourage your learners to develop more of a Growth Mindset

References


Dweck, C. (2006). Mindset: The new psychology of success. How we can learn to fulfil our potential. New York: Ballantine Books.


Boud, D. & Molloy, E. (2013). Rethinking models of feedback for learning: the challenge of design. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 38 (6), 698-712.


James Dyson interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5eIyRVpwmc







Presenters
avatar for Lindsay Davies

Lindsay Davies

Academic Practice Consultant, Nottingham Trent University (NTU)
Dr Lindsay Davies is a Fellow of the HEA with over 20 years’ experience of working in higher education, and leads on key professional development activities for enhancing the capabilities of research-active staff and doctoral students. Her own practice centres on pedagogic theory and philosophy in higher education.
avatar for Udaramati Melanie Pope

Udaramati Melanie Pope

Academic Practice Consultant, Nottingham Trent University
Dr Udaramati Melanie Pope’s career spans twenty years in education, from secondary school English teaching to PhD supervision. She has led UK teacher education courses and is an Academic Practice Consultant at Nottingham Trent University, where she is currently course leader for the Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice. Udaramati is also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. | She is also an ordained Buddhist with the Triratna... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 63

13:30

CON02.10 - Learning to Bounce: Using 'Wise Interventions' in the Classroom to Teach Resilience
Among parents, teachers, and university administrators, there is a growing concern that today's undergraduates are lacking resilience--an essential skill that allows students to become fully empowered learners. Current research explores how resilient behaviours might be learned in the university classroom and how activities aimed at developing student resilience could form a part of any course's curriculum. This workshop will explore how instructors can help their students to become more resilient learners through the use of what Gregory Walton (2014) terms “wise interventions”—stealthy and focused interventions in the classroom whose aim is to change specific psychological processes that inhibit students from thriving.


This workshop will begin by introducing Stanford University's “Resilience Project” and the Resilience Research Consortium to which Stanford and other universities across North America belong. These schools believe that resilience is skill that can be taught and have undertaken the important work of finding ways of teaching resilience to undergraduates. Next, I will briefly discuss my own “Bounce Project” and my SOTL research (funded by my university’s Learning and Teaching Centre) that uses Walton’s study of “wise interventions” to increase resilience in undergraduates. I will then ask small groups of participants to work together to share their understandings of what it means to be resilient and to behave resiliently. We will then come back together to share our ideas and to better understand what we mean when we discuss resilience in the context of an academic environment. What kinds of resilient behaviours do they as teachers model in the classroom? What kinds of “wise interventions” could they include in their own curriculum? What kinds of “wise interventions” have they tried? We will then once again engage in a group discussion and share our findings with each other in an effort to find ways to teach resilience to our students. By helping our students to become more resilient, to help them see resilience as a skill that can be learned, we are not only empowering our students for the duration of their academic careers, but we are also effecting lasting and life-long change.

Presenters
RG

Rebecca Gagan

Rebecca Gagan is an Assistant Teaching Professor in the Department of English at The University of Victoria.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 65

13:30

CON02.14 - At the Intersection of Cognitive Science and Education: Gamifying 2nd Year Neuroscience Course to Encourage Retrieval-Based Learning
Latest research suggests that what we traditionally consider as “learning” - the “encoding or acquisition of new information” (Karpicke & Nunes, 2015), is only one half of the equation. The other, arguably more important half, consists of retrieval processes, those “involved in using available cues to actively reconstruct knowledge” (Karpicke, 2012). Recent findings in cognitive psychology tell us that practicing active retrieval enhances long-term, meaningful learning in significant ways, and that it could be a more active and effective learning strategy than many currently popular “active learning” strategies (Blunt & Karpicke, 2011).

As instructors and instructional designers we are faced with three big challenges: 1) How to design retrieval-based activities; 2) How to raise awareness about the importance and effects of this learning strategy that “too many students lack metacognitive awareness of” (Karpicke, 2012); and 3) How to promote and encourage students to engage in learning activities that require significant effort but produce longer-lasting results.

To tackle these challenges posed by leading researchers in the field, we have incorporated online activities that balance retrieval difficulty and retrieval success, in a traditionally challenging second year, high-enrollment, core Neuroscience course (“Biological Foundations of Behaviour”), designed in a blended format. To motivate students to engage with the activities, some gamification principles were utilized. Apart from formative and summative assessment spread throughout the course, students are also required to take a final, live, cumulative exam. In this presentation we will discuss the potential relationship between student success and some engagement patterns with online retrieval-based activities, and their success in a final exam.

The main audience for this presentation is instructors and instructional designers. The participants will leave the session with the awareness of the latest research in the field, and with possible strategies for designing activities which promote and encourage retrieval-based learning.

References

Blunt, J.R., & Karpicke, J. D. (2011). Retrieval Practice Produces More Learning than Elaborative Studying with Concept Mapping. Science 331, 772 (2011); DOI: 10.1126/science.1199327

Karpicke, J. D. (2012). Retrieval-based learning: Active retrieval promotes meaningful learning. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21, 157-163.

Karpicke, J. D., & Nunes, L.D. (2015). Retrieval-based learning: Research at the interface between cognitive science and education. In R. A. Scott & S. M. Kosslyn (Eds.), Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (pp. 1-16). John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Presenters
avatar for Kim Hellemans

Kim Hellemans

Instructor, Carleton University
Kim Hellemans, PhD is the Undergraduate Chair at the Department of Neuroscience at Carleton University, Ottawa. Dr. Hellemans has an extensive experience teaching courses in face-to-face, blended and distance format, for which she has received several prestigious teaching awards including Provost’s Fellowship in Teaching Award and the Capital Educators Award.
avatar for Maristela Petrovic-Dzerdz

Maristela Petrovic-Dzerdz

Instructional Design Coordinator, Carleton University
Maristela Petrovic-Dzerdz, MEng, BEd, PBDID designs online and blended courses and advises faculty on best teaching and learning practices grounded in theory and research. Passionate about education, Maristela is also a graduate student of Distance Education at Athabasca University, member of Ontario College of Teachers and a Registered Yoga Teacher. She regularly presents at educational conferences such as STLHE, CNIE and ETUG.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
Weldon Library 258

13:30

CON02.07 - Pedagogical Training and the Future of the PhD Program
Doctoral programs have come under intense scrutiny in recent years. Among their critics are significant stakeholders, including the American Historical Association, which recently invested $1.6 million to reform four flagship programs (Grafton & Grossman, 2011; Jaschik, 2014); the Modern Language Association, whose report on “Doctoral Study in Modern Language and Literature” stresses “the urgent need for change” (Alonso et al., 2014); SSHRC Canada’s “White Paper on the Future of the PhD in the Humanities” (2013), which has spawned national conferences at McGill (2015) and Carleton (2016); and a former president of Harvard, Derek Bok, whose article, “We Must Prepare Ph.D. Students for the Complicated Art of Teaching” (2013), speaks directly to one of the core concerns of these critics—that is, as the MLA report puts it, the need to “strengthen teaching preparation” (2014) for doctoral candidates.


This session will feature a short research paper that surveys the landscape of doctoral reform, focusing on the experience of English departments. Examining departmentally- and institutionally-led initiatives, the paper will argue for the need to re-imagine the place of teaching and teacher training in the doctoral experience. Two current doctoral students will then provide short, reflective responses in which they will situate their own experiences in relation to the wider trends identified in the paper. These responses will then be followed by an audience-driven discussion in which members will be invited to consider what roles we, as educational developers and/or instructors, might play in meeting these calls for change.


At the end of the session, participants will be able to:




  • Summarize the discourse surrounding doctoral reform, especially as concerns pedagogical instruction


  • Formulate hypotheses as to the roles that we, as educational developers and/or instructors, might or would like to play in the reformed doctoral experience that is on the immediate horizon



Presenters
BB

Bridgette Brown

Bridgette Brown is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English at Carleton University and a graduate of the EDC's "Certificate in TA Skills" program. Her research focuses on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Canadian literature.
AP

Ajay Parasram

Ajay Parasram is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Political Economy at Carleton University and a graduate of the EDC's "Preparing to Teach" certificate program. His research focuses on the colonial constitution of modern nation-states.
avatar for Morgan Rooney

Morgan Rooney

Educational Development Facilitator, Carleton University
Dr. Morgan Rooney is an Educational Developer (Educational Development Centre [EDC]) and Adjunct Research Professor (Department of English) at Carleton University. As an Educational Developer, his main responsibility is the pedagogical development of graduate students. As a researcher, his area of study is British literature of the "long" eighteenth century.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 60

13:30

CON02.04 - Welcome to My Classroom: Establishing Relevance via Embodied Engagement
Semiotic choreology is an approach I developed for exploration and analysis of cultural phenomena through the expressive body. Using Laban’s movement existentials of body, space, quality and relation, in combination with a phenomenological analysis, I and my students can describe and (sometimes) physically enact thematized and spontaneous movement sequences. I invite participants to engage with questions I pose by doing a simple movement experience that involves typical everyday body movement, and connecting the movement experience with the questions and with the overarching subject matter context that launched the questions. There is a balance of small group, large group and individual reflective experiences. What semiotic choreology makes possible, depending on how I am able to involve learners and other participants, is the implication of the body of the person attempting to formulate meaning, and the tethering of that meaning making to the body’s expressive and reflexive potentialities. The body remembers.


Dissonance plays a primary role in my teaching and learning. The sooner I can move learners to dissonance, the sooner they can engage with unfamiliar, unsettling ideas and propositions. Thus unhinged from their habitual ways of thinking and knowing, they can consider approaches that they previously would resist or avoid. Yet, dissonance used like a bludgeon loses its effectiveness, hence, I must choreograph a more nuanced, progressive unfolding. I use strategically constructed questions which appear innocent and accompany these with movement engagement that allows the participants to unhinge from their habitual forms of engaging learning ‘from the neck up’. Using three progressive questions and simple movement activities within a small group format, I will provide several embedded layers that we can then unpack as a group in a larger facilitated discussion. Together we can explore how embodied engagement might allow students to connect with any subject matter in meaningful ways.

Presenters
MC

Maureen Connolly

Dr. Maureen Connolly is a Professor of Physical Education and Kinesiology in the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University. Maureen’s teaching and research interests include curriculum, stressed embodiment, dance & movement education, and Freirian approaches to teaching and learning. Her theoretical dispositions are semiotic, phenomenological, post/anti-colonial, irreverent and quixotic.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 13:30 - 14:20
UCC 56

14:20

14:45

CON03.03 - Can’t see the forest for the trees? or is it: Can’t see the roots for the leaves?
The co-creators of this fifty minute workshop teach a course within a professional social work program called Advancing Social Justice. The course is grounded in a hybrid learning theory labeled “transformative experiential pedagogy” (Campbell and Baikie, 2013, p. 454) and relies on a teaching methodology called critically reflective analysis. As an adaptation of the Fook/Gardner model of critical reflection (Baikie, Campbell, Thornhill, & Butler, 2012; Fook & Gardner, 2007) this methodology emphasizes the need to “explicitly surface the fundamental values, assumptions and beliefs that inform personal and/or professional perspectives and behaviours” (Campbell and Baikie, 2013, p. 453). The instructors have developed a myriad of metaphors, exercise, and resources to enrich the teaching and learning process in the context of both face to face and on line instruction.

As this is an interactive workshop the presenters will assume that most participants are familiar with the theoretical foundations of transformative education and will only briefly theoretically situate their work. After presenting the ‘The Tree Metaphor’, a reoccurring metaphor used throughout the course (hence the workshop title), they will lead participants though three experiential exercises: ‘Should I sleep with my boyfriend?’, ‘Why are we changing maps?’, and ‘Creation stories’. Although time constraints mean that each exercise will be explored in an abbreviated form session participants will engage in small and large group discussions, role plays, and watch a short video.

Through participating in this workshop participants will
  • Be able to theoretically situate the metaphors, exercises, and resources shared during the session
  • Experience, in an abbreviated fashion, some of the experiential classroom exercises designed to aid students in surfacing, identifying, and potentially changing assumptions
  • Learn how these experiential exercises are utilized within face to face and on line instruction

Baikie, G., Campbell, C., Thornhill, J., & Butler, J. (2012). An on line critical reflection dialogue group. In J. Fook & F. Gardner (Eds.), Critical reflection in context: Specific applications in health and social care. Oxford: Routledge.

Campbell, C. & Baikie, G. (2013) Teaching critical reflection in the context of a social justice course. Reflective Practice, 14 (4). Available from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14623943.2013.806299#.UcMYgkrTC2U

Fook, J., & Gardner, F. (2007). Practising critical reflection: A resource handbook. Berkshire: Open University Press.

Presenters
CC

Carolyn Campbell

Carolyn Campbell is an Associate Professor at the School of Social Work, Dalhousie University. As an educator and social worker she has focused on congruence between the content and processes of education for critical practice. She is Past President of the Canadian Association for Social Work Education and recipient of the 2015 Dalhousie University Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Additional Authors
GB

Gail Baikie

Gail Baikie is an Assistant Professor at the School of Social Work, Dalhousie University. She has had a lengthy professional career primarily related to the social development of Indigenous peoples. The identification and development of decolonizing and indigenous methods for research, professional development and social work practice guides her scholarly work. Professor Baikie will not be attending as a presenter.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 54B

14:45

CON03.07 - Transitioning to Blended Teaching: The Successes and Challenges of an Institutional Initiative
Transforming how we are teaching, especially when transitioning from a lecture based format to a more blended one using various forms of instructional technology is a challenging endeavour. To support professors in the way courses are designed and taught, the Teaching and Learning Support Service at the University of Ottawa has been responsible for putting together a professional development program aimed at designing effective blended courses. Based on the works of Fink & Knight Fink (2009), Garrison & Vaughan (2011), and Wiggins & McTighe (2005), we have designed a program to meet the needs of professors interested in transforming their teaching by including enhanced use of technologies available for learning at the university level. The goal of this interactive workshop is to share the model we have implemented, discuss the successes and the challenges we have faced, and gather suggestions for improvement based on the experiences of other institutions with similar professional development programs.


By the end of this session, participants will be able to:






  • describe the components of a large scale blended learning development program;






  • discuss the successes and challenges of a variety of approaches to training for blended learning;






  • evaluate the implications for practice within one’s own institution.






References



Fink, D. L. & Knight Fink, A. (Eds.). (2009). Designing Courses For Significant Learning: Voices of experience. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


Garrison, D.R. & Vaughan, N.D. (2011). Blended Learning in Higher Education: Framework, Principles, and Guidelines. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design (2nd Ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.



Presenters
NV

Nancy Vezina

Nancy Vézina is the Educational Programs Manager at the University of Ottawa's Teaching and Learning Support Service (TLSS). She has worked in the university environment for more than 20 years. At the TLSS, she is responsible for various projects related to university teaching, such as the implementation of different training programs and special projects.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 60

14:45

CON03.01 - Preparing a 3M National Teaching Fellowship Nomination: Advice from Three Perspectives
Compiling teaching dossiers of any kind is a challenging task, and the 50-page nomination dossier for the 3M National Teaching Fellowships can appear especially daunting, particularly in its emphasis on both excellence in teaching and in educational leadership. As well, 2017 will be the first year that the Fellowship is open to all instructors at the post-secondary level in Canada, so you may have questions about nominating those from the college sector. In this panel session, three veterans of the 3M National Teaching Fellowship selection committee – the Coordinator of the program, the Chair of the Educational Developers’ Caucus, and the chair of the Standing Committee for College Advocacy within STLHE -- will offer their suggestions for prospective nominators or nominees. Among other things, we will look at clarifying and developing the educational leadership section, at identifying what is extraordinary in the nominee’s teaching, and at making the best use of the page count. After participants have the chance to formulate questions in small groups, each panelist will offer three suggestions, and the rest of the time will be devoted to responding to group or individual questions.

Presenters
avatar for Debra Dawson

Debra Dawson

Director, Western University
Debra Dawson, Chair of the Educational Developers Caucus, is the Director of both the Teaching Support Centre and the Centre for Research on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education at Western University in London, Canada. Her primary interests include enhancing student engagement, graduate student development, and competencies of educational developers.
avatar for Tim Loblaw

Tim Loblaw

Coordinator, Teaching & Learning Enhancement, Bow Valley College
Tim Loblaw, Coordinator, Teaching & Learning Enhancement at Bow Valley College, brings expertise in educational development, which includes 18 years' experience in facilitation, instructional strategies and curriculum design. Tim is also the chair of the Standing Committee for College Advocacy within STLHE, and treasurer of the Educational Developers Caucus.
avatar for Shannon Murray

Shannon Murray

University of Prince Edward Island
Shannon Murray is a professor of Renaissance Literature at UPEI, a 3M National Teaching Fellow (2001), and the Coordinator of the 3M NTF. For the past 15 years, she has facilitated the Faculty Development Summer Institute on Active Learning. |


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 37

14:45

CON03.08 - (Teaching) Fellowship of the Ring: A Journey of Common Purpose to Lead Educational Change
The deliverables of education are under significant scrutiny in today’s educational and career market. Educational leadership has emerged at institutions of higher education to help shape the nature and delivery of educational experiences with the goal of supporting and expanding distributed leadership for teaching and learning among peers and across the institution. The objective of this workshop is to share experiences of embedded educational development; specifically, the evolution of leadership identities that draw on the qualities, characteristics and social capital of highly effective and prominent teachers. Teaching fellows representing three separate and uniquely positioned institutions in southwestern Ontario will share their experiences with embedded educational leadership and its impact on student experience and resonance with instructional colleagues.

Participants will engage in conversational leadership in a world café™ setting to network among one another and harvest from the collective effort, a sense of engagement with educational change and a means by which to envision change at their own institutions. Pressing trigger questions such as (1) what are our educational crossroads today; (2) How can educational leadership help innovate education; and (3) does educational leadership influence academic institution administration will be explored. The workshop is intended to foster the development of a relationship between educational leaders, instructors and students, creating opportunities for the exploration and distribution of knowledge that will help build and promote a shared vision of education and learning.

Presenters
DM

David M. Andrews

Dr. Andrews is the Department Head for and Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Windsor. In 2014, he transitioned from his position as a University of Windsor Research Leadership Chair to his current position as a Teaching Leadership Chair for the Faculty of Human Kinetics. His main interests in teaching and learning scholarship include the use of research and peer feedback to enhance teaching practices.
KA

Kelly Anthony

Kelly Anthony, PhD. is a lecturer in the School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo. She is the first Teaching Fellow for the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences (AHS) and has received Waterloo’s Distinguished Teaching Award. She is passionate about engaging students and experiential learning.
avatar for Daniel Belliveau

Daniel Belliveau

Director, School of Health Studies, Western University
A Teaching Fellow of Western’s Teaching Support Centre, Dan Belliveau is an associate professor and Undergraduate Chair in the School of Health Studies at Western University. His current interests focus on the interplay between competition and collaboration in learning and how students transition to high education from high school.
avatar for Judy AK Bornais

Judy AK Bornais

Experiential Learning Specialist, Teaching Leadership Chair, University of Windsor
Judy Bornais is currently an Experiential Learning Specialist with the Faculty of Nursing. She feels that teaching has been at the core of her work as a practitioner and academic. Teaching nursing students appealed to Judy as an opportunity to make a broader contribution to health care.
CR

Chitra Rangan

Dr. Chitra Rangan is Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Windsor, and is one of the inaugural cohort of Teaching Leadership Chairs at the University. She chairs the Community of Practice named PEARL (Promoters of Experiential and Active, Research-based Learning), and is the recipient of the 2015 Canadian Association of Physicists' Medal for Excellence in Undergraduate Physics Teaching.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 61

14:45

CON03.12 - The Evolution and Impact of a 30 Year Partnership - The 3M National Teaching Fellowship Program
The 3M National Teaching Fellowship program has a rich history in Canada as the premier teaching award coveted by professors and post-secondary institutions alike. This program was developed in 1985 through a unique partnership with the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE) and 3M Canada. Over time, it has evolved into one of the most successful public/private partnerships in Canada. Our session highlights this evolution and we provide an overview of our three year study on the impact of the 3MNTF program. During our study, we have collected and analyzed data regarding the impact of the 3M National Teaching Fellowship through focus groups, a national survey, and the collection of archival material. We invite you to learn more about the 3M National Teaching Fellowship program and the unique impact this partnership has had on STLHE and the teaching and learning landscape across Canada.

Presenters
avatar for Arshad Ahmad

Arshad Ahmad

Associate Vice-President, Teaching and Learning & Director, MIIETL, McMaster University
Dr. Arshad Ahmad is the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning and Director of Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning (MIIETL) at McMaster University. He is the Past Coordinator of the 3MNTF program and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past President of STLHE.
RS

Ron Smith

Concordia Univeristy
Dr. Ron Smith is a Professor Emeritus, Education Department Concordia University and a 3M National Teaching Fellow. He is the Past-Chair of the 3M Council and has served on the adjudication for the 3M.
DS

Denise Stockley

Professor and Scholar in Higher Education, Queen's University
Dr. Denise Stockley is a Professor and Scholar in Higher Education with the Office of the Provost (Teaching and Learning Portfolio), seconded to the Faculty of Health Sciences, and cross-appointed to the Faculty of Education. She is the past Chair of the Awards Portfolio for STLHE and the current Vice-President of STLHE.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 146

14:45

CON03.02 - What Value does a university add to learning in the age of MOOCs? (Sponsored by Nelson Education)

The breathtaking rise, decline and reprise of Massive Open Online Courses has provided many lessons on the use of technology-enabled learning. On its own, learning technology is not a panacea. Rather, courses must thoughtfully integrate technology with quality face-to-face instruction time to create a blended learning model that provides students with the knowledge, skills and motivation to meet academic goals. We will discuss how blending learning technology with teaching raises the stakes for both instructors and students.


Presenters
JK

Joe Kim

Joe Kim is an Associate Professor in Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University and is actively involved in the scholarship of teaching and learning. He coordinates the innovative McMaster Introductory Psychology program which combines traditional lectures with interactive on-line resources and small group tutorials. The program has been prominently featured in Maclean’s, Globe and Mail, Toronto Star and numerous education... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 54A

14:45

CON03.05 - The Case for Social Annotation: Co-Reading in Real Time
One of the foundations of literary study is close reading, that is, the careful study of word choice, punctuation, metrics, figurative language, allusion, et cetera, designed to map the polysemy or multiple meanings of a text. In lecture, we often attempt to model this kind of thinking so that students can practice it in their own reading. But what if we could demonstrate even more vividly, through shared digital documents, how scholarly reading is performed? What if we could stage the practice of textual annotation on-screen and offer students a way to participate in reflection collectively?


I propose to demonstrate how instructors might take advantage of sharing documents to design class activities around annotation and close reading. Following a series of historical case studies in social annotation, we will proceed to annotate a poem in real-time, before ending with a reflection on the pedagogical potential for in-class instructor-student collaborations.


In this interactive workshop, I will begin by offering a 10 to 15-minute historical overview of active reading, highlighting examples from the long history of individual and social annotation. Case studies to be discussed include the circle of astronomers who socially annotated Copernicus’ works, the annotated works of Northrop Frye, as well as some recent digital experiments in crowd-sourced annotation. From here, I will turn to the demonstration outlined above, asking a select number of audience members to co-annotate a modern poem with me in real time for 10-15 minutes. Finally, I will offer a reflective rationale for social annotation, while asking broader questions on what we mean by reading and how we evaluate the middle ground between silent reading and composition.

Presenters
SS

Scott Schofield

Scott Schofield is Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Huron University College at Western University. An Early modern scholar, his research is in the history and future of reading with recent articles on “The Digital Book”, social annotation and Shakespeare’s reading practices.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 58

14:45

CON03.15 - Designing Innovative, Technology-Rich, Collaborative Active Learning Classrooms: Lessons from an eight-year design-based research initiative at Dawson College
Specialized Active Learning Classrooms (ALCs) that are designed to leverage the benefits of Active Learning strategies are spreading across college and university campuses worldwide. These student-centred learning spaces are designed to offer, among other things, better opportunities for collective problem solving, confronting ineffective strategies and misconceptions, and providing collaborative work opportunities for students.

Dawson College began developing Active Learning Classrooms in 2008 and has been recognized for the original and innovative design of its technology-rich SMART Classrooms, the development of complementary low-tech ALCs, and our use of a community of practice model for fostering and sustaining pedagogical change.

Recognizing that design and purpose are different sides of the same coin, our room designs are distinct in two important ways: First, they focus on making the process of knowledge construction by student groups visible, public, and dynamic, and; Second, they involve an innovative table design.

Importantly, the development of our room designs has followed an iterative model of change that is guided by research and driven by both practitioners and researchers. This process puts evidence, collaboration and notions of sustainability at the centre of the development process.

In this session, we will engage participants in the design of active learning classrooms (come ready to do some designing!) and highlight the salient design features of our rooms. We will also discuss the iterative, evidence-based process of our classroom development and review our the community of practice model. Lastly, we will share some of the lessons and research that have come from our efforts.

Please note that this session will take place in the Western Active Learning Space (WALS), which provides a rich opportunity for engaging participants and for reflecting in a meaningful way on various Active Learning Classroom design features.

Presenters
avatar for Chris Whittaker

Chris Whittaker

Chris Whittaker, physics faculty and educational researcher at Dawson College. B.Sc & M.Sc. Engineering Physics (Queen's), MSW (U Toronto), and currently a PhD student in Didactics, Faculty of Education at Université de Montréal. Collaborator on consecutive research grants investigating innovations in techno-pedagogy and student-centered learning. Co-coordinator of Dawson’s Active Learning Community program.

Additional Authors
EC

Elizabeth Charles

Elizabeth S. Charles, faculty-researcher at Dawson College, Montreal, Qc. Ph.D. in Educational Technology. Director of the Supporting Active Learning and Technological Innovation in Studies in Education (SALTISE), a community of practice involving over 15 post-secondary institutions across Montreal and the regions. Principal Investigator on consecutive grants focused on techno-pedagogical innovations.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 66 (WALS, Sponsored by Nelson)

14:45

CON03.16 - Flipped and blended courses in lecture and active learning classrooms: Structure and evaluation
*** NEW: Coming to the presentation? Please try to watch this video ahead of time on my flipped and blended class structure: https://youtu.be/HqdOLDbyrGE (there will not be a test).
Here's one on the evaluation I did of my flipped courses:  https://youtu.be/Xjuv_cmHcVY


To promote student learning and more actively engage students in science practices (NRC, 2012), I flipped a number of undergraduate chemistry courses (17–420 students) in 2013–2015 (Flynn, 2015). Lectures became short online videos; class time was dedicated to interactive activities, which were taught in auditoriums (large classes) and uOttawa’s active learning classroom (small classes). To structure the courses, I analyzed each course’s intended learning outcomes (ILOs) to decide which course components would be delivered online and which would be addressed in class. I created short (2–15 min) videos to replace lectures and designed the online and in-class learning activities, all aligned with the ILOs; assessment was also aligned with the ILOs. This format empowered learners and provided multiple opportunities for students to construct their own knowledge in a social setting and give and receive feedback (Schuh, 2003; Vygotsky, 1978). In 2015–2016, other professors in our Department adopted this course model.


I conducted a learning evaluation to determine the impact of the new course structure, using Guskey’s (2002) evaluation model. Students’ grades, withdrawal rates, and failure rates were compared between courses that had a flipped model and courses taught in previous years in a lecture format. The findings revealed statistically significant higher grades and lower withdrawal and failure rates in the flipped courses, although a causal link to the new flipped class format could not be concluded.


In this session, I will explain the flipped course structure, discuss the students’ and professors’ perspectives, describe the results of the educational evaluation, and situate the findings in the context of other flipped course research. Session participants will plan part of a flipped course using one of their own course-level or section/module-level learning outcomes.


Flynn, A. B. (2015). Structure And Evaluation Of Flipped Chemistry Courses: Organic & Spectroscopy, Large And Small, First To Third Year, English And French. Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 16, 198–211. http://doi.org/10.1039/C4RP00224E


Guskey, T. R. (2002). Does It Make a Difference? Evaluating Professional Development. Educational Leadership, 59(6), 45–51. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar02/vol59/num06/Does-It-Make-a-Difference%C2%A2-Evaluating-Professional-Development.aspx


Schuh, K. L. (2003). Knowledge construction in the learner-centered classroom. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95(2), 426–442. http://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.95.2.426


Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in Society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.



Presenters
avatar for Alison Flynn

Alison Flynn

Associate Professor, University of Ottawa
Alison Flynn, Ph.D. (Chemistry), is an Associate Professor in uOttawa's Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences who conducts Chemistry Education Research. Her initiatives include flipped courses, online learning tools, and a new organic chemistry curriculum. Her awards have included the Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning and the Canadian Network for Innovation’s Award of Excellence.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
Weldon Library 121 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

14:45

CON03.09 - Diamonds are your best friend: Enabling students’ voices and insights on learning spaces using a participatory design approach
Working with a premise that the teaching and learning environment is impacted by the physical environment (Tanner, 2000; Christensen Hughes, 2002) and in an effort to effect change, a group of educators from Carleton University conducted an environmental scan of the quality of university learning spaces. Studies that examine student experience of the physical university space are rather lacking (Cox, 2011), and “the creation and re-creation of learning spaces is vital for the survival of the academic community” (Savin-Baden, 2008, p.2). As an issue, one of our main goals is to improve these spaces through a participatory culture for discussion and action, in which students' voices are heard and respected.

This hands-on session will begin with a description of the design, rationale and findings of our study. This will be followed by an opportunity for participants to experience the diamond ranking activity used with 12 student focus groups and one of our research methods. The diamond activity engaged students in small groups as they negotiated and ranked different classroom amenities, such as space, seating, and accessibility. According to Clark (2012), the diamond activity is “praised for facilitating talk around a specific topic”; its strength is in requiring us “to make explicit the overarching relationships by which we organize knowledge” (p. 223).

The session will conclude with a 15-minute debriefing where participants will have an opportunity to reflect about how this “thinking skills tool” (Rockett & Percival, 2002) can be applied in their respective settings.

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

1. Appreciate the importance of spaces for students’ learning;

2. Describe the diamond activity;

3. Assess advantages of using the activity as a research or teaching tool;

4. Reflect on ways in which the activity can be applied in their own contexts.

References
Christensen Hughes, J. (2002). Developing a classroom vision and implementation plan. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2002, 92, 63-72.

Clark, J. (2012). Using diamond ranking as visual cues to engage young people in the research process. Qualitative Research Journal, 2, 222-237.

Cox, A. (2011). Students’ experience of university space: An exploratory study. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 23, 197 – 207.

Rockett, M. & Percival, S. (2002). Thinking for learning. Stafford: Network Educational Press.

Savin-Baden, M. (2008). Learning spaces: Creating opportunities for knowledge creation in academic life. Berkshire, England: McGraw Hill.

Tanner, C. K. (2000). The influence of school architecture on academic achievement. Journal of Educational Administration, 38, 309-330.

Presenters
avatar for Peggy Hartwick

Peggy Hartwick

Instructor, Carleton University
Peggy was a recipient of the 2015 Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning. She is an Instructor and PhD student in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. As a passionate educator who cares deeply about her students’ learning and success, she thoughtfully blends technology and pedagogy to create safe, authentic and engaging learning opportunities for her students.
BH

Beth Hughes

Beth Hughes is an Instructor in the Centre for Initiatives at Carleton University. She teaches at-risk students in the Enriched Support Program in their first year. She uses pedagogically sound and innovative strategies for encouraging students’ engagement, such as coordinating more experienced students as academic coaches to support first year students in their academic writing and reading
avatar for Patrick Lyons

Patrick Lyons

Director, Teaching and Learning, Carleton University
Patrick Lyons is the Director, Teaching and Learning in the Office of the Associate Vice-President Teaching and Learning at Carleton University. He is responsible for the leadership and direction for Carleton’s initiatives in blended and online learning, educational development and teaching and learning technologies.
DP

Dragana Polovina-Vukovic

Dragana Polovina-Vukovic is Instructional Design and Research Facilitator, Educational Development Centre at Carleton University. Dragana’s interest is in enhancing educational practices in postsecondary education. She has published articles in this field and presented at various conferences.

Additional Authors
CS

Cheryl Schramm

Cheryl Schramm teaches Systems & Computer Engineering, specifically web and mobile programming, and embedded computer systems. She is an awarded teacher, known for her innovative teaching strategies and interest in interdisciplinary projects. Cheryl is an active advocate and leader in engineering education research, having recently earned a part-time Masters of Education.
FR

Flavia Renon

Flavia Renon is a Reference/Instruction Librarian for psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience and education at Carleton University. Her current areas of research include: creativity and design thinking across the disciplines, self-study in professional practice, personal learning environments (PLEs) and lifelong learning, libraries as learning spaces and living laboratories.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 63

14:45

CON03.11 - Making the implicit explicit: A strategy for developing doctoral writing skills
This workshop will focus on the conference theme of partnership (doctoral students and generic learning developers) and how it can contribute to student success. Since the late 1990s many factors have affected doctoral education, including the significant increase in enrolments and the diversification of the student body (for example, age, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds). Nevertheless, in many disciplines doctoral students are still expected to master the writing conventions of their research communities through observation or trial and error. More worrying, supervisors are often at a loss as to how to assist students with their written work, which can result in vague or incomplete writing advice. Recognizing a need for writing development, most universities provide generic, one-to-one support for doctoral students. Although such sessions are useful, an individualized approach is time-consuming and misses an essential component in writing development – the use of language and group activities to both encourage and mediate learning. It was this understanding that led to the establishment of our weekly, cross-disciplinary conversation about writing programme, the Doctoral Writing Conversation (DWC) at the University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. This workshop will begin with a brief description of the DWC, and the overall goals of our dialogic approaches will be described. Participants will then complete, one of the activities we use to help students become aware of, and understand academic voice – the ability to communicate complex research ideas in a clear, well-organized, and academically robust manner. Intended learning outcomes of the workshop include recognition and understanding not only of the concept of academic voice, but also how a generic, dialogic writing development programme can be used to help doctoral students become empowered as independent writers.

Presenters
avatar for E_Marcia Johnson

E_Marcia Johnson

Director, Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning, University of Waikato
Dr Marcia Johnson is the Director of the Centre for Tertiary Teaching & Learning at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. Coming from a background in eLearning and Applied Linguistics, Marcia has introduced a number of cross-disciplinary, cohort-based initiatives to improve the student experience of learning, particularly doctoral writing.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 67

14:45

CON03.04 - Direct Instructions (DI) versus Productive Failure (PF) – Best practices for interactive in-class activities.
Use of learning activities to engage students during face-to-face time is on the rise as many educators in all STEM disciplines are incorporating active learning strategies in the classroom. In-class activities however, are not all created equal. The learning activities need to ensure that they integrate the factors that not only engage students with the material but also motivate students to learn. Motivated learners are empowered learners who are more likely to stick with their learning. Our data from an introductory biology course taught at a research-intensive university suggest that student learning and long-term retention vary with the type of in-class activities students engage with in a topic-specific manner. In-class activities, based on the two design principles, Direct Instructions (DI) (Hattie. 2009), and Productive Failure (PF) (Kapur, 2015), were introduced and investigated in our study. Significant differences in student performance were documented for three topics used in the study. While better long-term retention, was observed for the in-class activity with the DI approach for one of the topics, student performance was better with the in-class activity that incorporated the PF approach for the other two topics. Best practices for practicality of implementation and promoting student motivation by these approaches will be discussed.

Presenters
avatar for Sunita Chowrira

Sunita Chowrira

Senior Instructor, University of British Columbia
Senior Instructor, Department of Botany/Biology; Director Combined Major in Science, Faculty of Science, UBC
avatar for Karen Smith

Karen Smith

Lecturer, University of British Columbia - Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology
Lecturer, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Science, UBC


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 56

14:45

CON03.06 - You've been EduCATEd! Building Community, Supporting SoTL Scholars and Scholarship
In the Fall of 2015, the Teaching Commons at York University launched a new course with a specific focus on SoTL in an effort to promote pedagogic research across the institution, contribute to the enhancement of the student experience, and to make visible the ways in which university teachers can research their own classroom activities. EduCATE, the Education, Curriculum, And Teaching Excellence course, includes university teachers representing a variety of disciplines, who are each engaging in a SoTL project.

In this session panellists share reflections of EduCATE and the community that they have forged within the course context. Each speaker will describe their SoTL projects, insights they have gleaned as a result of their participation, and how the course has helped them in doing this research. The presenters direct analytic attention to SoTL in their varying teaching contexts: a) information literacy from the perspective of students, teachers and librarians to learn how prepared grade twelve students are for the demands of university-level research; b) the effectiveness of slide-design on student learning and retention; c) how motivation assessments in the classroom can be used to improve course design; d) student centered curriculum in critical thinking classes and their effect on course planning and pedagogy, and; e) the use of social media in the classroom as tools to promote critical thinking. The combined use of qualitative and quantitative research methods enable important insights into varying teaching and learning processes that often remain invisible to students, administrators, and others outside of the classroom.

By the end of this session participants will gain fresh insights into doing and supporting SoTL research having listened to presentations by participants in EduCATE. Additionally, participants will have opportunities to engage in discussion of key themes and dialogue about supporting SoTL in respective institutions.

Presenters
LC

Linda Carozza

Linda Carozza teaches in the Philosophy Department at York University. Her teaching and research interests include Argumentation Theory, Critical Thinking, Personality Theory, Restorative Justice, and Feminist Theory. More recently she has been reviewing Critical Thinking from the lens of pedagogical efficacy.
JF

Jessica Flake

Jessica is a postdoctoral fellow in the Psychology department at York University. Her main area of research is in quantitative methods but is keen to study student motivation and motivation assessment tools in gatekeeper courses.
MF

Mandy Frake-Mistak

York University
Mandy Frake-Mistak (Session Organizer/Chair): Educational developer with the Teaching Commons at York University. With a research background in the political economy of HE, and as an ISW Trainer and Facilitator, she leads faculty courses/workshops on teaching and SoTL, and co-leads graduate student program initiatives. She is on the 3M National Student Fellowship coordination team.
KG

Kalina Grewal

Kalina Grewal is the Anthropology, Sociology & Gender Studies Librarian at York University Libraries. She is currently doing research on how the library can build relationships with its larger communities and how aware high school students are of information literacy concepts.

Additional Authors
BC

Bridget Cauthery

Bridget teaches in the Dance Department at York University and in the Theatre School at Ryerson University. She has presented internationally at conferences and is well published. In 2014 Bridget won the inaugural e-learning teaching award in the School of Arts, Media, Performance and Design at York University.
JP

Justin Podur

Justin Podur is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University. His main areas of teaching and research are GIS, mathematical modeling , forest fires, landscape ecology , urban wildlife ecology, and political conflicts.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 59

14:45

CON03.10 - Empowering Learners with ePortfolios: Harnessing the “Evidence of Experience” to Illuminate Learner Pathways
Learners in the 21st century are expected to acquire disciplinary (and even
interdisciplinary) knowledge, skills, and abilities and to integrate their learning in different situations and across their learning careers. Yet often the curriculum does not provide opportunities for learners to document what they know, understand, and are able to do beyond traditional disciplinary concepts and skills, neglecting the learning that happens outside the classroom. Electronic portfolios (ePortfolios), when applied as a pedagogy (Catalyst for Learning), provide learners with opportunities to create different representations of their various learning experiences (academic, workplace, community), and make visible the authentic “evidence of [their] experience” (Scott, 1991). Empowering learners to reflect on their various learning experiences to discover their own pathway (Penny Light et. al, 2012; Penny Light, 2015) is at the heart of this pedagogy and allows them to become adept at managing complexity, tolerating ambiguity, and valuing others (Kuh, 2009) as they develop their intellectual identities. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to ePortfolio initiatives and learning activities that highlight the affordances of this pedagogical approach and to an ePortfolio Implementation Framework (Penny Light et. al., 2012) that has been used internationally to effect curricular change. Participants will leave with resources to enable them to continue to reflect on this approach for implementation on their own campuses.


This session has been designed so that participants will have an opportunity to:




  • Identify the benefits of ePortfolio pedagogy and extrapolate ways to use the ePortfolio Implementation Framework in their own context; 



  • Identify opportunities in their curriculum where ePortfolio activities can enable learners to make connections between their various learning experiences; 



  • Reflect on ways to effect change in higher education curriculum and assessment design using ePortfolios. 






Presenters
avatar for Tracy Penny Light

Tracy Penny Light

Executive Director, Centre for Student Engagement and Learning Innovation, Thompson Rivers Universtity
Tracy Penny Light is Executive Director of the Centre for Student Engagement and Learning Innovation at Thompson Rivers University, and former Director of the Women's Studies program at the University of Waterloo.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 65

14:45

CON03.14 - Putting Student Learning First: Strategies for Librarian-Faculty Collaboration
Canadian universities are emphasizing degree-level learning outcomes, with the goal of student lifelong learning and success. As a result, collaborating with others is increasingly important: rather than having to ‘do it all’, working together lets us have an (even more) significant impact on student learning. This workshop re-defines a common campus partnership: that of librarians and teaching faculty. Historically, faculty might invite librarians into class for a database demonstration or to discuss the dangers of plagiarism. While such sessions have their place, new opportunities place student learning at the centre of the conversation. For example, have you developed a new definition of information literacy or is media literacy embedded in your curriculum? How has the development of degree-level learning outcomes led to stronger ties between the library and academic departments? What advice do you have for those who want to spark new relationships? Through a discussion-based approach, participants will generate ideas for successful collaborations, whether in individual lessons or courses, across modules or entire degrees, as well as in our students’ co-curricular opportunities. Come to this workshop prepared to collaborate and create an artifact of exciting and potential partnerships between faculty and librarians - all with the goal of placing student success first.


Learning Outcomes


By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
a. Identify existing and potential partnership opportunities between librarians and faculty on their campuses
b. Articulate how collaboration between librarians and faculty is beneficial for our students’ learning and lifelong success

Presenters
HC

Heather Campbell

Heather Campbell has been with Brescia University College, the all-women's university affiliated with Western, for the past ten years. She previously served as their Learning and Curriculum Support Librarian and now holds the role of Associate Director of Brescia’s Advanced Learning and Teaching Centre.
avatar for Kim McPhee

Kim McPhee

Western University
Kim McPhee is Teaching & Learning Librarian at Western University. She is focused on leading the development of campus-wide information literacy learning outcomes and working with colleagues to embed 21st century literacies in the curriculum.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
Weldon Library 258

14:45

CON03.13 - Graduate Students as Educational Leaders: Transforming Departmental Teaching Cultures through the Lead TA Program
An emerging trend in graduate teaching assistant (GTA) training in Canada is the development of graduate student peer networks – such as “Lead TA Programs” – that enhance the teaching practices of GTAs at a disciplinary level. In this session, we will share the preliminary findings of a mixed method study we conducted to evaluate the impact of a Lead TA program during its pilot implementation stage at a large Ontario university.


This first purpose of this session is to share strategies on how to support graduate students for roles in educational leadership. To this end, two Lead TAs will offer their experiences of the program as case studies in order to shed insight on the factors that resulted in both their success and challenges. The second purpose of this session is to collaboratively brainstorm potential solutions to the attendant challenges of empowering graduate students as change agents within departmental teaching cultures through a group discussion. Participants will leave the session with concrete examples of innovative discipline-specific TA training activities that could be implemented at their own institutions.

Presenters
MA

Melanie-Anne Atkins

Melanie-Anne Atkins is a PhD candidate in Applied Psychology at Western University's Faculty of Education. Her research and professional interests include mental health and wellness, student engagement and retention, knowledge mobilization, curriculum development, and instructional design.
AH

Aisha Haque

Western University
Aisha Haque is a Language and Communication Instructor at Western University where she designs programs to support graduate student development. Aisha also sits on the executive committee of the Teaching Assistant and Graduate Student Advancement (TAGSA) special interest group of STLHE and teaches courses on Bollywood Cinema at Fanshawe College.
MJ

Melissa Jacquart

Melissa Jacquart is a PhD candidate in the Philosophy Department at the Western University, and a resident member of the Rotman Institute of Philosophy, specializing in the philosophy of science. She also works for Western’s Teaching Support Centre as a TA Training Program Instructor.
KM

Ken Meadows

Ken N. Meadows is an educational researcher with the Teaching Support Centre and a researcher with the Centre for Research on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education at Western University, and the managing editor of The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning._x000D_


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
UCC 315 (Council Chambers)

14:45

CON03.19 - Publish & Flourish: Become a Prolific Scholar
Increase your scholarly productivity by a factor of three. Write scholarship that is clearer, better organized, and more compelling. Learn to work smarter, not harder. Many scholarly writers are educated at the School of Hard Knocks, but it’s not the only school, or even the best. Much is known about how to become a better, more prolific scholar and anybody can. Research points to specific steps faculty and graduate students can take to become better, more prolific scholars. Participants in this workshop will learn how to:






  • Differentiate between the urgent and the important (Covey, 2013)


  • Write daily for 15 to 30 minutes (Boice, 2000).


  • Record minutes spent writing—and share those records daily (Boice, 2000).


  • Write from the first day of your research project (McCloskey, 1999).


  • Post your thesis on the wall and write to it (Booth, Colomb & Williams, 2008).


  • Organize your paper around a template (Kliewer, 2005).


  • Revise paragraphs around key or topic sentences (Booth, Colomb & Williams, 2008).


  • Revise papers around key or topic sentences, which, when listed together make an after-the-fact outline (Booth, Colomb & Williams, 2008).


  • Share early drafts with non-experts and later drafts with experts (Becker, 2007).


  • Learn how to listen (Becker, 2007).


  • Read your prose out loud (McCloskey, 1999).


  • Kick it out the door and make ’em say “no” (Becker, 2007).






Participants in a program based on these steps logged their writing minutes in a Google spreadsheet, which showed that they wrote an average of thirty minutes a day for four days per week and which resulted in tripled writing productivity. Participants also improved the quality of their manuscripts by revising their prose around key or topic sentences and by getting feedback in weekly writing groups (Gray and Birch, 2000; Gray, Madson and Jackson in progress).

Presenters
avatar for Tara Gray

Tara Gray

Tara Gray serves as associate professor of criminal justice and as founding director of the Teaching Academy at New Mexico State University (NMSU). Tara has presented faculty development workshops to 10,000 participants at more than 120 venues, in thirty-five of the United States, and in Canada, Thailand, Guatemala, Mexico, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 14:45 - 15:35
Mustang Lounge (UCC) Western University

15:45

15:45

CON04.03 - Interact & engage students with real time assessments, for real results (Sponsored by Turning Technologies Canada)
Presenters
JM

Jeff Monger

Senior Technology Consultant, Turning Technologies
avatar for Matthew Saunderson

Matthew Saunderson

Sr. Account Executive, Turning technologies Canada
Senior Technology Consultant, Turning Technologies


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 54B

15:45

CON04.01 - Empowering Emerging HR Professionals to Create Innovative e-Learning Modules: Challenges, Opportunities and Learning Transfer
In the past decade, the use of technology to facilitate learning is arguably one of the most significant trends impacting educational institutions and workplaces in Canada. Post secondary institutions and organizations are increasingly taking greater advantage of new technologies to deliver better education and improve workplace training. Research demonstrates that over 77 percent of organizations believe that e-learning is becoming more important strategically to the learning strategy within their organizations (Saks & Haccoun, 2016). Students who study human resources are increasingly being called upon to expand their focus on the technologies that drive change within organizations through effective training and development strategies (Card & Sivak, 2014).


Students in a graduate certificate Human Resources program were given the opportunity to develop the digital competencies that are required in the modern workplace by designing an asynchronous online learning module. In this session we will share our approach to preparing students to facilitate change within organizations by successfully creating online learning modules. Students were able to expand their digital competencies and apply these skills to new contexts, going on to create online modules for another training project working with not-for-profit industry partners. We will share the results of surveys that were completed before and after the semester-long learning experience to explore the students’ self-assessment regarding their motivation to learn new digital competencies, self-efficacy towards achieving their learning goals, and their self-confidence in applying their learning as they move into the workplace.


During this session, participants will have the opportunity to discuss their personal experiences of integrating technologies that support technical competency, explore examples of online learning modules via their mobile devices, and contribute to the development of a collaborative list of resources used to facilitate the creation of online modules.

Presenters
HC

Holly Catalfamo

Holly Catalfamo is a Coordinator and Professor of the Human Resources Management Programs in the School of Business and Management at Niagara College.
avatar for Barbara Smith

Barbara Smith

Niagara College
Barbara Smith is a Professor in the School of Business and Management at Niagara College. She also facilitates online courses for Ontario Learn.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 37

15:45

CON04.04 - Acting out gender: Using theatre of the oppressed to enact a gender studies curriculum
In colleges and universities across Canada, the availability of gender studies courses is increasingly scarce and the recent closures of women’s studies departments only decreases the options for students wishing to explore gender and sexuality issues in nuanced ways as part of their post-secondary education. How do we address, in the first instance, the increasingly significant gap between theories of sex and gender in the academy and the practice of sex and gender education for young people both in high schools (where gender studies curricula exist, but are infrequently offered) and at college/university? In the second instance, how do we encourage the exploration of sex and gender issues in classrooms beyond those dedicated to gender studies?

This session introduces participants to Augusto Boal's Theatre of the Oppressed (1979), a collection of public, performance-based-pedagogy models (PBP), and explores the pedagogical capacity of Theatre of the Oppressed to enact a gender studies curriculum. This session will allow participants to explore their creative side while providing space for critical reflection, self-interrogation and reflexivity. The performative nature of this session will confront the privileged, disembodied ways of learning and knowing that remain entrenched in many K-12 and undergraduate learning environments. This session seeks to demonstrate the power of alternative practices to shape different critical conversations and offer tools for those leading teacher-training sessions on gender studies and related anti-oppression curriculum material.

Presenters
avatar for Danielle Carr

Danielle Carr

Danielle Carr is a Ph.D. candidate at the Faculty of Education in the Critical Policy, Equity and Leadership program. In her 2nd year, Danielle is exploring the use of performance-based pedagogy for enacting critical education and exploring gender issues with youth.

Additional Authors
KS

Kim Solga

Dr. Kim Solga a scholar of urban and feminist performance theory and sexuality and is a pioneer in Western’s new Theatre Studies program. Dr. Solga is an affiliate of the Department of Women’s Studies and Feminist Research and the author of Theatre and Feminism (2015) and Violence Against Women in Early Modern Performance (2009).


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 56

15:45

CON04.07 - Developing a campus-wide service-learning program
Service-learning is one method of experiential learning that has been identified as a high impact practice related to work-integrated learning in Ontario. With this understanding, the Centre for Teaching and Learning at Humber College has included service-learning as one area for growth on campus.

The following session is for participants who want to learn how Humber College went about raising the profile of service-learning on campus, and developing and implementing a service-learning framework for faculty. The session will conclude with a discussion on the successes and challenges faced, and participants will be given an opportunity to provide critical feedback on the process.

Presenters
avatar for Melissa Gallo

Melissa Gallo

Associate Director, Advising and Career Services, Humber College
Melissa Gallo has recently moved into a new role as the Associate Director, Advising and Career Services at Humber College ITAL. Previously, she was working in the Centre for Teaching and Learning at Humber College ITAL as a Faculty Resource Consultant for Service-Learning. In this role she was responsible for researching and developing a framework for promoting service-learning within the curriculum. Ed.D. (Cand.)


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 60

15:45

CON04.19 - Laughing Matters: Humour as a Teaching and Learning Value for Empowerment
This interactive workshop will explore the significance of humour and pedagogy in a variety of post-secondary learning settings. These include large lectures and small group discussions in intramural classrooms, online learning, clinical settings, science labs, community colloquia including members of the public and studio instruction. These learning settings reflect the multidisciplinary specializations of our group, which includes ten faculty members from medicine and surgery, law, business and commerce, physical sciences, social sciences, humanities and music performance. Workshop participants will be encouraged to reflect on actual situations that they have encountered as teachers and learners involving humour. They will also share and consider their own experiences with humour in the classroom.


Student engagement includes empowering learners to be knowledgeable citizens in a variety of social contexts. Teacher-student, student-student connections and student engagement are indeed facilitated by the use of humour in class (Strean 2008, p. 75). Of course, humour is bounded to social, linguistic and cultural perceptions. Nevertheless, it can be used as an effective teaching tool (Berk 1996, p. 72). Humour is a useful pedagogical strategy for introducing and teaching controversial or “sensitive” subject matter. It has the potential to reduce feelings of anxiety and isolation in students and also in the instructor. Humour is also an effective way to bring individuals out of their shells. It helps in reducing classroom tension and actively promotes the retention of subject matter through memorable teaching moments.

The class as a learning community, which includes the teaching team and the students collectively, shares the responsibility for creating and maintaining a safe learning environment in which humour is not used to undermine or demean individuals or specific groups, but rather to strengthen and enrich their individual and collective experience. Humour during controversial discussions often underlies equity issues in the classroom.

Hands on techniques and insights for enhancing student learning and empowerment through the use of humour will be shared.

Topics for discussion will include:
  • Using humour as an icebreaker at the start of courses or to introduce new topics in a course.
  • Exploring cultural differences regarding the use of humour
  • Relatedly, how do we deal with situations of what some might consider to be “inappropriate” laughter which might occur in situations of tension and controversial discussion? Are we equipped as instructors to deal with “emotions” in the classroom including joy or bitter laughter?

References
Berk, Ronald A. (1996). “Student Ratings of 10 Strategies for Using Humor in College Teaching” in Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 7 (3), 71-92.

McGraw, Peter & Warner, Joel (2015). The Humor Code: A Global Search for What Makes Things Funny. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.Strean, William B. (2008). “Evolving Toward Laughter in Learning” in Collected Essays on Learning and Teaching, 1. 75-79.


Presenters
avatar for Patrick Maher

Patrick Maher

Dr. Pat Maher is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Community Studies at Cape Breton University. He is a 3M National Teaching Fellow (2014), Editor of the Journal of Experiential Education and Associate Editor of the Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
JM

Jacqueline Murray

Jacqueline Murray is Professor of History, a 3M National Teaching Fellow and Director of the First-Year Seminar Program at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. She has pioneered and co-authored several publications regarding the use of enquiry-based learning pedagogy, and has provided workshops and continuing education regarding this method internationally. |
avatar for Rosemary Polegato

Rosemary Polegato

Professor, Mount Allison University, The Ron Joyce Centre for Business Studies
Rosemary Polegato is Professor of Commerce at Mount Allison University.
CT

Cameron Tsujita

Cameron Tsujita is Assistant Professor of Paleontology in the Dept of Earth Sciences at Western University.
MV

Maureen Volk

Maureen Volk is Dean pro tempore and Professor of Piano at Memorial University of Newfoundland.
JW

Jonathan White

Jonathan White is Professor & Tom Williams Chair in Surgical Education, Department of Surgery Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta

Additional Authors
CB

Carol B. Duncan

Carol B. Duncan is Professor of Religion and Culture at Wilfrid Laurier University.
DM

Donna Marie Eansor

Donna Marie Eansor is Professor of Law at the University of Windsor's Faculty of Law.
PC

Philippe Caignon

Philippe Caignon is Professor of Translation Studies, Director of the MA program in Translation Studies and the Director of the Centre for Teaching and Learning at Concordia University.
PL

Pippa Lock

Pippa Lock is Assistant Professor of Chemistry at McMaster University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
Mustang Lounge (UCC) Western University

15:45

CON04.12 - Communicating why we do what we do to enable others and effect change in postsecondary education: creating an educational development (ED) philosophy statement
Philosophy statements are prepared to help us communicate a set of beliefs that motivate action (Jenkins, 2011). Teaching philosophy statements have become increasingly embedded in post-secondary education (see for example: Schönwetter et al., 2002). Building upon work by Wright & Miller (2000), ED philosophy statements have been increasingly embraced by educational developers to reflect upon and communicate what our beliefs are about educational development, why we hold these beliefs, and how we translate these beliefs into practice. However, few resources exist to help support educational developers, instructors, and educational leaders in creating an effective philosophy statement that articulates why they do what they do to enable others and effect change in postsecondary education. Based upon resources and activities presented in the inaugural resource guide for the Educational Developers Caucus of Canada (McDonald et al., 2016), this workshop will engage participants in a variety of individual and collaborative activities and provide a clear framework for creating an educational development philosophy statement. By the end of this session, participants will be able to create and/or revise their ED philosophy statement, as well as share resources and provide feedback to help others strengthen their ED philosophy statement.


Jenkins, C. (2011). Authenticity through reflexivity: Connecting teaching philosophy and practice. Australian Journal of Adult Learning, 51, 72-89.




McDonald, J., Kenny, N., Kustra, E., Dawson, D., Iqbal, I., Borin, P., & Chan, J. (2016). Educational Development Guide Series: No. 1. The Educational Developer’s Portfolio. Ottawa, Canada: Educational Developers Caucus.


Schönwetter, D. J., Sokal, L., Friesen, M., & Taylor, L. K. (2002). Teaching philosophies reconsidered: A conceptual model for the development and evaluation of teaching philosophy statements. International Journal for Academic Development, 7(1), 83-97.


Wright, W. A., & Miller, J. E. (2000). The educational developer’s portfolio. International Journal for Academic Development, 5(1), 1-5.

Presenters
avatar for Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny

Natasha Kenny is Director of the Educational Development Unit in the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 146

15:45

CON04.13 - Rethinking course design support for instructors: Multiple perspectives and approaches
Since the publication of Rethinking Teaching in Higher Education: From a Course Design Workshop to a Faculty Development Framework (Saroyan & Amundsen, 2004), many institutions have been inspired to adopt and customize the course design workshop model proposed in the book for their own use. During this session educational developers from three Canadian universities will share how their critical reflection on the workshop model resulted in changes to the original workshop format, duration, and materials. Participants will engage in a similar process of critical reflection whereby they will consider what information they need to inform decision making and affect change.


Drawing on Brookfield’s work (1995), we will use individual and small-group activities and discussion, in which participants will consider how to enhance their programs through the lenses of 1) themselves, 2) instructors, 3) peers, and 4) the literature. Throughout, we will share our tools and encourage participants to consider what issues to explore with their own constituents.


This session will be of interest to educational developers and others who offer curricular support for instructors and academic programs.

Presenters
MS

marcy slapcoff

Marcy Slapcoff is a Senior Academic Associate at McGill’s Teaching and Learning Services. She leads university-wide and faculty-specific teaching and learning projects including the Course Design Workshop.
DS

Denise Stockley

Professor and Scholar in Higher Education, Queen's University
Dr. Denise Stockley is a Professor and Scholar in Higher Education with the Office of the Provost (Teaching and Learning Portfolio), seconded to the Faculty of Health Sciences, and cross-appointed to the Faculty of Education. She is the past Chair of the Awards Portfolio for STLHE and the current Vice-President of STLHE.
MT

Mariela Tovar

Dr. Mariela Tovar is a Senior Academic Associate at McGill’s Teaching and Learning Services. She leads university-wide and faculty-specific teaching and learning projects including the Course Design Workshop.
SF

Sue Fostaty Young

Educational Developer, Queen's University
Sue is an Educational Developer and the Programs Manager of the Queen's University CTL. Her responsibilities include the development and delivery of programming for graduate students' and post-doctoral fellows' teaching development.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 315 (Council Chambers)

15:45

CON04.15 - Reflective Choreography: Construct Mapping to Facilitate Teaching and Student Participation in an Active Learning Space
Abstract: Revised 312 words


Teaching that facilitates active learning requires the instructor to integrate student participation within the classroom space by planning and implementing activities that flow easily from one another and build on knowledge throughout the class session (Slavich and Zimbardo 2012). The authors of this presentation have utilized construct mapping to both organise and implement session activities within an active learning space in a higher educational setting. The construct mapping provides a scaffolding to choreograph the various elements (students, physical space, activities, and time) to create learning sessions that flow well and facilitate learning.


Participants will learn how to use construct mapping to organise an educational session within an alternative learning space. This technique of using construct mapping is particularly useful when instructors are beginning to undertake a shift from passive intake of knowledge to active participation by students (Jennings 2012). In this manner, construct mapping will be presented as a scaffolding approach for the transition of instructional development (NIU FDIDC 2012). Participants will create construct maps that meet their particular educational objectives and use equipment afforded to them by working in the Western Active Learning Space (WALS).


The session will demonstrate how the authors have used construct mapping to facilitate the meta cognitive learning within their own courses. It will include a discussion of specific construct mapping tools which will serve as an added take away to the overall design choreography to facilitate participants’ own application of the approaches demonstrated within the session.


As an example of active learning in practice, the session will build around the use of these techniques. Thus, it is intended to provide participants with a hands on familiarity with the use of construct mapping to provide scaffolding both to transition conventional instructional curricula to use in an active learning classroom and to supplement pedagogy within traditional classrooms for participants wishing to integrate active learning elements into their teaching.

References

Northern Illinois University Faculty Development and Instructional Design Center (2012) http://www.niu.edu/facdev/resources/guide/strategies/instructional_scaffolding_to_improve_learning.pdf

Slavich, G. M., & Zimbardo, P. G. (2012). Transformational teaching: Theoretical underpinnings, basic principles, and core methods. Educ Psychol Rev, 24(4), 569-608. doi:10.1007/s10648-012-9199-6

Jennings, D. (2012) The Use of Concept Maps for Assessment http://www.ucd.ie/t4cms/UCDTLA0040.pdf

 

Spaulding Prezi, pt 1 of the presentation:

https://prezi.com/kfo8j50ql3uj/reflective-course-map-mapping-your-meta-cognition-part-1/

Smith Prezi, pt 2 of presentation:
 https://prezi.com/ioeimit-vnvd/reflective-course-map-mapping-your-meta-cognition-pt2/  



Presenters
avatar for L Graham Smith

L Graham Smith

Associate Profesor, Geography, UWO
Dr. Graham Smith, Geography, UWO is a recipient of the Pleva Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching and the USC Award for Excellence in Teaching. He presently teaches two senior level undergraduate courses using WALS (Geography of Change : Geo 4100 and Philosophy + Methodology of Geography: Geo 4000) and a very popular + large (~640 students per term) general interest course (Geography of Tourism: Geo 2144 ) in both the Fall and Winter... Read More →
SS

Sandi Spaulding

Dr. Sandi Spaulding is a professor in Occupational Therapy at Western University. She teaches in clinical human movement sciences using active learning techniques and a consolidation online course. She has received teaching awards at the faculty level.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 66 (WALS, Sponsored by Nelson)

15:45

CON04.16 - “BASICS” for Alignment of Teaching and Assessing Cognitive Skills
“BASICS” for Alignment of Teaching and Assessing Cognitive Skills


Participants in this active workshop engage with a free, open source web application that is designed to familiarize instructors with criterion-based assessment, and for the development of rubrics for evaluation of student cognitive skill performance. Using the app, participants complete a series of targeted questions about alignment of cognitive skills, the content and context of an assessment, and the desired assessment criteria. The app then outputs an editable analytic rubric that can be tailored to specific needs.


Instructors at post-secondary institutions are increasingly recognizing the importance of developing cognitive skills like critical thinking, creative thinking and problem solving. To achieve this goal some instructors have moved to more student-centered curricula and looked toward performance assessments to elicit and reinforce skills development. This has led to “a new assessment culture aimed at assessing higher order thinking processes and competences” (Jonsson & Svingby, 2007, p.131). By using performance assessment, learners are motivated to demonstrate the application of skills in a meaningful way (Montgomery, 2002).


Participants will reflect on how BASICS can be used in their own context to support instructors to tailor cognitive skill assessment. Together with its associated support materials, BASICS provides a professional development opportunity, empowering instructors to engage in a process of curriculum based backward design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005). By conclusion of this workshop it is intended that participants are able to:




  • Define components of critical thinking, creative thinking and problem solving


  • Describe a performance assessment as it relates to their field


  • Use the BASICS rubric builder to compose a rubric for a performance task


  • Utilize the principles of backward design to reflect on the alignment between the rubric and performance assessment




References


Jonsson, A., & Svingby, G. (2007). The use of scoring rubrics: Reliability, validity and educational consequences. Educational Research Review, 2(2), 130–144.


Montgomery, K. (2002). Authentic tasks and rubrics: Going beyond traditional assessments in college teaching. College Teaching, 50(1), 34–40.


Wiggins, G. P., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design. Ascd. Retrieved from https://books.google.ca/books?hl=en&lr=&id=N2EfKlyUN4QC&oi=fnd&pg=PR6&dq=understanding+by+design&ots=go7Cj7WP0s&sig=NkjhU7ncctQr5oW4hGKYxFZXNvc

Presenters
AL

Andy Leger

Andrew Leger is an educational developer with the Centre for Teaching and Learning. He works closely with faculty and staff on the development of learning spaces, educational technologies and ways to enhance the student and educator experience through the implementation of these resources. Andy helps coordinate the use of the newly renovated active learning classrooms and is a member of the onQ Learning Management System Steering Committee.
NS

Natalie Simper

"Natalie Simper coordinates the Learning Outcomes and Assessment Project, investigating the development and measurement of meta-cognition and cognitive skills with learning outcomes. Natalie comes from an Australian senior-secondary/post-secondary teaching background, with experience at the statewide level in curriculum development, large-scale assessment and evaluation and assessment of outcome-based education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
Weldon Library 121 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

15:45

CON04.06 - Made to Slip: Why Good Initiatives Lose Traction

This session will explore the slipperiness of institutional change – specifically, the factors that make it difficult to introduce, implement, and sustain educational initiatives. As Fullan and Scott (2009) put it, many institutions of higher education are “change averse” in that their structures, processes, and predispositions discourage experimentation and innovation. Even the most change capable of institutions may find certain kinds of projects more difficult to enact, particularly those involving activities that impact people in different roles, at multiple levels, and with conflicting interests.

In research published across Australia and the United Kingdom, post-secondary institutions are beginning to be understood as complex systems within which change is enormously difficult despite mounting and conflicting pressures to become more nimble (Flinn & Mowles, 2014). Evidence suggests that increased awareness of systems, their interdependent networks of individuals, and the dynamic nature of leadership within those networks can enhance the chances of successful change (Mårtensson, Roxå, & Stensaker, 2014; Sterman, 2006). In particular, this approach helps to elucidate how information moves and pools within systems and how this impacts the capacity for change.

Based on institutional and international research on leadership, this interactive session will examine how leaders can create traction for their initiatives through self-reflection, project assessment, and an exploration of institutional context and processes (Bolden, Petrov, & Gosling, 2008; Flinn & Mowles, 2014; Trowler, Saunders, & Knight, 2003; Wright et al., 2014). This exploration of leadership will help participants to better analyze change initiatives, identifying factors making it difficult to introduce, implement, and sustain them, and identify potential next steps in improving the traction of their projects based on that analysis.


Presenters
avatar for Beverley Hamilton

Beverley Hamilton

University of Windsor
Bev Hamilton is the Academic Initiatives Officer in the Provost’s office at the University of Windsor. She undertakes research, projects, and policy development to enhance academic practice and the student experience. She is currently engaged with projects focused on teaching evaluation, institutional leadership capacity, and new faculty development.
JR

Jessica Raffoul

University of Windsor
Jessica Raffoul is an Educational Consultant with the Centre for Teaching and Learning, University of Windsor. She contributes to research, programs, and curricula that support teaching and learning across the University, with a particular focus on the scholarship of teaching and learning, the documentation of instructional excellence, and undergraduate research.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 59

15:45

CON04.05 - Emphasizing reading as pre-class preparation for students in a flipped or blended learning classroom
Scientists establish their ideas and disseminate findings with text. Universities shape both discipline-specific information as well as develop general knowledge and communication skills. Blended and flipped classes rely on a variety of resources, but students tend to feel more confident when provided online videos for support instead of readings. There is tension: can students acquire the needed textbook-reading skills if it is not emphasized, and how do we best engage our students with appropriate out-of-class materials? What role can OERs serve? This session invites instructors to share thoughts about the importance of text literacy in students as well as providing hands-on experience with the free platform Perusall to establish 1) asynchronous collaboration between students on their readings and 2) provide the instructor with summaries that will inform the nature of in-class activities. Participants will then explore the practical aspects of using Academic Reading Circles in the sciences.

Presenters
BM

Brett McCollum

Associate Professor, Mount Royal University
Dr. Brett McCollum is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Mount Royal University, a Nexen Scholar and Apple Distinguished Educator. His publications span a variety of fields including SoTL, interdisciplinary teaching in science and public policy, and the use of the radioactive positive muon as a probe of chemical reactivity.
avatar for Todd Nickle

Todd Nickle

Mount Royal University, Mount Royal University
Dr. Todd Nickle is a Professor of Biology at Mount Royal University. His research has shifted from studying genetics and molecular biology in Arabidopsis mutants to investigating ways to promote active and effective learning in the classroom. He received the ACIFA Award for Innovation in Teaching (2014) and the MRU Distinguished Faculty Award (2015) in recognition of his work in challenging students to take ownership of their own education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 58

15:45

CON04.09 - Student Centered Teaching: When the Students Become the Teachers
“Docendo discimus …By teaching we learn”

In a letter to Lucillius, Seneca the Younger gave voice to a truth which many contemporary professors have affirmed, students learn most deeply when they teach to others the material they are learning (Kirkegard, Gulz & Silvervarg, 2014). When students teach course material, multiple benefits arise: students develop a strong sense of commitment to the subject matter (Miller, Groccias & Miller, 2001); students “actively construct a shared sense of meaning about course concepts with their instructor and teaching partners” (Wagner & Gansermer-Toft, 2005); and students have deeper and more enduring comprehension of the material (Fiorella & Mayer, 2014). Peer to peer teaching occurs when students deliver small sections of course material, when they instruct each other in small groups, when they peer-review each other’s written assignments, when they work with the community beyond the traditional walls of the university, and when they can speak out of their cultural traditions and experiences that are unique to their situation.

The presenters of this session represent a cross-section of disciplines from literature to mathematics. The authors have developed a wide variety of teaching techniques that place students in a “teaching role” including in-class debates, modified team-based-learning, games, and on-line peer reviews of papers. In the opening section of the presentation we will discuss a variety of practical, transferable teaching techniques that allow students to take on a teaching role. Beyond the classroom setting, presenters have also developed forums in which students become active presenters and advocates through community engagement and service learning. Helping students succeed requires that they receive feedback, and during the presentation we will review different techniques of peer-assessment that help students understand how their work as teachers affects others (Boud, Cohen, & Sampson, 1999).

References:

Boud, D., Cohen, R., & Sampson, J. (1999). Peer learning and assessment. Assessment and Evaluation In Higher Education, 24(4), 413.

Fiorella, L., & Mayer, R. E. (2014). Role of expectations and explanations in learning by teaching. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 39, 2, 75-85.

Kirkegaard, C., Gulz, A., & Silvervarg, A. (2014). Introducing a callenging teachable agent. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 8523, 53-62.

Miller, J. E., Groccia, J.E., and Miller, M.S.. (2001). Student-Assisted Teaching. Bolton: Anker Publishing.

Wagner, M., & Gansemer-Topf, A. (2005). Learning by teaching others: A qualitative study exploring the benefits of peer teaching. Landscape Journal, 24(2), 198-208.

Presenters
AB

Ann Bigelow

Ann Bigelow, PhD, Professor, Psychology Department, Program Coordinator Service Learning, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, NS, 2015 3M National Teaching Fellow.
DC

David Creelman

David Creelman teaches English at the University of New Brunswick in Saint John. He uses a variety of group activities and peer-teaching activities to help his students connect with Modern and Canadian texts. 2015 3M National Teaching Fellow.
VJ

Veselin Jungic

Teaching Professor, Simon Fraser University
Veselin Jungic teaches in the Department of Mathematics at Simon Fraser University. Veselin Jungic brings his subject alive for varied audiences – from young to old, from rural to professional, from the most academically challenged to the most advanced students. His No-Fear Mathematics, Math Catcher, Math Girl programs build students’ confidence. 2015 3M National Teaching Fellow.
avatar for Jessica Riddell

Jessica Riddell

Associate Professor, Bishop\'s University
Jessica Riddell is an Associate Professor of Medieval and Renaissance literature. She received the William and Nancy Turner Award for Teaching Excellence and is a 3M NTF (2015). A founding member of the Teaching and Learning Centre (TLC) at Bishop’s, she is acting chair of the TLC and a columnist for University Affairs.
avatar for Jin-Sun Yoon

Jin-Sun Yoon

Teaching Professor, University of Victoria
Jin-Sun Yoon is a Teaching Professor in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria. She received a 3M Teaching Fellowship in 2015. Known for her inclusive pedagogical approaches, social justice activism, and advocacy for educational equity, she champions diversity as a fundamental teaching ethic.

Additional Authors
TC

Étienne Côté

Étienne Côté, teaches at the Atlantic Veterinary College at the University of Prince Edward Island. Etienne Côté teaches with heart, both literally and figuratively. In such complex and intense situations, he wants the student to feel that it is OK not to know, but it is not OK not to care. 2015 3M National Teaching Fellow.
PT

Pamela Toulouse

Pamela Toulouse teaches at the School of Education at Laurentian University. Pamela is a highly respected scholar in the areas of Indigenous student success and interactive pedagogy. She has conducted more than 115 workshops and presentations, helping to guide the Ontario conversation about First Nations, Métis and Inuit education. 2015 3M National Teaching Fellow.
PO

Peter Ostafichuk

Peter Ostafichuk, teaches in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of British Columbia. He was instrumental in transforming elements of the Mechanical Engineering program, and introduced such new features as team-based and project-based learning and organized design competitions involving engineer-client simulations. 2015 3M National Teaching Fellow.
SH

Sara Harris

Sara Harris teaches with Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, at the University of British Columbia. Her use of interactive teaching methods such as i-clickers, peer instruction, and concept sketches helps students learn all they can about climate change. 2015 3M National Teaching Fellow.
SJ

Steve Joordens

Steve Joordens teaches in the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto. Steve Joordens is an educational activist. His technological innovations – peerScholar, mtuner, Digital Labcoat – help students feel like they are part of an intimate discussion, no matter where they are in the world. 2015 3M National Teaching Fellow.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 63

15:45

CON04.10 - Developing Students’ Creative Thinking Skills in the Context of Course Content
Metacognition can be defined as cognition about cognition; or thinking about thinking. For educators it involves helping students become knowledgeable about their cognitive processes (declarative, procedural, conditional knowledge), and how to regulate them (plan, monitor, evaluate) in order learn, make decisions, solve problems, generate ideas and perform other cognitive tasks. Creative metacognition focuses on cognitive tasks that involve generating, choosing and evaluating creative ideas and then apply those ideas to develop products and services, new solutions to problems and other innovative tasks.

The challenge for educators is that course curriculums are already crowded and expecting faculty to teach creative thinking and metacognition, in addition to discipline-specific content, is problematic. Faculty members may be challenged to teach students creative thinking strategies given the content demands and time constraints

Our work teaching business students Design Thinking, and more specifically Human Centered Design (HCD) a variant of Design Thinking, indicates that students can acquire and apply creative thinking and creative metacognition strategies and processes while learning discipline specific knowledge. Within the context of HCD projects, students encounter problematic situations that expose conflicting, paradoxical demands. They must overcome the tendency to engage in either/or thinking and choose generate ideas, solutions, and experiences for the end user that resolve contrary demands.

In an engineering creative problem solving course, creative thinking techniques were introduced and practiced in order to encourage students to consciously and deliberately apply them both course related projects and in their personal challenges.

This session will explore the literature, strategies, methodologies and experiences helping business and engineering students develop creative metacognition. Participants will be expected to share their experiences helping students develop creative metacognition.

Presenters
BM

Bharat Maheshwari

Dr. Bharat Maheshwari is Associate Professor in the Odette School of Business at the University of Windsor. He has a Ph.D. in Management, MBA, and a B.Eng. His research interests include enterprise resource planning systems, supply chain partnerships, IT project management, technology and innovation management, and e-health. He teaches courses in management information systems, project management, and innovation management.
ZP

Zbigniew Pasek

Dr. Zbignew Pasek is Professor in Industrial & Manufacturing Systems Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Windsor. His research interests include industrial automation and controls, work organizations, financial and risk analysis in Engineering, and Engineering education with emphasis on informal engineering education. Dr. Pasek holds a University of Windsor Teaching Leadership Chair in Engineering in recognition of... Read More →
PR

Paul Rousseau

Prof. Paul Rousseau is an educator in the Department of Political Science at the University of Windsor and has experiences teaching in various disciplines and in interdisciplinary collaborations, including a course with Dr. Pasek in creative problem solving with students in the Master of Management Program. He also provides coaching and facilitation support to MBA and undergraduate business students.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 65

15:45

CON04.17 - Engaging Student Leaders through Case Competitions
When developing new programming for students, student affairs professionals may look to each other for innovative ideas. This workshop explores an alternative method for soliciting new program ideas and designs while providing a unique opportunity for students to develop transferable skills. By working through a case-based scenario, students are able to gain valuable experience while at the same time they are helping to inform our direction by offering insights and innovation to the student experience.


A case competition consists of a group of participants who work together over a limited time frame to solve a ‘problem’. Initial rounds include the releasing of the case, followed by a proposal and if selected, a presentation to highlight the group’s approach. This model is versatile in the sense that all students, from various disciplines and faculties, can work together to develop strategies. The case used can be adapted to fit a variety of scenarios. A case may revolve around an issue facing students, gaps in programs or services, perceptions on campus, or accessibility and services. Skills developed from this experience range from problem solving, and critical thinking to effective communication.


This workshop will draw on the experience of the Success Centre Student Leadership Case Competition 2016. Highlights will include the methods used in putting the competition together, evaluation, outcomes, strengths and weaknesses of this approach. Students involved in this event will join in the presentation to add their experiences to the conversation.


This presentation is valuable to anyone seeking to provide unique leadership experience to students and those looking for input and insight from community members.

Presenters
avatar for Meg U'Ren

Meg U'Ren

Transition, Leadership, and Enrichment Program Coordinator, Western University
Staff - Transition, Leadership and Enrichment Program Coordinator with the Student Success Centre at Western University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
Weldon Library 120 (Teaching Support Centre) Western University

15:45

CON04.02 - ePortfolio rubrics: A multidisciplinary, student-centred, faculty developed, open education resource (whew!)
In recent years, ePortfolios have been identified as a student-centred learning tool that can facilitate high impact pedagogical practices (Kuh, 2008). ePortfolio implementation has the potential to encourage learners to reflect on their learning and make connections between and across various experiences and knowledge. For teachers, ePortfolios are a tool they can use to enhance students’ development of the skills, attitudes, and knowledge that form the learning outcomes of specific courses or programs while assessing the degree to which students have met those learning outcomes.

At Carleton, one of the challenges instructors faced when implementing ePortfolios at the course level was the question of how to evaluate the work students produced. Because ePortfolios enable students to demonstrate their learning using unique, multimodal artifacts, the instructors found it difficult to reliably assess the variety of unique expressions of learning found in their students’ portfolios. The instructors found that already available rubrics were either designed for program level portfolios, included too much course-specific content, or were not open access. In response, our ePortfolio Faculty Learning community drafted an interactive, modifiable rubric that faculty from multiple disciplines can easily adapt to grade their students’ portfolios. The structure and content of the rubric was drawn from existing resources, ePortfolio research, and instructors’ personal insights from using ePortfolios in their courses. Faculty have applied these rubrics successfully adapting them to their particular courses and educational needs.

Participants in this session will work in small groups to apply the rubric to examples of student ePortfolios from different disciplines and levels of study. The rubrics will be shared as an open education resource (OER).

References
American Association of Colleges and Universities (2009). VALUE Rubrics. Retrieved from https://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics

Chen, H. L., & Mazow, C. (2002). Electronic learning portfolios and student affairs. NASPA NetResults.

Connect to Learning (2014). Catalyst for learning. Retrieved from: http://c2l.mcnrc.org/g

Kuh, G. D. (2008). Excerpt from High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter. Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Light, T. P., Chen, H. L., & Ittelson, J. C. (2011). Documenting learning with ePortfolios: A guide for college instructors. John Wiley & Sons.

Presenters
avatar for Allie Davidson

Allie Davidson

EdTech Development Coordinator, Carleton University
Allie Davidson is a EdTech development coordinator at Carleton University’s Educational Development Centre. She is leading the project of ePortfolio adoption at the University and working closely with faculty and students to identify the impediments to ePortfolio adoption, the benefits for student learning, and effective practices in implementation.
avatar for Peggy Hartwick

Peggy Hartwick

Instructor, Carleton University
Peggy was a recipient of the 2015 Brightspace Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning. She is an Instructor and PhD student in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. As a passionate educator who cares deeply about her students’ learning and success, she thoughtfully blends technology and pedagogy to create safe, authentic and engaging learning opportunities for her students.
BH

Beth Hughes

Beth Hughes is an Instructor in the Centre for Initiatives at Carleton University. She teaches at-risk students in the Enriched Support Program in their first year. She uses pedagogically sound and innovative strategies for encouraging students’ engagement, such as coordinating more experienced students as academic coaches to support first year students in their academic writing and reading
SS

Samah Sabra

Samah is an educational developer and contract instructor at Carleton University. Her areas of interest are inclusive educational practices, experiential education, and communities of practice. In a past life, her research focused on feminist, queer, and anti-racist theories and methodologies. Her educational development practices are informed by these theories.
RT

Rachelle Thibodeau

Coordinator, Academic Support, Program Evaluation, and Research, Carleton University
Rachelle Thibodeau works as a staff member in Carleton University’s Centre for Initiatives in Education and as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology. Since 1998, she has developed and led peer-learning programs focused on access and success for underprepared and marginalized learners. She also teaches a fourth-year writing seminar for psychology students and researches the connection between social class, identity, and academic... Read More →

Additional Authors
EK

Eva Kartchava

Eva Kartchava is Assistant Professor of Applied Linguistics and TESL at Carleton University. Her research interests include technology use in language learning and higher education, effective assessment strategies, teacher cognition, and the role of instruction in second language acquisition.
ST

Sarah Todd

Sarah Todd is an associate professor in the school of social work at Carleton University. Her areas of study are social work education, youth and gender and sexuality. Her current research explores the impact of new managerialism on social work education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 54A

15:45

CON04.08 - Dodging the disciplinary divide: Blending people, concepts and learning
Traditionally, students learn concepts and principles in a disciplinary manner that can limit their ability to see and make important connections between disciplines. Integrative, rather than siloed, thinking is essential for exploring larger, societal problems that transcend disciplinary boundaries, and for understanding how different disciplines work together to solve these problems. Integrative thinking must be learned, practiced, and applied by students to change the way students approach societal issues (Spelt, Biemans, Tobi, Luning & Mulder, 2009). To help students develop this way of thinking, we need to design curricula differently. At York University, a dynamic, inter-departmental team is designing a first-year integrated science experience where students are introduced to the same traditional concepts, but in an integrated and team-based manner (Michaelson & Sweet, 2008). While the process has been informed by a backwards design approach, additional elements have been required to reflect the integrative approach to teaching and learning (McTighe & Wiggins, 2012). These elements include developing overarching learning outcomes that are not specific to any one discipline, making connections between disciplinary concepts, identifying central themes that encompass all relevant disciplines, finding appropriate classroom space, and deciding on supportive pedagogical approaches. These instructional approaches include a flipped and blended classroom approach to minimize in-class didactic teaching and make space for higher-order activities; simultaneous team teaching to model how disciplinarians interact and approach a particular topic or issue; and team-based learning in an active learning classroom to develop students’ collaborative skills and promote their active exploration of material (Faculty Focus, 2014). In this workshop session, participants will work with the facilitators and each other to achieve the following outcomes: develop interdisciplinary learning outcomes, identify strategies for making disciplinary connections, and consider how to implement a team-based approach for supporting integrated curricula using small- and large-group discussions, and guided handouts.


References:


1. Spelt, E.J.H., Biemans, H.J.A., Tobi, H., Luning, P.A., & Mulder, M. (2009). Teaching and learning in interdisciplinary higher education: A systematic review. Educ Psychol Rev, 21, 365-378.


2. Michaelson, L.K. & Sweet, M. (2008). The essential elements of team-based learning. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 116, 7-27.


3. McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2012). Understanding by Design® framework. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/siteASCD/publications/UbD_WhitePaper0312.pdf.


4. Faculty Focus. (2014). Blended and flipped: Exploring new models for effective teaching & learning. Madison, WI: Magna Publications.

Presenters
avatar for Tamara Kelly

Tamara Kelly

Associate Lecturer, Biology, York University
Tamara Kelly is an Associate Lecturer in the Department of Biology at York University. She teaches at a variety of levels (1st, 2nd, and 4th year), conducts teaching and learning research in biology, and is part of the first-year Integrated Science team.
LW

Lauren Wallar

Lauren Wallar is a PhD candidate in Population Medicine at the University of Guelph and an Educational Development Specialist in the Faculty of Science at York University. | Lauren is a co-recipients of the 2015-16 Career and Teaching Development Fellowship at the University of Guelph.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
UCC 61

15:45

CON04.14 - Let’s be Direct about Information Literacy Assessment: Using Quick Writes to Capture Direct Evidence of Student Learning
As direct assessment methods gain increasing attention in higher education, this presentation will introduce quick writes as an engaging authentic assessment technique for capturing evidence of learning and measuring information literacy student learning outcomes Quick writes are commonly used in middle school and high school classes. Students are given a short passage and assigned to quickly write a response about the passage. The presenter has adapted the quick write technique and applied it to information literacy assessment. In this context, the prompt is based on a real-world scenario, course topic or assignment. The librarian introduces the quick write as a research activity to reinforce concepts and skills presented during the session. Students work independently and complete the task in 15 minutes. Quick writes embrace problem-based learning and inquiry-based learning pedagogies. They can be designed to encourage the application of higher order thinking skills such as situational competence, essential for problem-solving in real-world situations. The presentation will accentuate how direct assessment techniques such as quick writes empower students to demonstrate knowledge, critical thinking, and problem-solving abilities, especially as these relate to information literacy. The presenter will highlight how California Lutheran University implemented the quick write in its information literacy instruction plan and will share practical ways to design quick writes and scoring rubrics around lesson plans and learning outcomes. Examples will emphasize the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Participants will work in small groups and create a quick write and scoring rubric. Participants will be encouraged to share their quick writes and rubrics and briefly discuss how these can be used in courses or information literacy sessions. After completion of this workshop, attendees will be able to describe the steps involved in planning, designing, and incorporating a quick write and rubric in a 50-minute information literacy session.

Presenters
avatar for Henri Mondschein

Henri Mondschein

Librarian, California Lutheran University
Henri Mondschein, MLS, Ed.D. is Manager of Information Literacy at the Pearson Library, California Lutheran University where he leads information literacy instruction and assessment. He has made presentations and led workshops in the United States and Canada on information literacy assessment; librarian-faculty collaboration; problem-based learning; and digital learning objects.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 15:45 - 16:35
Weldon Library 258

16:45

POSTER.01 - The Impact of Community Engaged Education on Undergraduate Student Development
Community engagement is an educational experience through which students learn course concepts by interacting with a specific community to produce public benefit. It is a pedagogical method that offers a wide range of positive impacts on student development (Furco, Jones-White, Huesman & Gorny, 2012). While community engaged learning methods have been practiced in the United States for several decades, this approach has recently become more widespread in Canadian universities (Chambers, 2009).


This study investigated the impacts of community engagement on undergraduate students in a high enrollment (190 students) second-level neuroscience course at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) during the winter semester of 2016. A pre-survey was administered in January and a post-survey was administered in March following students’ community engagement experiences. The survey used a 5-point Likert agreement scale to assess student experience. It was hypothesized that community engagement would promote student development across four themes: academic development, civic responsibility, professional skill development, and personal skill development. Based on previous research, the largest impact was expected to occur in professional and personal skill development (Astin & Sax, 1998; Furco et al., 2012). Descriptive statistics indicated that the greatest changes in student perceptions occurred in the theme of academic development, specifically in understanding of course content, academic value, and student-faculty interactions. There were no changes in student perceptions observed for questions on future community engagement plans and value of reflection. Student perceptions in both pre- and post-surveys remained positive for 21 of 26 survey questions, suggesting that community engagement benefits student development in areas that they originally predicted. Findings from this study could be used to guide further areas of research and to assist with course design for other instructors. Future directions may include using focus groups to capture a greater understanding of the impacts of community engagement on student development.

Presenters
DW

Deanne Wah

Deanne Wah is a fourth year Honours Biology student pursuing a Minor in Psychology at McMaster University. Her thesis project explores the impacts of community engaged learning on undergraduate student development. Additionally, Deanne is interested in neuroendocrinology. She hopes to combine both of her interests to become a future educator.
UZ

Urszula Zoladeski

McMaster University
Urszula Zoladeski is an Honours Biology student at McMaster University. The focus of her academic career is animal and human behaviour, specifically human learning and cognition. Participating in McMaster’s MacEngaged program as a second year student sparked her interest in service learning and her dedication to promoting community engagement initiatives.

Additional Authors
AK

Ayesha Khan

Dr. Ayesha Khan is an Assistant Professor at McMaster with the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behavior. Her research interests explore enhancement of undergraduate student experience through experiential education and ways through which social loafing can be decreased in group work.
CT

Cristina Tortora

Cristina Tortora is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Mathematics & Statistics at McMaster University.
MM

Mirella Mazza

Mirella Mazza is an Honours Biology graduate of McMaster University. She is currently a Nursing student at the University of Toronto.
PM

Paul McNicholas

Paul McNicholas is the Canada Research Chair in Computational Statistics and a Professor in the Department of Mathematics & Statistics at McMaster University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.02 - Community Nursing Students Food Asset Mapping Project
Teaching student nurses how to navigate the system to facilitate people’s access to resources for health is challenging for nurse educators. Access to food is one of the basic human needs and is important as a social determinant of health (Buck-McFadyen, 2015; Johnson, Williams, & Gillis, 2015; Roncarolo, Adam, Bisset, & Potvin, 2015). As part of their Community and Family Health Nursing placement, undergraduate nursing students worked with a graduate student from the Human Environments Analysis Laboratory and a neighbourhood family centre in a food asset mapping project to explore where food was available to residents of an urban neighbourhood. Nursing students also interviewed residents to learn about their experience in accessing food for themselves and their families. The information on food sources was mapped to indicate the location and cost of food available in the neighbourhood. Critical analysis of the residents’ food stories identified barriers to food security as well as strategies individuals used to access food for themselves and their families. The food asset map and residents’ food stories were shared with the community residents and service providers. This project increased students’ knowledge of community resources and increased student sensitivity to the issue of food insecurity. It promoted community capacity building by mapping food assets and developing a sustainable tool for families and service providers to assist in navigating the system when accessing food sources. A poster of this innovative teaching project will increase general awareness of the issue of food insecurity and the contribution of students’ work in community practice as well as provide opportunities for community members and academics to discuss and explore possible next steps for this project.

Presenters
PB

Pat Bethune-Davies

Pat Bethune-Davies is a Registered Nurse with a clinical background in community health and a broad range of experience in nursing education. She is the course lead in the Health Promotion and Caring for Families and Communities in the BScN Program at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario.
AL

Anne Lamesse

Anne Lamesse is a Registered Nurse with a clinical background in outpost nursing and a broad range of experience in nursing education. She is the Year 2 Coordinator of the BScN Program at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.03 - Living with Spinal Cord Injury: Teaching innovations in a first-year seminar course
Influenced by research from other institutions, the University of Guelph has implemented first-year seminar (FYS) courses to help new students undergo a successful transition into a university learning environment (Andrade, 2009; Ross and Boyle, 2007). These courses allow students to interact with faculty, graduate students, and their peers in small, engaging, research-intensive, and learner-centred groups that focus on creative and unique topics. During the winter semester of 2015, we designed a FYS course that explored the physical, social, emotional, psychological, and economical phenomena that may be experienced by an individual living with a spinal cord injury (SCI). The course was designed to provide an interdisciplinary and interactive learning experience through group-based activities, experiential learning, laboratory sessions, and guest lectures. The primary goal of the course was to develop transferable skills such as research, communication, and problem solving, while cultivating a love of learning. The students studied the anatomy of the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system with respect to cervical SCIs, and also learned from the perspectives of guest-lecturers with SCIs in order to foster their awareness of issues and common experiences within the SCI community. Assignments were aligned with course outcomes to facilitate the construction of knowledge within these areas (Biggs, 1996). Together, the assignments and teaching practices helped to shape the students into advocates for SCI and accessibility through community engagement.

This poster aims to provide a forum for discussion with the instructors and past students of the FYS course to share teaching experiences, and ideas for innovation in other early post-secondary courses. Thus, by visiting this poster presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • Discuss the challenges and opportunities of teaching first-year students with different backgrounds and interests
  • Identify potential successes and failures of course design from the perspectives of both the instructors and the students


Presenters
avatar for William Albabish

William Albabish

William Albabish is a PhD candidate in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph. His research focuses on the creation of dissection-based audio-visual material to enhance the learning experience of students.
SM

Sean McWatt

Ph.D, Student, University of Guelph
Sean McWatt is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Human Health & Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph. His research focuses on human anatomy dissection, photography, and the creation, implementation, and evaluation of digital education modules in undergraduate human anatomy. |

Additional Authors
BJ

Brooklyn Joyce

Brooklyn Joyce is a second-year undergraduate student studying Human Kinetics at the University of Guelph. She is interested in pursuing a career in the field of injury prevention and biomechanics, specifically, the study of spinal cord injury. Brooklyn volunteers with SpinFit, an exercise program for people with spinal cord injuries.
CC

Christian Cheung

Christian Cheung is a second-year undergraduate student studying Human Kinetics at the University of Guelph. His interests lie in the study of biomechanics and human anatomy. His current goals are to continue to build on his previous research experience and supplement his undergraduate learning with extracurricular involvement.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.04 - Engaging Communities and Empowering Learners: An Assessment of Internship Programs in Critical Liberal Arts Curriculum
Experiential learning opportunities through internship programs are increasingly part of university student experiences. This poster presents a faculty, community and student assessment of a newly developed internship program in criminology and addictions at the University of Saskatchewan. Addressing the conference themes of ‘learner motivation’ and ‘community and global engagement’, we discuss student, community and faculty perceptions of program successes as an educational and career readiness tool, with concerns relative to its placement in wider liberal arts education.


Current research about criminal justice internships have stressed the benefits related to academic development, buttressing classroom learning, personal growth, career readiness, professional skills, and networking (Murphy, Merrittt and Gibbons, 2013; Hiller, Salvatore and Taniguchi, 2014); showing positive appraisals from students and community supervisors (George, Lim, Lucas and Meadows, 2015). Studies of curriculum have also demonstrated students’ positive assessment of coursework in criminology and criminal justice to prepare them for real world internships (Ross and Elechi, 2006). Less addressed are student, community and faculty perceptions of the importance of these internships within a liberal arts curriculum.


Preliminary findings put forward pedagogical and career related benefits of internships and verify student perceptions that undergraduate coursework prepares them for fieldwork. We identify differences, however, across universities in academic coursework and perceptions of the fit between liberal arts education and internship learning. On the one hand internships are viewed as preparing students more for specific jobs (e.g. correctional workers) and are of less value to teaching competencies for the liberal arts (e.g. critical thinking and effective citizenship). On the other hand, internships are said to support students to become critical, creative and reflective about the society that they live. Following recommendations about best practice, we put forward a pedagogical approach that allows students to situate their internships in critical dialogues supported through writing assignments and classroom-based learning.

Presenters
CB

Carolyn Brooks

Carolyn Brooks is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research and publications focus on youth resilience, the politics of punishment, violence, and visual and community based participatory research methods.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.05 - Experiential learning: A case study of co-operative experience of undergraduate pharmacy students
This research study explores the co-operative experience of undergraduate pharmacy students with a focus on its influence on the students’ professional and personal development. Kolb’s (1984) four-stage experiential learning cycle – (1) experience, (2) reflection on experience, (3) theory and abstract concepts, and (4) practice and testing of concepts – is the theoretical framework for my study. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and focus groups with 19 pharmacy students from the first graduating class in this program, 12 co-op employers, and 12 faculty members. The impact of experiential learning on the professional and personal development of undergraduate pharmacy students during their co-op experiences was multi-dimensional. While students believed that they gained self-confidence and achieved self-discovery and career-related discovery after their co-op placements, their professional and personal development could be driven by their own motivation and personality. Co-op employers and co-op sites played a role in influencing students’ individual development. Despite the unstructured and inconsistent nature of co-op, it was evident that co-op offered students the opportunity to explore the diversity of the pharmacy profession. The findings suggested that students should take ownership of their learning; and faculty should supplement students’ learning by using teaching moments at school to reinforce and re-align the knowledge and skills acquired in class and those gained during real-world practice. Based on my research, I was able to propose a model of co-op experience integrated in the four stages of Kolb’s experiential learning cycle. A hybrid of both structured and unstructured experiential learning for pharmacy students might be an ideal curricular model.

Presenters
CH

Certina Ho

Certina Ho is a Lecturer at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto. In her current position, Certina is a course coordinator of a third-year elective on patient/medication safety and is a faculty coordinator for the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) rotations at the Office of Experiential Education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.21 - Trent University's OPEN CHAIR project: Fostering a Culture of Mutual Learning
The Open Chair Project is an innovative initiative that provides the Trent University teaching community the opportunity to learn, share and celebrate teaching at Trent. Trent has a long history of remarkable teaching expertise that is typically reserved only for the students in courses. The Open Chair project opens the learning environment to welcome others to take a chair, as a guest, in a lecture, seminar, or tutorial, to witness teaching practices first hand. Classic and innovative pedagogy paves the way for rich discussions, deep learning, and reflection. The Open Chair project is open to faculty, instructors, and graduate students who want to see teaching in action! There is a rich body of research that examines different approaches to faculty development and mentoring, including the use of faculty learning circles and faculty learning communities (McLeod & Steinert 2010; Silver & Leslie 2009; Waes et. al. 2015). Many of the previously developed educational opportunities focus on retroactive discussion of their experiences in the classroom. However our project is expanding upon the idea of mutual learning in action. We are bringing an asynchronous and synchronous learning environment for reflection and deep learning. We have developed a collaborative model whereby we can think about our pedagogy, see it in action, and reflect on how we can incorporate or decide not to incorporate it into our own teaching practice. This provides a unique experiential learning opportunity for all participants. This conference poster will provide an opportunity for conference participants to learn about this innovative project that has dismantled barriers within our teaching practices discussions and has allowed for deep reflection on our teaching culture at Trent University.

Presenters
AG

Adam Guzkowski

Adam Guzkowski is the Teaching Awards Coordinator at the Centre for Teaching and Learning at Trent University, where his work focuses on multiple approaches to fostering and celebrating excellence in teaching and learning. He has taught in various capacities at Seneca College, Trent University, Western University, and Fleming College. Prior to his work at the post-secondary level, Adam taught and managed experiential education programs at a... Read More →
RH

Robyne Hanley-Dafoe

Robyne Hanley-Dafoe is an award winning Psychology Instructor who uses narrative pedagogy to engage and inspire her students to achieve their personal best. Robyne’s research interests focuses on health and wellness for learning including topics such as resiliency, optimal challenge, and self-identity. She has taught for nearly a decade at the post-secondary level while continuing to work with university students and elementary and secondary... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.22 - Development in Teaching Practice as a Sociocultural Learning Process
This poster seeks to promote reflection and dialogue about development in teaching practice as a complex, socio-cultural learning process. A sociocultural perspective views learning as holistic and situated in the context of activity or practice (Fenwick, 2001) – in this case, teaching practice.


The poster is based on a doctoral research study that adopted a sociocultural lens and a phenomenological research approach (Giorgi, 2009) to better understand how mid-career faculty experience development in teaching practice. The goals of the poster are to share both the theoretical lens that informed the study and the multi-phased, socio-cultural model of teacher professional learning that emerged from the study.


Billett’s (2002) theory of co-participation, which will be visually depicted, was the primary sociocultural learning lens that informed the study. This theory views workplace learning as resulting from an interaction between the workplace context and individual engagement.


Boelryk’s (2014) multi-phased, sociocultural model of teacher professional learning extends Billett’s theory in several ways. First, it examines the individual and contextual interactions as they apply to teacher professional learning. Second, it explicitly characterizes unique individual, social, and contextual elements for four phases of the learning process– a catalyst phase, an idea development phase, an implementation phase, and an outcomes phase. The poster will depict the distinct individual, social, and contextual elements for each phase as well as the interrelationships between the elements. This model has been formally recognized as making a unique contribution to the educational development literature.


This multi-phased, sociocultural model of mid-career teacher professional learning provides a useful tool for educational development. It can offer a holistic model for situating other research, it can offer insight into teacher learning processes, and it can inform the design and development of educational development practice. The poster is designed to engage viewers in these conversations.

Presenters
avatar for Annique Boelryk

Annique Boelryk

Faculty Developer / Instructional Designer, Georgian College
Annique Boelryk is an instructional designer and educational developer at Georgian College, Ontario where she has worked since 2000. While working as an educational developer, she completed her PhD in Educational Technology and Learning Design through Simon Fraser University in 2014, focusing on post-secondary teacher continuous professional learning.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.23 - Faculty Responses to the Teaching Practices Survey Based on Time Spent Lecturing
In October of 2014, our institution surveyed faculty about their teaching practices, attitudes towards specific practices and perceptions of institutional support for teaching. All 11 Faculties participated, resulting in a total of 1177 responses (overall 23.5% response rate). Last year, at the STLHE 2015 conference, we shared the survey tool and discussed its evolution from an instrument developed in 2008 as part of a campus-wide initiative to modifications by various institutions in the Bay View Alliance as well as the Association of American Universities.

Over the past decade, there has been considerable interest in understanding the instructional practices most predominantly used in higher education, as well as their relative impact on student learning (Ambrose et al., 2010; Bain, 2004; Buskist & Groccia, 2012; Nilson, 2010). A number of studies have explored why faculty chose lecture as the primary mode of instruction (Henderson, Beach, & Finkelstein, 2011), and it has been asserted that it is unlikely a single factor determines what instructional practice a faculty member choses to implement (Lammers & Murphy, 2002).

The purpose of this presentation is to bring awareness to faculty practices and explore if/how faculty teaching practices change with respect to time spent on lecturing. We compared response patterns of faculty who reported spending less than 25% of classroom time lecturing with faculty who reported spending more than 75%. Using this breakdown, we analysed the survey data on practices and perceptions related to in-class and out-of-class expectations, use of TA time, perceptions of institutional recognition of the value of teaching, and utilization of professional development opportunities. We will invite participants to reflect on their practices and perceptions in relation to our findings and work together to critically evaluate key data points. We will also share some literature around these issues with the participants during the poster presentation.

Presenters
avatar for Gülnur Birol

Gülnur Birol

Director, University of British Columbia
Gülnur Birol, Director, Science Centre For Learning and Teaching, Faculty of Science, University of British Columbia, birol@science.ubc.ca. Gülnur holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering. Gülnur directs and oversees the centre’s activities across the Faculty of Science. Her recent collaborations include development of an award winning Seminar in Science Course, implementation of faculty practices survey and managing and evaluating large scale... Read More →

Additional Authors
AB

Adriana Briseno-Garzon

University of British Columbia
AH

Andrea Han

University of British Columbia


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.06 - Generating Website Online Content: An innovative educational project for professional MSc students
The purpose of this study was to evaluate students’ and instructors’ perspectives of completing a website design project for a required course in a professional master’s program. Fourteen students participated in a survey about their experience with web design, their perceptions of technology and of their learning styles. Strong correlations were found in; students’ absorption in learning and their creativity, students’ motivation to complete the project and ability to use of technology, the pedagogy underlying the website design project and students’ ability to use technology, and between the project pedagogy and motivation. From the instructors’ perspectives, one unforeseen issue was the extensive information that was presented on the individual websites, thus grading the was much more time intensive than would be required for a more traditional assignment. The positive aspect of this extensive amount of information was that topics were covered in greater detail than was possible during in-class lecture.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Ravenek

Michael Ravenek

Assistant Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, Western University
Dr. Michael Ravenek is an Assistant Professor in the School of Occupational Therapy at Western University. He teaches at both the undergraduate and graduate level, and has received numerous faculty and school-level teaching awards and recognitions. His research in teaching centres on the use of novel and accessible e-learning technologies.
SS

Sandi Spaulding

Dr. Sandi Spaulding is a professor in Occupational Therapy at Western University. She teaches in clinical human movement sciences using active learning techniques and a consolidation online course. She has received teaching awards at the faculty level.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.07 - Advancing online education: from text driven pedagogy to interactive learning
An interprofessional team of Health Sciences faculty at a Canadian University, as well as experts in instructional design and evaluation, has updated an open access, online interprofessional education program: ‘Preceptor Education Program for Health Professionals and Students’ (PEP). This program, originally launched in 2007, is designed to prepare both students and preceptors for on-site professional practice experiences and hasbeen accessed by more than 20,000 users.


The funding received from the Council of Ontario Universities (COU) Online Initiative through the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities in 2015 created the opportunity to update existing modules and develop a new one. These 9 modules are interactive with downloadable resources, learning exercises, animated video case scenarios and references. Contemporary technological updates have been made to content and learning activities based on constructivist, experiential and reflective learning theory (Kolb, 1984; Schön, 1987) as well as theories of e-learning (Butcher et al., 2014; Underhill, 2006).


Prior to the January 2016 launch of edition two of the PEP program the modules underwent pilot testing with 73 students and preceptors. The design team used feedback from the pilot test to refine the technological and pedagogical approaches used to foster learning and self-evaluation within the modules.


Learning outcomes of the poster include increased knowledge about: a) insights from the team’s redesign experience related to: online pedagogy, technological considerations, the online educational design process, interprofessional team work, working with an external production team and, in-house support; and b) how the 8 standards from the Quality Matters rubric - Learning Objectives (Competencies); Assessment and Measurement; Instructional Materials; Course Activities and Learner Interaction Course Technology; Learner Support; Accessibility and Usability - guided revisions and innovations to modules. Pilot test results for all modules will be presented.


Butcher, N., Wilson-Strydom, M., Uvalic-Trumbic. S., Daniel, J. (2014). A Guide to Quality in Online Learning. Academic Partnerships. Ontario Online Learning Portal for Faculty and Instructors, Contact North (http://teachonline.ca/tools-trends/quality-guidelines-and-practice/faculty-member-what-do-i-need-know-about-quality-online-learning Accessed online Oct 25, 2014).


Kolb, D. (1984). Experiential Learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.


Schön, D. (1983). The reflective practitioner. How professional think in action. New York: Basic Books.


Underhill, A.F. (2006). Theories of learning and their implications for online assessment. Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education, 7(1), 165-174.

Presenters
KF

Karen Ferguson

Karen Ferguson is a Registered Nurse and Lecturer in the Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing at Western University with research interests in simulated teaching environments, preceptored learning and professional development.
avatar for Taslim Moosa

Taslim Moosa

Clinical Educator/Lecturer- Speech-Language Pathologist, Western University
Taslim Moosa, Clinical Educator/Lecturer, Speech-Language Pathologist | Taslim Moosa is a Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) with 20 years of clinical experience. She currently works as a clinical educator/lecturer at Western University. Since 2008, she has provided her students with opportunities to participate in social justice projects through the delivery of SLP services in First Nations Communities, Peru, and South Africa.
avatar for Julie Whitehead

Julie Whitehead

Instructional Designer, Western U
Julie Whitehead is an Instructional Designer with a MEd.in Educational Technology, working in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Western University. Julie's expertise is in researching, developing, and implementing new methodologies for combining multimedia/web technologies for communication and education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.08 - Partnering with Faculty via the Learning Management System
Traditionally, librarians collaborate with faculty to support first year undergraduates in their transition to university. This commonly takes the form of a standalone, in-person session on library resources and research. With growing class sizes and distance offerings of class sections, the library one-shot is not enough. By integrating library instruction modules into course sites in the Learning Management System (LMS), Sakai, we are able to reach a larger audience, at their own pace, in their online course environment. Research has revealed that online instruction increases students’ awareness of the library’s role in their research (Hess, 2014, p.143). By reaching students in the LMS, we are growing the influence the library can have on students’ research.


This poster will detail an alternative to in person class instruction: an approach that is student-centered, incorporates both assessment and librarian/faculty collaboration, and is recognized as an effective method for increasing first year students’ information literacy skills (Price, Becker, Clark and Collins, 2011, p. 705). Screen captures of the LMS-embedded library module will illustrate how we are supporting students’ abilities to find research resources, use them effectively and ethically, and navigate the library both in person and online. Empowering students with these abilities contributes to graduating students with lifelong learning skills.


Assessment methods utilized via pretest/posttest components will be presented along with strategies to encourage student participation. Longitudinal results over 3 phases of iterative development, deployment, and evaluation will demonstrate the impact of design choices in the module and assessments. Results will illustrate an innovative method for partnering with professors to support this student group. See how we are bringing the library to the place undergraduate students are working - their learning management system- and how the results are being used to continue to improve teaching of information literacy.


Learning Outcomes:


Participants will learn a method for librarian/faculty collaboration within a learning management system.


Participants will learn a method for teaching students within the learning management system how to conduct research.


Participants will learn a method for encouraging students to access/use library resources and services.


References:


Hess, A. N. (2014). Online and Face-to-Face Library Instruction: Assessing the Impact on Upper-Level Sociology Undergraduates. Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian, 33(3), 132–147. doi:10.1080/01639269.2014.934122


Lyons, J. P., Hannon, J., & Macken, C. (2014). Curriculum Models for the 21st Century, 423–442. doi:10.1007/978-1-4614-7366-4


Pickens-French, K., & McDonald, K. (2013). Changing Trenches, Changing Tactics: A Library’s Frontline Redesign in a New CMS. Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning, 7(1-2), 53–72. doi:10.1080/1533290X.2012.705613


Price, R., Becker, K., Clark, L., & Collins, S. (2011). Embedding information literacy in a first-year business undergraduate course. Studies in Higher Education, 36(6), 705–718. doi:10.1080/03075071003725350

Presenters
CM

Crystal Mills

Library Assistant, Western University
Crystal Mills (BA, MLIS) is a library assistant at the University of Western Ontario. She is the Resource Support Coordinator and Student Assistant Supervisor at The D.B. Weldon Library. Her interests include design, user experience, and library services.
MS

Marg Sloan

Librarian, Western Libraries
Marg Sloan is an Assistant Librarian at the University of Western Ontario. She graduated with a MLIS degree in 1994 from The University of Western Ontario. She works at The D.B. Weldon Library at Western as a Research and Instruction Librarian for Film Studies, Sociology and Women’s Studies & Feminist Research. Her research interests focus on methods for best supporting undergraduate and graduatestudents with their research.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.09 - Design Considerations for Blended Learning
Post-secondary institutions are increasingly incorporating blended learning into the curriculum, yet there are many possible configurations for blended (or hybrid) courses. This project compared two hybrid courses that were offered in the General Education curriculum at a community college. One course employed a front-loaded design, whereby students completed online lessons and assessments prior to attending classes. The other utilized a bookend blend, with online components before and after the face-to-face session.


Student activity was tracked and compared across both classes to determine whether one model resulted in more engagement with the online course materials. Video viewing data and online activity logs from the Learning Management System (LMS) were used as proxies for engagement. Results suggest that the configuration of the course had a definite impact on student engagement.

Presenters
avatar for Matt Farrell

Matt Farrell

Professor and Faculty Development Consultant, Fanshawe College
Matt Farrell is a faculty member at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.10 - Assessing the Impact of E-learning Technologies in a Large, Undergraduate Statistics Course
Advancements in E-learning technologies enable learning to be individualized, which helps foster and empower all students, and improve their overall learning experience (Ruiz, Mintzer, Leipzig & Rosanne, 2006). Innovations in E-learning technology, such as Mindtap, have proved beneficial in expanding learning, especially within large classes. Mindtap and similar E-learning technologies provide automatically graded assignments, making it possible for teachers to administer weekly homework in large classes where grading traditional assignments would not be feasible. Mindtap offers a host of learning tools and an array of gradable assignments in an online platform.


The current study looks at the impact of Mindtap as a supplementary tool to a textbook within a large undergraduate statistic course. In this course, Mindtap assignments served as weekly formative assessments, where numerous attempts were allowed. Learning analytics, which included measures of engagement, time spent logged in, number of logins, and student performance, were also collected. We observed a strong relationship (r = 0.55) between students’ grades on their weekly Mindtap assignments and their midterm grades. Furthermore, results showed that students who engaged more with Mindtap (measured as time spent logged on) obtained higher grades on their exams. Additionally, 90% of students reported positive attitudes towards Mindtap, agreeing that it helped them learn the material. These results are consistent with a previous study in which 70% of the students in an undergraduate class reported that they were satisfied overall with the E-learning aspect of the course (Concannon, Flynn, & Campbell, 2005). Furthermore, Mindtap provided crucial information concerning student’s overall understanding of weekly material and allowed the instructor to allocate class-time accordingly.


In conclusion, the use of Mindtap as a supplementary E-learning tool to teach a large statistics class created an avenue for the instructor to assign frequent formative assessments, enhance student learning, and inform instruction.


References


Concannon, F., Flynn, A., & Campbell, M. (2005). What campus‐based students think about the quality and benefits of e‐learning. British journal of educational technology, 36(3), 501-512.


Ruiz, J. G., Mintzer, M. J., & Leipzig, R. M. (2006). The impact of e-learning in medical education. Academic medicine, 81(3), 207-212.

Presenters
MF

Melissa Ferland

Melissa Ferland- Graduate Student in Clinical Developmental Psychology, York University
CM

Claudia Molinaro

Claudia Molinaro- Undergraduate Student, Honours Psychology BSc, York University

Additional Authors
JF

Jessica Flake

Jessica is a postdoctoral fellow in the Psychology department at York University. Her main area of research is in quantitative methods but is keen to study student motivation and motivation assessment tools in gatekeeper courses.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.11 - Blending the Law: Legal Research in a (Partially) Flipped Classroom
In the summer of 2015, the University of Alberta Libraries began to create short, semi-interactive online tutorials covering the basics of legal research. These learning objects were assigned as a part of the Legal Research & Writing course within a blended-learning model of information literacy instruction. It was initially delivered to approximately 180 first-year Law students in two sections, and complemented by a series of in-person sessions with librarians. However, the tutorials were also designed to be openly available to the wider community.

Our initial motivation for adopting a blended model was a combination of course restructuring, staffing limits, and an institutional focus on online tutorials. This model allows librarians to optimize the time we have in front of students, by condensing the procedural and information-dense content into short, succinct tracks. It allows in-person sessions to be more hands-on, increasing active and skill-based learning. It also gives students another resource they can revisit online, in their own time throughout and after the course.

This poster will introduce our objectives, processes, workflow, and rational for adopting the blended model. It will also address some of the content-related, technical, and workflow challenges we faced. Finally, it provides some early assessment and addresses our ongoing plans to maintain, improve, and make the tutorials more accessible to a wider audience. Going forward, we would like to increase interactivity by including more interactive activities, and improve technical quality.

Presenters
avatar for Emily Zheng

Emily Zheng

Public Services Librarian, University of Alberta
Emily Zheng is also a Public Service Librarian at the University of Alberta. She serves as liaison to English Literature and Political Science, with public service responsibilities in Law.

Additional Authors
MJ

Meris James

Meris James is a Public Service Librarian at the University of Alberta, responsible for Law and Government Information. She works at the J.A. Weir Memorial Law Library and the Rutherford Humanities and Social Sciences Library.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.12 - The flipped classroom can empower learners beyond improving grades
The flipped classroom is an educational approach that is gaining significant in a variety of disciplines. In the flipped classroom, class time is repurposed: basic acquisition of knowledge is done on students' own time while class is devoted to knowledge application and synthesis. Despite the potential of this approach, the majority of research into the flipped classroom has focused simply focused on preferences for the approach as well as modest gains in examination scores. This presentation will discuss the results of a mixed-methods study that evaluated students' learning approaches in a newly-introduced flipped classroom course. Students reported using metacognitive strategies to evaluate their learning, spent less time multitasking, and used deep and active approaches in both their acquisition of basic knowledge as well as classroom activities. Session participants will have the opportunity to discuss assessment strategies and course design to facilitate active learning in the flipped classroom.

Presenters
SM

Sarah McLean

Dr. Sarah McLean is an Assistant Professor in the departments of Physiology & Pharmacology and Anatomy & Cell Biology at Western University. She currently holds a teaching fellowship with the Teaching Support Centre, where she is evaluating the introduction of blended laboratory environments in basic medical science courses.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.13 - Students’ Perspectives on the Benefits and Limitations of Peer Assessments in Collaborative Learning: Further Evaluation of the Pod Model
Educational research and practice indicates that students learn best when they are actively engaged with the course material and with one another in student-driven, collaborative, small-group learning activities (Summerlee & Murray, 2010). Designed to deliver the learning benefits of small-group teaching in larger classes, the Pod model is a blended-format peer-driven learning model, where students collaborate on a series of enquiry-based exercises both face-to-face and within virtual Pods (online groups of 3-4 peers), providing peer assessments of one another’s work. By transforming students into teachers, responsible for their own learning, the Pod model explicitly aims to foster a sense of increased engagement, responsibility, and accomplishment among the students. These three psychological ingredients (belonging, autonomy, and competence) provide the necessary foundation for empowering intrinsically motivated learners (Ryan & Deci, 2000). The benefits and limitations of the Pod model have been previously evaluated in a mixed-methods survey of students from two second-year courses in English and Psychology (Keefer & Taylor, 2014). Students’ evaluations were predominantly positive, identifying benefits such as course engagement, mastery of the course material, critical/flexible thinking, study skills, and exposure to other students’ perspectives. One aspect that received mixed student evaluations was the peer assessment component, which was perceived as a benefit by some students but an impediment to learning by others. To further understand the conditions under which the learning benefits of peer assessment are maximized, we conducted a follow-up study soliciting mixed-methods feedback about students’ experiences with the Pods and the peer assessment process in a third-year English language course. This poster presents quantitative and qualitative results from this follow-up study, which will inform further improvements to the design, implementation, and outcomes of the Pod approach. The audience will have the opportunity to discuss the model, ask questions, and provide suggestions for further adaptation.

Presenters
KV

Kateryna V Keefer

Western University
Kateryna V. Keefer is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychology, Trent University.
RT

Robyn Taylor O'Brien

Robyn N. Taylor O'Brien is a Research Scientist at the Department of Psychology, Trent University.

Additional Authors
SK

Sarah Keefer

Sarah L. Keefer is a Professor and National 3M (2009) Teaching Fellow at the Department of English Literature, Trent University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.14 - Slow reading early modern texts and innovations in E-Learning: exploring the pedagogy of transcription
By engaging with this poster session, participants should be able to:
  • Describe how transcription methods increase access to digitized historical texts while maintaining the the richer context provided by the aesthetics of original documents.
  • Discuss pedagogical rationale for the slow reading approach in order to engage in meaningful distant reading through text analysis.
For use in a second year fully online undergraduate history course, our transdisciplinary team developed modules for early modern text transcription and analysis. The modules offer opportunities for slow reading, where students have a better opportunity to think about the foreign-ness of historical documents. The procedure encourages them to think about sources and where they come from, how scholars do research and what methodologies they employ (Historical Thinking, 2015). Combined with text mining software, such as Voyant Tools, students have an opportunity to use new digital methods in their research. This not only allows them to employ new historical methodologies, but also sets up new transferable skills in using OCR, text mining, and other digital tools whose basic principles can find uses far beyond the academy (DeLyser et al, 2013).


References:

DeLyser, D., & Potter, A. E. (2013). Teaching Qualitative Research: Experiential Learning in Group-Based Interviews and Coding Assignments. Journal Of Geography, 112(1), 18-28.

Historicalthinking.ca,. (2016). HISTORICAL THINKING CONCEPTS | Historical Thinking Project. Retrieved 6 January 2016, from http://historicalthinking.ca/historical-thinking-concepts

Milligan, I. (2013). Illusionary Order: Online Databases, Optical Character Recognition, and Canadian History, 1997-2010. Canadian Historical Review, 94(4), 540-569.

Presenters
avatar for Michael Brousseau

Michael Brousseau

Education Technology Developer, Brock University
Michael Brousseau is the Educational Technologies Developer in the Centre for Pedagogical Innovation at Brock University. He specializes in integration of external campus systems with the learning management system. Mike developed the prototype of the proposed Transcription Tool and will be an on-going member of its development. He is an advocate of open standards and has presented on LTI at the Open Apereo conference.

Additional Authors
GF

Giulia Forsythe

Giulia Forsythe is the Special Projects Facilitator at Brock University's Centre for Pedagogical Innovation, focusing in open pedagogy course design and universal design for learning.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.15 - Developing digital literacy: collaboration with faculty, librarians and educational developers
Developing students who can learn and flourish in a digital society is seen as a key responsibility for today’s universities and colleges (JISC, 2014). However, the lack of digital knowledge of some faculty members has been identified as one of the major barriers for developing online learning content in Canada that can help prepare students to be digitally literate (Contact North, 2012). Both academic librarians and educational developers exist as valuable partners for faculty and bring unique skillsets to the table when working with instructors to develop online content that will improve and strengthen students’ digital and information literacy skills. Nevertheless, many faculty members are unaware of how these professionals can work with them to develop online materials. York University Libraries’ Teaching and Learning Committee, which consists of librarian members and 1 educational developer from York’s Teaching Commons, developed a 1-day professional development workshop for university staff that provided attendees with the following:
  • An overview of the theory and history of instructional design, and best practices.
  • A candid conversation about some challenges faculty members face when creating online courses and how librarians and educational developers can help overcome these challenges.
  • The opportunity for attendees to plan their own eLearning project using an abbreviated version of the model developed by Horton (2012).
The 1-day workshop presentation slides, worksheets, and other materials will be highlighted by the poster presenters. The overall professional development workshop plan will be provided to attendees so they can modify or recreate this workshop at their own institution. Overall, this poster will showcase one of the many ways that York University staff are creating a culture that embraces eLearning and establishes key partnerships amongst faculty, librarians, and educational developers to ensure that faculty have access to the necessary supports to develop pedagogically-sound online learning materials that improve students’ digital literacies.


References

Contact North (2012). Online learning in Canada: At a tipping point. A cross-country check-up 2012. Retrieved from http://teachonline.ca/sites/default/files/pdf/innovation-practices/onlinelearningincanadareport_june_12_2012.pdf

Horton, W. (2012). E-learning by design. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

JISC (2014). Developing digital literacies. Retrieved from https://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/developing-digital-literacies

Presenters
BK

Barbara Kerr

Barbara Kerr is an Educational Developer with the Teaching Commons, and a member of the York University Library Teaching and Learning Committee
avatar for Stephanie Quail

Stephanie Quail

Business Librarian, Peter F. Bronfman Business Library, York University
Stephanie Quail is a Business Librarian, and a member of the York University Library Teaching and Learning Committee

Additional Authors
DC

Dana Craig

Dana Craig is a Reference Librarian at Scott Library, York University, and a member of the York University Library Teaching and Learning Committee.
LJ

Leigh Jackson

Leigh Jackson is an Assistant Librarian at Glendon College, and a member of the York University Library Teaching and Learning Committee


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.16 - Blended Teaching of a Capstone Course: Students Perceptions and Experiences
As society advances technologically, it seems that slowly, various digital components are being used within the education both informally (i.e. making lecture notes available online) and formally (i.e. having an online course). There is increasing empirical support for models consisting of a blend of these two systems where F2F delivery is integrated with digital components (see Bernard, et al., 2014; Bonk & Graham, 2006; Garrison & Vaughan, 2008). A blended, or hybrid, approach usually combines the best practices of the traditional F2F lecture with the newest and most effective digital educational tools available (Bele & Rugelj, 2007), resulting in the delivery of pedagogically effective courses that are responsive to the challenges faced by the 21st century teacher and learner. Hybrid or blended learning can be any educational model where online delivery ranges from 50 to 80%. A blended model increases flexibility in both pedagogy and technological delivery systems. The present study examined undergraduate students in a capstone course (n = 53, 48 female). The course was delivered using blended teaching, with half the classes taught face-to-face, and the other half being online. Students were asked to complete questionnaires, reflecting on their course experience. It was found that there was a significant correlation between students not feeling comfortable with technology having negative feelings towards blended learning (-.534**), while having strong time management skills and a desire to do well was associated with having an overall positive experience in the blended learning course (.410**). The results are discussed with a focus on what educators can do to ensure that students are having a positive experience with this type of delivery method.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.17 - Capturing Positive and Negative Perceptions of Blended Teaching of a Capstone Course
Blended teaching is an educational model where online delivery ranges from 50 to 80%. A blended model increases flexibility in both pedagogy and delivery (Kocoglu, Ozek & Kesli, 2011). In addition, it does seem to accommodate the various learning styles of students. For instance, in a recent study by Wichadee (2013), it was reported that students’ satisfaction was higher with a hybrid course, as it promoted thinking about material, while observing and listening to others, and allowed students to work at their own pace (Wichadee, 2013). The present study examined undergraduate students in a fourth year capstone course at a Canadian University (n = 53, 48 female). The course was taught using a blended model, with half of the classes being taught face-to-face, and the other half being online. Students were asked to give written responses describing both their positive and negative experiences. Students reported that they enjoyed having the extra time to learn at their own pace since they did not have to attend lecture every week. However, students also reported that the biggest challenge was staying on top of their weekly readings and assignments on their own. When asked about advice they would give to future prospective students, the participants stated that it is important to have good time management skills particularly when taking this type of course. These results highlight the key struggle with this type of teaching, that is the balance between giving students freedom, while still ensuring that they are set up to succeed and learn the necessary material on their own.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.18 - Active Learning Techniques in Environmental Remote Sensing Education
Empowerment is a natural consequence of taking control of your own circumstance. In this poster I share some techniques for empowering students to take charge of their own learning through the use of innovative teaching tools in an active learning classroom, and the use of a web-enabled platform for providing continuous remote access to lab software and spatial data. The discipline of remote sensing can be daunting as it is based in physics, mathematics, and digital image processing using highly specialized software. With the use of active learning approaches in class, we establish baseline concepts supported by smart projectors, digital pens, and various approaches to problem-solving. With the use of these, and other tools, the learning approach is placed more directly in the hands of the student, allowing them to pave their own path to understanding through guided self-exploration and discovery.

Presenters
AM

Amy Mui

Dr. Amy Mui is currently a lecturer at the University of Toronto in the Department of Geography and Programs in Environment, where she received her doctorate in environmental remote sensing. She is an enthusiastic instructor of geospatial and ecology-based courses and a strong supporter of educational technology in higher education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.19 - Enhancing Learning through Blended-Format Collaborative Exercises: An Empirical Evaluation of the Pod Model in an English Language Course
Can the benefits of student-driven small-group learning be attained in larger classes? The Pod model was explicitly designed to address this challenge, by shifting some of the collaborative student-to-student interaction online (S. Keefer & K. Keefer, 2014; Summerlee & Murray, 2010). In this blended-format approach, students collaborate on a series of enquiry-based exercises both face-to-face and within virtual Pods (online groups of 3-4 peers), providing peer assessments of one another’s work. To date, the Pod model has been implemented in several medium-sized undergraduate classes in humanities and sciences. Preliminary analyses of student evaluations identified a number of learning benefits of the Pod approach such as increased engagement, improved mastery of the course material, enhanced critical/flexible thinking and study skills, and exposure to other students’ perspectives (Keefer & Taylor, 2014; S. Keefer & K. Keefer, 2014). However, students also identified several areas for improvement. Following students’ feedback, the Pod model was revised and re-administered in a third-year English Language course.

This poster presents quantitative and qualitative results from student evaluations of this latest version of the Pods. The results are compared with the previous data in terms of areas of perceived impact, satisfaction, and areas for improvement. Notably, the data collected for the current study is based on a larger sample size than previously available, offering a greater diversity of students’ perspectives. The results of this study will inform further improvements to the design, implementation, and outcomes of the Pod approach.

The audience will have the opportunity to discuss the model, ask questions, and provide suggestions for further adaptation. The Pod model epitomizes the theme of this conference, as it explicitly aims to foster a sense of increased engagement, responsibility, and accomplishment among the students – the very psychological ingredients that empower intrinsically motivated learners (Ryan & Deci, 2000).



Presenters
KV

Kateryna V Keefer

Western University
Kateryna V. Keefer is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychology, Trent University.

Additional Authors
SK

Sarah Keefer

Sarah L. Keefer is a Professor and National 3M (2009) Teaching Fellow at the Department of English Literature, Trent University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.20 - Improving Student Learning Outcomes by Incorporating a 3D Neuroanatomy E-Learning Resource
Neuroanatomy is one of the most challenging topics in anatomy, with many novice students considering it to be the most difficult, primarily due to the difficulty of developing a clear understanding of highly-complex spatial relationships that exist between structures. Of growing concern is the need to develop resources capable of minimizing the effects of students’ intrinsic individual differences such as spatial ability. Previously, 3D resources have been shown to be beneficial to learning outcomes in other spatially demanding subject areas including geography, chemistry, and mathematics, however it has yet to be investigated in the area of neuroanatomy.

An interactive 3D e-learning resource was developed that enabled students to customize the pace and order of information, freely navigate between structures and choose their preferred viewpoint. Eighty-seven participants completed the cross-over study, which separated participants into two groups. Each group completed baseline anatomy knowledge and spatial ability assessments, followed by access to either the 3D e-learning or gross anatomy resources. Participants completed a post-module anatomy assessment prior to accessing the other learning modality. A final post-module knowledge assessment was administered following exposure to the second learning modality.

Students who initially accessed the 3D module scored significantly higher on the proceeding assessment than students who initially accessed the gross anatomy laboratory. Students who accessed 3D learning resources following gross anatomy resources, significantly improved on the final assessment. A negative correlation was observed between spatial ability and change in assessment score following access to the 3D module, demonstrating students with low spatial ability experienced a greater positive effect on learning outcomes than students with high spatial ability.

Results of this study will establish evidence-based guiding principles that will facilitate the design and deployment of effective 3D e-learning resources, particularly for spatially complex disciplines including the health sciences, geography, architecture, and visual arts.

Presenters
LA

Lauren Allen

Lauren Allen, MSc is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, at The University of Western Ontario. She is investigating the impact of 3D visualization technologies and learning resources in medical education.

Additional Authors
RE

Roy Eagleson

Roy Eagleson, Ph.D., P.Eng., is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Software Engineering, Faculty of Engineering at the Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. He is also an associate scientist at the Robarts Research Institute, and a scientist and principal investigator at the Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics (CSTAR) Research Centre, part of the London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC). As part of the Ontario... Read More →
SD

Sandrine DeRibaupierre

Sandrine de Ribaupierre, M.D., F.R.C.S.C., is an associate professor of neurosurgery at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at the Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. She is working as a pediatric neurosurgeon. Her main research areas are in the use of virtual reality applications in education, such as neuroanatomy teaching for medical students and residents, and surgical simulation. She is also involved in research studying... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.24 - Introducing Diverse Perspectives in Insurance Finance Education through Student-centered Learning Activities
Even after the recent financial crisis, current insurance finance education follows a strictly neoclassical model. Moreover, based on results from a survey I conducted in a large-classroom entry-level course, students enrolled in these programs are self-selected to be driven predominantly by financial considerations when choosing the program. In order to introduce pluralistic perspectives in insurance finance education, as well as to motivate and engage students in active learning, I developed and implemented a series of pedagogical experiments incorporating financial ethics, moral reasoning, critical thinking and communication skills into the limited curriculum space educators are given. The experiments were conducted in a large-classroom second-year financial mathematics and a small fourth-year course. They were a juxtaposition of student-centered, individual and team-based activities. Course materials were drawn from various disciplines and strive to provide a holistic understanding of the industry and its socio-economic impact. Preliminary findings highlight the urgency and efficacy of introducing elements of humanity education and critical thinking into the pedagogy. The poster also highlights the importance of academic activism in external professional organizations that have major influence on universities’ curriculum setting and student evaluation. Poster viewers will be presented with a list of lessons learned from the pedagogical experiments. The lessons learned may be of interest to a wide audience, and in particular teaching faculties from finance and business ethics, economics, and political economy. Poster viewers are invited to share their experiences of introducing pluralistic perspectives in teaching in a discipline traditionally with a narrow focus, as well as to brainstorm other pedagogical approaches.

Presenters
VJ

Vicki Jingjing Zhang

Vicki J. Zhang is an Assistant Professor (Teaching Stream) of Actuarial Science at University of Toronto's Department of Statistical Science. She is the author of Uncalculated Risks: The transformation of insurance, the erosion of regulation, and the economic and social consequences (Canadian Scholar Press, 2014).


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.25 - The Collaborative Case: From Class Assignment to Publication
Advanced undergraduate students often look forward to participating in the published discourse of their fields; even excellent students, however, often require considerable assistance with the process of learning to write what Susan Peck MacDonald (1994) calls “expert insider prose.” Collaborative authorship provides one approach to this process: professors can work with promising students on a research project of the student’s choosing with an eye towards eventual publication. This interactive workshop will explore how a business professor, her student, and an English professor collaborated to move a course assignment towards a conference presentation at an academic conference and eventual publication and will also elicit, through an interactive workshop, strategies from session participants for such collaboration in their own courses, programs, and disciplines.

Presenters
avatar for Colleen Sharen

Colleen Sharen

Associate Professor, Brescia University College
Colleen Sharen is an Associate Professor of Management & Organizational at Brescia University College.

Additional Authors
MB

Michelle Braecker

Michelle Braecker is a recent graduate of Brescia University College and Coordinator of Food and Nutrition Services at Parkwood Hospital.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.26 - Offline Games: Exploring Student Perceptions of Gamification
Most gamification techniques rely on technologies such as computers, handheld devices, online applications, etc. We focus on the use of games and gameplay in their most fundamental way without the use of technology. This paper presents findings from a recent exploratory study funded by the University of Waterloo Centre for Teaching Excellence’s Learning Innovation and Teaching Enhancement Grant. Researchers ran parallel studies in Computer Science and Urban Planning that assessed student perceptions of the effectiveness of game-based techniques by identifying two lectures with similar pedagogical outcomes and teaching one using traditional lecture methods and the other using game-based techniques. Student perceptions in both faculties were gauged using surveys and semi-structured interviews. Results show significant improvements in student perception of engagement, creativity, teamwork, relevance and enjoyment. These results follow the relevant literature that posits that games and game dynamics do not only incentivize learners to engage in the classroom, but also activate positive psychological arousal.

Presenters
avatar for Hadi Hosseini

Hadi Hosseini

University of Waterloo
Hadi Hosseini is a PhD Candidate in the Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo.

Additional Authors
MH

Maxwell Hartt

Maxwell Hartt is a PhD Candidate in the School of Planning at the University of Waterloo.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.27 - Reflecting on threshold concepts as a framework for building a community of learners in doctoral education
In this poster, we discuss how one cohort of students, pursuing a PhD degree in Education, worked through threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge by building a student-led community of learners. This developed into a community of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991), a group of “people who share a concern or passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly” (Wenger, 2009, p. 1). As members of this community of practice, participants were able to navigate threshold concepts arising in their PhD program. Threshold concepts, understood as “critical moments of irreversible conceptual transformation in the educational experiences of learners” (Meyer & Land, 2005, p. 373), act as “conceptual gateways.” These gateways lead to thinking and knowledge which were previously inaccessible, sometimes troublesome (Meyer & Land, 2003), and represented transformed understanding (Kiley & Wisker, 2009). Group members’ reflective responses were collected and thematic analysed to determine the meaningful outcomes of participation in the community of learners. Readers will have the opportunity to view their own learning in terms of threshold concepts, and will discuss the value of a community of learners at various levels in post-secondary education. Readers will also be encouraged to examine their own learning through threshold concepts and to consider the value of developing communities of learners. This topic will be of interest to graduate students and those who support them, such as supervisors and administrators, as it has implications for graduate student progression and program completion. The findings from our study support the position that threshold concepts are a useful framework for supporting graduate level learning (Kiley & Wisker, 2009).

Presenters
NC

Natalie Currie-Patterson

Natalie Currie-Patterson, OCT is a PhD Candidate in the Faculty of Education at Western University in London, Ontario. Her research investigates how educators understand and enact Indigenous education policies in Ontario's secondary schools, their professional development opportunities, and teacher training needs.
avatar for Kathryn Hansen

Kathryn Hansen

PhD Candidate/ Professor, Western University/ St. Clair College
Kathryn Hansen is a PhD candidate at Western University in London, Ontario. Her research interests are generated from her background in community college teaching and adult learning. Her current research explores early career faculty preparation and development as a key to quality program delivery and student success.
PM

Phillipa Myers

Phillipa Myers is a doctoral candidate in Critical Policy, Equity, and Leadership Studies at Western University’s Faculty of Education. Based on a breadth and depth of diverse teaching experiences, Phillipa’s current research explores the experiences of immigrant girls in Canadian schools, and focuses on students of Latin American origin.
avatar for Joelle Nagle

Joelle Nagle

Western University
Joelle Nagle is a PhD candidate at Western University in London, Ontario. Her research interests include the professional learning of teachers in graduate education, multiliteracies, and multimodalities in teaching and learning, as well as using social media as a venue for professional learning and academic knowledge mobilization.

Additional Authors
IM

Irene Melabiotis

Irene Melabiotis, MEd, OCT, is a doctoral candidate at Western University's Faculty of Education, in the area of applied psychology. She is an Ontario Certified Teacher (OCT) and a supply teacher with the Toronto District School Board. Her research interests include arts integration, inclusive education, and learning motivation.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.28 - Choice architecture: The challenge of engaging second entry nursing students in establishing professional identity
Faculty in a two year second entry nursing program face many challenges when engaging students in learning that is intended to help them develop professional competencies and an identity as a nurse. To address ways of supporting students’ engagement, Choice Architecture (Thaler, Sunstein & Balz, 2010) inspires some thought. Choice architects create conditions in which choices are made. In that environment the choice architect uses Nudges, actions that promote behavior change (Hansen & Jespersen (2013)).


In this presentation, Type 2 (reflective and rational) Transparent Nudges will be discussed. These help students understand the reason behind prompting behavior change, and valuing the theoretical base for that learning. If a “Nudge” of the student towards developing particular competencies and capacities is made explicit by Faculty, students may more readily appreciate the theoretical dimensions of their learning. This poster presentation will illustrate how the Transparent Nudge is enacted, for example, asking students to discuss clinical assessments in light of developing professional competencies in an essay assignment, or helping them consider how a particular pedagogy or theoretical perspective can engage them in a certain type of learning.


This poster will provide a base for discussions among the presenter and participants through a textual presentation of these ideas. It is hoped the focus of the discussions will contribute to ideas for including rationale for students’ learning through the program of study, along with encouraging reflection on the contributions of this learning to their development as a health care professional.


Hansen, P. & Jespersen, A (2013) Nudge and the manipulation of choice: A framework for the responsible use of the nudge approach to behavior change in public policy. European Journal of Risk Regulation 1, 3-28.


Thaler, Richard H. and Sunstein, Cass R. and Balz, John P., (2010) Choice Architecture .Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1583509 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1583509

Presenters
PK

Pamela Khan

Pamela Khan is an Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, at the Lawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto. She has taught a diverse range of subject areas, including health policy, health systems, ethics and mental health. Areas of interest include mental health care, mental health law, diversity, ethics and undergraduate education.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.29 - How Moral Psychology Can Inform Writing Assignment Design
The argumentative paper is a standard measure of assessment for many courses in higher education. Since the purpose of these papers is to persuade the reader, emphasis tends to be placed on sound reasoning, proportioning beliefs to the available evidence, and providing good reasons. In the process, critical introspection is often neglected. Indeed, students often fail to get beyond providing a moral rationalization for a viewpoint to which they are affectively predisposed. Argumentative papers tend not to encourage students to examine why they feel and believe a certain thing nor do they interrogate how their moral feelings and beliefs have been culturally shaped.


Over the last two decades, neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers have significantly enhanced our understanding of the nature of our moral judgments. Calling into question the traditional view that moral judgments are primarily a matter of deliberate reasoning (Kohlberg, 1984), scholars now agree that they are primarily based on an affective response. That is, moral judgments are more a matter of feeling than reason (Greene, 2013; Haidt, 2001). As Joshua Greene (2013) writes, “The moral rationalizer feels a certain way about a moral issue and then makes up a rational-sounding justification for that feeling” (p. 300).


These findings in moral psychology have important implications for teaching and learning, particularly in academic disciplines that engage in moral questions. This poster will focus on the implications these findings have for writing assignment design. While a well-executed argumentative paper is certainly a marker for some key critical thinking skills, it does not necessarily measure a student’s ability to inquire into the affective core of his or her beliefs. But this is a fundamental skill that all good critical thinkers require.


How can we encourage students in their writing to move beyond rationalizing their moral beliefs – persuasive though their accounts may be – to think about and question their affective core? This poster will present a scaffolding writing model grounded in moral psychology that faculty can use to fully develop the critical thinking skills of students. Emphasis will be placed on reflective writing.

Presenters
avatar for James Southworth

James Southworth

Writing Consultant, Wilfrid Laurier University
James Southworth is a Writing Consultant at Wilfrid Laurier University. He completed his PhD in philosophy at the University of Western Ontario in 2014 with an expertise in moral psychology and ethics.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.30 - Supporting Group Work and Integrative Learning in Visual Studies: Getting to Know Each Other in Large Lectures
Unique challenges faced by educators teaching large lecture classes in higher education include student engagement, class size, collaborative work, and getting to know the students. Group work is incorporated into the class so that students use the groups’ collective knowledge and skills to their advantage establishing a community of learners. In a visual studies course students were introduced to the area of visual culture, focusing on key subjects in art and design and their relationship to social theory in the Modern period. The large lecture was structured around discussions so that students made connections and reflected on previous knowledge. Reflexive activities encouraged learners to construct meaning and understandings about visual content shared with the entire class. Strategies used in the visual studies class were incorporating class discussions based on weekly reading, time for group meetings, group meetings with the professor, and reflective activities incorporated into lectures using visual images. The goals of this poster session are to (1) share ideas and teaching practice that support group work in a large lecture format; (2) engage in discussion with educators on ways to interact and get to know who your students are especially in a large lecture format; and (3) using practical examples that can be incorporated into any lecture.

Presenters
BM

Bernie Murray

Associate Professor, Ryerson University
Bernie Murray is an Associate Professor in the School of Fashion at Ryerson University. She is completing her doctoral degree in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development (CSTD) from (OISE) at the University of Toronto. Bernie’s research focuses on creative thinking in arts disciplines and the scholarship of teaching and learning.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.31 - Empower Learners and Enhance their Communication Skills
“Empower Learners and Enhance their Communication Skills”


Typically students attracted to technological studies are kinesthetic learners that have demonstrated lower enthusiasm and inclination toward learning skills that are rooted in traditional communication studies. Relevancy in curriculum creation and holistic sensory delivery are key ingredients necessary to captivate the technological student and drive effective course development.


The intent of this poster style presentation is to display the creation of five innovative teaching activities, developed as part of a research and innovation project, for faculty within the construction sector to empower learners, enhance their communication skills, and help foster an effective learning environment. These activities are designed to encourage active participation in speaking, listening (Card Task, Toolbox Talk), reading, comprehension (Instructional Video Series), and written (Weekly Lab Workbook, Building a Technical Report), skills through experiential learning, reflective practice, and narrative inquiry. It is proposed that when subject specialists “uncover” these activities, holistic student engagement will occur and real or perceived learning barriers will be minimized.



As educators, finding ways to engage learners is critical to a meaningful experience for all stakeholders. Through informal dialogue STHLE participants will be encouraged to reflect on their own curriculum development strategies to generate innovative teaching activities applicable to their subject matter and teaching environment.


Learning Outcomes


After viewing this poster presentation participants will be encouraged to:






  • Integrate elements of the various communication skills into their curriculum development.






  • “Uncover”, through experiential learning, an innovative and strategic approach to purposeful curriculum development.





Presenters
SG

Steven Gedies

Steve is a carpenter by trade with a degree in Physical Education and a Masters of Education degree in curriculum studies. He has taught Building Construction for the last 23 years at both the secondary level within the Thames Valley District School Board (TVDSB) and Fanshawe College in the Donald J Smith School of Building Technology. Steve is a recipient of the TVDSB Award of Distinction for his commitment to learning and teaching as well as... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.32 - Undergraduate Grades as Mediated by Study Strategies as Opposed to Learning Styles
Many students believe they fall under a certain 'learning style' (Kinesthetic, Visual, Auditory etc.) with which they learn best, however there is very little evidence to support that learning styles exist (Rohrer & Pashler 2011). We are proposing that ideas concerning 'learning styles' be abandoned for a more in-depth view of effective studying strategies. We have examined study habits recorded across 2 midterms and a final examination with a particular interest in which study strategies were most and least effective, the effect of studying with previous midterms, and if these study strategies changed over time. We have defined study strategies as the combination of study material with study method (i.e. Lecture Notes; Read Over). Research was conducted in a first year conceptually- based biology course. A multiple correspondence analysis was conducted on the data to organise grades and the study strategies used to achieve them. There was a very clear organisation of grades and study strategies for the final exam. The results for the first and second midterm were less clear. The study materials tended to group together by the method that they were used to study. Reading and recopying materials tended to clump together and were associated with low-average grades. Use of the discussion board, teaching friends, discussing with friends and summarising were associated with high grades. We have found that using previous year's examinations to study from did not have a benefit to grades, and in some cases was detrimental. Study habits were also examined for change across each examination within students and as of this writing is still undergoing analysis. By helping to give students the tools to make their education more effective, it not only increases information retention and grades, it also delivers a means to be more active in their own education.


Citations


Rohrer, D. & Pashler, H. (2011) Learning styles: where's the evidence? Medical Education, 46: 630-635

Additional Authors (not presenting):
Steve Newmaster, T. Ryan Gregory, Shoshanah Jacobs

Presenters
SJ

Shoshanah Jacobs

Dr. Shoshanah Jacobs is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of Guelph. Her research focuses on knowledge translation and transfer.
DO

Dean Orr

I am an undergraduate research student who is very interested in education, learning, and memory. My first job as a camp counsellor and outdoor centre instructor sparked an interest for education that I have since combined with my love for science. I am studying in the College of Biological Sciences at the University of Guelph.

Additional Authors

Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.33 - Critical thinking in dental hygiene education: Examining student perception
Empowering learners to effect change suggests that learners acquire skills to become lifelong learners; one such skill is critical thinking. Critical thinking is a high level cognitive function desired in graduates of higher education, including professional education programs such as dental hygiene (Kahlke & White, 2013; Behar-Horenstein & Niu, 2011). Research on the general topic of dental hygiene education is limited; research specific to critical thinking in dental hygiene education is even more rare (Notgarnie, 2011). This research is designed to deepen understanding of dental hygiene students’ perceptions and experiences of acquiring critical thinking skills in their professional education. A basic qualitative study was selected to start the discussion and data were gathered during a focus group followed by individual interviews. The sample comprised of seven recent graduates of a two-year, community college-based, dental hygiene program in Ontario, Canada. Inductive data analysis using an interpretive perspective was conducted to identify categories, patterns, and themes in order to uncovering meaning to address the research questions. This thematic data analysis indicated students valued the strategies employed to learn critical thinking. Participants indicated their critical thinking began with acquiring base knowledge on theory related to the field of dental hygiene followed by developing a thought process using case scenarios with small group work and discussion. The clinical setting was noted as a real and challenging environment to apply critical thinking. Participants valued being offered a variety of activities aimed at developing their critical thinking. Many of the findings of this exploratory study align with research on developing critical thinking in adult education and professional education (Bassham, Irwin, Nardone, & Wallace, 2011; Brookfield, 2012). This basic qualitative study provides beneficial preliminary information about how dental hygiene students learn critical thinking.


References


Bassham, G., Irwin, W., Nardone, H., & Wallace, J.M. (2011). Critical thinking: A student’s introduction (4th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.


Behar-Horenstein, L.S., & Niu, L. (2011). Teaching critical thinking skills in higher education: A review of the literature. Journal of College Teaching and Learning, 8(2), 25-41. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.stfx.ca/docview/857923396/abstract/1379B4FE3E2229FE312/4?accountid=13803


Brookfield, S. (2012). Teaching for critical thinking: Tools and techniques to help students question their assumptions. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


Kahlke, R., & White, J. (2013). Critical thinking in health sciences education: Considering "three waves". Creative Education, 4(12A), 21-29. doi: 10.4236/ce.2013.412A1004


Notgarnie, H. (2011). Critical thinking of United States dental hygiene students (Doctoral dissertation, University of Pheonix). Retrieved from http://proquest.umi.com.libproxy.stfx.ca/pqdlink?did=2357531201&Fmt=6&VType=PQD&VInst=PROD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1342065225&clientId=18854



Presenters
HS

Helen Symons

Helen Symons RDH BSc MAdEd is a college educator in the Dental Hygiene Program at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario. This research project was done in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Adult Education, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.34 - High school students enrolled in university: 10 reasons why it’s a good thing
Concurrent enrollment programs can empower high-ability learners; they provide opportunities for learners to direct their own education and advance their learning in areas of interest (Dare & Nowicki, 2015). Concurrent enrollment programs also allow universities to showcase their offerings to high-ability learners. Drawing on established theory and current research, our presentation demonstrates how concurrent enrollment can effect meaningful change. This presentation will be of interest to post-secondary institutions seeking to partner in success through student success offerings.


In our study, we used Deci and Ryan’s (1985) self-determination theory to frame students’ motivations for participating in concurrent enrollment. Study participants were 21 high-achieving secondary students concurrently enrolled at Western University. Through the program, students took one first-year university course in addition to their full-time high school studies. We used group concept mapping (Trochim, 1989), to investigate students’ perspectives on concurrent enrollment. We chose this approach because it is highly participatory, and it applies rigourous statistical analyses to qualitative data. First, students brainstormed reasons for participating in the concurrent enrollment program, then they sorted and rated the generated reasons. We analyzed the data using multi-dimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis to create a map of key concepts. Our findings showed that high-achieving students engage in concurrent enrollment “as a way to gather information used in making decisions about postsecondary education” (Dare & Nowicki, 2015, p. 261).


Through this presentation, attendees will learn how universities can strengthen their student success offerings, and support learners’ transitions to university, through concurrent enrollment programs. Our infographic poster provides information of interest to a diverse range of attendees including educators, school counsellors, university success counsellors, and department leaders. Attendees may use this information to effect change by introducing or expanding concurrent enrollment programs in their institutions.

Presenters
EN

Elizabeth Nowicki

Elizabeth Nowicki is an associate professor at Western University and a member of the Ontario College of Teachers. Her research draws upon educational, developmental, and social psychology and focuses on social interactions at school, implicit and explicit attitudes about ability and gender, and children’s views on social inclusion and exclusion.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.35 - How Canadian universities support and partner with students to facilitate success in mathematics
First year mathematics is a significant gate-keeper of post-secondary students’ success in STEM-based disciplines. Completing post-secondary education within a four-year range and overall post-secondary success in STEM disciplines have been shown to be related to success in first year mathematics (Parker, 2005). The estimate of failure and withdrawal rates in undergraduate mathematics courses are alarmingly high, ranging anywhere from 30% to 60% (Complete College America, 2012). For some countries, low performance in international testing coupled with lower participation and success levels in post-secondary STEM-based disciplines is resulting in the belief that a “math crisis” is underway which is proposed to have long-term effects to economies (Conference Board of Canada, 2014).


Post-secondary institutions support student success in post-secondary mathematics and invest in providing supports. They are also gate-keepers to future participation in STEM-based disciplines. This pan-Canadian study examines the kinds of supports and policies used to facilitate success in post-secondary mathematics by English speaking universities who offer mathematics degrees (62 in total). French speaking universities in Canada were, unfortunately, not included to language limitations of the study authors. We examined the types of degrees offered, entrance averages, prerequisites, placement tests, remediation processes, accessibility of online information, mathematics help centres, courses for non-mathematics majors, and special initiatives for underrepresented groups. Some results include: (1) Math help centre hours ranged from 2 to 109 hours/week; (2) Non-credit remedial courses are common; (3) Students’ self-selection or on high school grades predominantly determined course selection; (4) Prerequisites varied. Our poster summarizes the results of our study, highlighting interesting findings. Full details will be disseminated in a future publication which is currently in preparation. This research will be of interest to faculty, teaching support staff (e.g., lab coordinators, tutors, etc.), and also learning services specialists who are often charged with developing remedial programming for students.

Presenters
CW

Chester Weatherby

Dr. Chester Weatherby is a tenure-track (Professional Teaching) Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Wilfrid Laurier University.
DW

Douglas Woolford

Dr. Douglas Woolford is an Associate Professor of Environmetrics in the Department of Statistical and Actuarial Sciences at Western University.

Additional Authors
DK

Donna Kotsopoulos

Dr. Donna Kotsopoulos is a Professor in Education, cross appointed to Mathematics at Wilfrid Laurier University where she directs the Mathematical Brains Lab. She is a former Associate Vice-President Research (acting), Graduate Coordinator, and Associate Dean, an Ontario Certified Teacher (OCT), and she was recently awarded the Hoffman-Little Award for Faculty for excellence in teaching, research, and professional endeavor, and an OCUFA... Read More →
LK

Laaraib Khattak

Miss. Laaraib Khattak holds a B.Ed. from Wilfrid Laurier University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.36 - A new service and a new working space in the faculty : a Swiss-army-knife specially designed for students!
Historically, higher education in France has always been very discipline-centered with an emphasis on scientific knowledge and hardly any focus on professional skills like computer skills, foreign languages, personal development, or career counselling. Since 2007, France’s “Law Relative to Universities” (LRU) has assigned a new mission to French universities which now have to assist students in developing their employability potential. Almost ten years after the law was first implemented, French universities are still experimenting and looking for an efficient model. In order to fill this need and in the context of the lack of a centralized career service, the faculty of sciences of the University of Poitiers, a middle-sized multi-disciplinary university, decided to set up a new department called “Languages and Career Services”. The purpose of this new department is to develop students’ transversal skills so as to boost their employability potential. The LCS is primarily a teaching department as it trains students in modern languages and organizes student-oriented programs to develop transversal and communication skills that can boost their employability. More originally, it also hosts a co-working space based on the concept of a “fablab” where students can train their practical skills in various software, in 3D scanning and printing, or take part to various workshops (CVs and cover letters, bibliographical research, report writing, mind-mapping tools, drama, English conversation…). These workshops are managed by professionals, university staff, or by students with specific skills and experience. The aim of our poster presentation is to exchange about our respective practices with colleagues who have been implied in similar departments for a longer period and to discuss the pros and cons of this approach to the topical subject of students’ employability potential.

Presenters
avatar for Isabelle Lucet

Isabelle Lucet

University of Poitiers, France
Isabelle Lucet qualified as an English teacher and specialized in teaching English to science university students twenty years ago. She first graduated in English studies and later in Education sciences and has always been interested in innovative teaching methods. She currently heads the Languages and career services of the faculty of science at the University of Poitiers, France.
JR

James Robert

James Robert spent more than ten years teaching secondary school pupils. He has developed skills in career management and now teaches at university level and has specialized in the promotion of students’ employability. He co-heads the Languages and career services of the faculty of science at the University of Poitiers, France.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.37 - The Development of Integrated and Experiential Teamwork Activities
Teams have become the default work structure in many organizations, however compared to industry representatives, both university educators and students have been found to underestimate the value of teamwork and communication skills (Nguyen, 1998). As such, teamwork skills are rarely “taught” in professional engineering curricula and instead, students are often expected to develop teamwork and leadership skills via a sink-or-swim approach (Lingard & Barkataki, 2011). This can lead to students who are underprepared to work effectively in industry.


In response, a committee of representatives from the Centre for Teaching and Learning, the Student Success Office and the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Waterloo are developing a series of integrated and experiential learning activities for students to acquire knowledge and confidence in their teamwork skills. This poster will focus on the design, development and assessment of the project in addition to providing insight on lessons learned and next steps. Emphasis will be placed on the transferability of the model to both engineering and non-engineering programs that could benefit from adopting a similar integrated and collaborative model of teamwork training.


Participants will be able to:




  • recall key successes and challenges of the program


  • know, at a high level, the instructional design approach, implementation plan and assessment methodology


  • infer the feasibility of adopting a similar initiative at their home institution


  • compare similar programs/initiatives in home institutions by evaluating our current program and process



Presenters
EJ

Erin Jobidon

Erin Jobidon works at the University of Waterloo in the Student Success Office as an Academic Development Specialist working with the Engineering, Math and Environment faculties.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.38 - Mindfulness Meditation in Education: The Effect of Brief, Online Mindfulness Meditation on Working Memory Capacity and Lecture Comprehension
One important predictor of academic performance is the ability to allocate attentional resources effectively, best captured by measures of working memory capacity (WMC; Engle, 2002). Increasing WMC has been shown to improve performance across a wide range of cognitive domains such as reading comprehension and note-taking (Cowan, 2012). WMC may be diminished during periods of anxiety (Eysenck & Calvo, 1992) and mind wandering (Mooneyham & Schooler, 2013), which are pervasive amongst undergraduate students (Szpunar et. al., 2013; Regehr, Glancy & Pitts, 2012).

The present study explored the impact of a four-day, online mindfulness meditation training program on working memory capacity, state and trait anxiety, mind wandering, and lecture comprehension in undergraduate students. 47 undergraduate students were randomly assigned to a mindfulness group, a relaxation control group or a second control group that listened to an excerpt from the Hobbit. Contrary to previous literature (Mrazeck et. al., 2013; Zeidan et. al., 2010), we were not able to observe a difference between groups in WMC, mind wandering, or anxiety. Surprisingly, the audiobook control group showed increased lecture comprehension and decreased mind-wandering.

 In this session, we will present data collected through this experiment and make recommendations about how future studies may modify meditation training programs to improve performance outcomes.

References:

Cowan, N. (2012). Working memory capacity. New York, New York, USA: Psychology Press.

Engle, R. W. (2002). Working memory capacity as executive attention. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 11(1), 19-23.

Eysenck, M. W., & Calvo, M. G. (1992). Anxiety and performance: The processing efficiency theory. Cognition & Emotion, 6(6), 409-434.

Mooneyham, B. W., & Schooler, J. W. (2013). The costs and benefits of mind-wandering: A review. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 67(1), 11-18. doi: 10.1037/a0031569

Mrazek, M. D., Franklin, M. S., Phillips, D. T., Baird, B., & Schooler, J. W. (2013). Mindfulness training improves working memory capacity and GRE performance while reducing mind wandering. Psychological Science, 24(5), 776-781. doi:10.1177/0956797612459659.

Regehr, C., Glancy, D. & Pitts, A. (2012). Interventions to reduce stress in university students: A review and meta-analysis. Journal of Affective Disorders, 148, 1-11. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2012.11.026

Szpunar, K. K., Moulton, S.T., & Schacter, D.L.. (2013). Mind wandering and education: From the classroom to online learning. Frontiers in Psychology, 4 (1), 495, 1-7. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00495. http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00495.

Zeidan, F., Johnson, S. K., Diamond, B. J., David, Z., & Goolkasian, P. (2010). Mindfulness meditation improves cognition: Evidence of brief mental training. Consciousness and Cognition, 19(2), 597-605. doi:10.1016/j.concog.2010.03.014

Presenters
SK

Samiksha Kaul

Samiksha Kaul was an undergraduate student at McMaster University. She worked with Amy Pachai, Dr. Ayesha Khan, Anisa Morava and Schevene Singh on the Mindfulness Project as part of her undergraduate thesis.
AM

Anisa Morava

Anisa Morava is an undergraduate student at McMaster University. She worked with Amy Pachai, Dr. Ayesha Khan, Samiksha Kaul and Schevene Singh on the Mindfulness Project as part of an independent research project course.
SS

Schevene Singh

Schevene Sigh is an undergraduate student at McMaster University. He worked with Amy Pachai, Dr. Ayesha Khan, Anisa Morava and Samiksha Kaul on the Mindfulness Project as part of an independent research project course.

Additional Authors
AP

Amy Pachai

Amy Pachai is a PhD student in Dr. Joe Kim’s lab in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behavior at McMaster. Her research interests focus on studying the cognitive mechanisms involved in mind wandering to better understand factors that affect the how often mind wandering occurs, especially during online lectures.
AK

Ayesha Khan

Dr. Ayesha Khan is an Assistant Professor at McMaster with the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behavior. Her research interests explore enhancement of undergraduate student experience through experiential education and ways through which social loafing can be decreased in group work.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.39 - Identifying factors contributing to work readiness in the rehabilitation disciplines
“Organisations are increasingly interested in the extent to which graduate applicants possess the skills and attributes that make them "prepared" or "ready" for success in today's rapidly changing work environment” (Caballero & Walker, 2010, p.16). ‘Practice readiness’ or ‘work readiness’, as this is frequently referred to, is an important consideration in curriculum development and renewal (Gibson & Molloy, 2012). As a step to support curriculum for professional skill development, a clear understanding is needed of the specific factors that contribute to work readiness. Determining which professional skills are key for practice readiness will guide development of explicit curricular expectations and robust student assessment (Kern, 1998), and ultimately support student success on entry into the workforce. The example of Speech Language Pathology is used to illustrate the approach taken within our faculty. This study used a series of small group and individual interviews with clinicians, employers, and representatives from professional bodies from Speech Language Pathology to explore understandings of work readiness and identify factors that contribute to it. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify the factors. This presentation describes the steps involved in identifying factors contributing to work readiness in the rehabilitation disciplines. Preliminary findings, next steps, and implications for other disciplines will also be reported.

References

Cabellero, C. L., & Walker, A. (2010). Work readiness in graduate recruitment and selection: A review of current assessment methods. Journal of teaching and learning for graduate employability, 1(1), 13-25.

Gibson, S. & Molloy, E. (2013). Professional skill development needs of newly graduated health professionals: A systematic literature review. Focus on Health Professional Education: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal 13 (3): 187-191.

Kern, D. E. (1998). Curriculum development for medical education: a six-step approach. JHU Press.

Presenters
TP

Teresa Paslawski

Teresa Paslawski is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, at the University of Alberta.

Additional Authors
JD

Jessica Del Genio

Jessica Del Genio is a recent MSc-SLP graduate from the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, at the University of Alberta.
LM

Lu-Anne McFarlane

Lu-Anne McFarlane is an Associate Professor and Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, at the University of Alberta.
SS

Salima Suleman

Salima Suleman is a PhD student in the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta with training in Speech Language Pathology (MSc-SLP).


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.49 - Collaborative testing: Are two (or more) heads better than one?
Collaborative (2-stage) testing is an assessment strategy that has been shown to improve student performance on multiple-choice exams, and to increase short-term knowledge retention compared to traditional testing strategies (Gilley & Clarkston, 2014; Rao et al., 2002). The purpose of this study was therefore to determine if 2-stage testing improves student performance on long-answer questions and additionally, whether 2-stage testing increases long-term knowledge retention beyond one week, as these are areas that have not yet been addressed (Bloom, 2009; Cortright et al., 2003). Two undergraduate courses (Exercise Physiology, n = 94 and Biochemistry, n = 56) administered identical protocols involving an in-class 2-stage midterm containing multiple-choice (MC) and long-answer (LA) questions, an unannounced individual short-term retention test 1 week later that was followed by an instructor-led review of the midterm, and lastly a long-term retention test 6 weeks later. Performance was measured as the grade difference between the collaborative and individual midterms, and retention as the grade difference between each retention test and the individual midterm. 2-stage testing was found to significantly improve performance on both MC and LA questions (16.5% ± 1.29% vs. 20.6% ± 1.41%, p

Presenters
GN

Genevieve Newton

Genevieve Newton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Health & Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph, and the secretary for SoTL Canada. Genevieve conducts SoTL research in several areas, including case-based learning, educational technologies (such as mobile applications and lecture capture), and collaborative testing.
RR

Rebecca Rajakaruna

Rebecca Rajakaruna is a fourth year Biomedical Sciences student at the University of Guelph. Rebecca has a keen interest in higher education, and has been conducting research in the area of assessment for several semesters. She is also a Supported Learning Group leader.
KR

Kerry Ritchie

Dr. Kerry Ritchie is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph. Her SoTL research focuses on strategies for teaching critical thinking and communication skills, with special attention given to novel methods for scaling these practices to suit large class sizes.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.50 - SoTL Perspectives and Supports at One Institution
Educational research across campuses generally originates in a teaching challenge within a discipline-specific classroom where faculty tackle their own investigation, often without support or collaboration (Felten, 2013). While Centres for Teaching and Learning offer various supports for pedagogical research, it is unclear which forms of support eventually lead to teaching change and how teaching improvement can be measured. Introductory workshops on teaching scholarship remain a staple and a recent SoTL Canada membership survey (2015) confirms this as the predominant approach.


This poster documents SoTL interests and supports at one institution. Survey data gives us a picture of participants who have completed or are interested in completing a SoTL study; events and experiences that triggered an interest in SoTL; perceptions of the importance of SoTL in their own teaching, student learning, in their department, and within the institution as a whole. We also identity the challenges faculty experience in studying their teaching practice and the types of support they need to address those challenges. Other institutions will benefit from identification of the SoTL research supports (e.g. workshops, research methods support, collaboration, grants, ethics support, writing groups, etc.) that faculty prioritize in their study of teaching and learning.


This interactive poster incorporates dotmocracy so viewers can rank the importance of SoTL in their scholarly work and we also offer whiteboard markers so you can contribute to a list of SoTL enablers, barriers, and triggers. Overall, our poster will enable you to:






  • Identify events and experiences that trigger educators’ interest and engagement in SoTL,






  • Examine your institutional SoTL supports in light of study findings, and




  • Explore opportunities for weaving SoTL into institutional culture.



Presenters
avatar for Klodiana Kolomitro

Klodiana Kolomitro

Klodiana is an educational developer with the Centre for Teaching and Learning, and cross-appointed with the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences at Queen’s University.
CL

Cory Laverty

Dr. Cory Laverty is Teaching and Learning Specialist and Librarian at Queen’s University’s Centre for Teaching and Learning. Her research interests are in the development and assessment of information literacy curricula, learning support for faculty and librarians, and undergraduate student research. |
DS

Denise Stockley

Professor and Scholar in Higher Education, Queen's University
Dr. Denise Stockley is a Professor and Scholar in Higher Education with the Office of the Provost (Teaching and Learning Portfolio), seconded to the Faculty of Health Sciences, and cross-appointed to the Faculty of Education. She is the past Chair of the Awards Portfolio for STLHE and the current Vice-President of STLHE.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.51 - Can Collaborative Testing Within an Undergraduate Neuroanatomy Course Increase Student Retention and Minimize Anxiety? A Pilot Study.
The organization of an undergraduate course can assist student centered learning. Changing evaluation practices within higher education can positively affect student learning by reducing testing anxiety. This pilot study seeks to investigate the suitability of collaborative testing as an assessment tool within a 12-week undergraduate neuroanatomy course. As part of the course design, students will complete three term tests and a final exam, where all four assessments use the collaborative testing assessment strategy. Tests include multiple choice, short answer, and diagram questions. Changes in testing anxiety and levels of long term retention will be investigated and measured using a modified version of the Test Anxiety Inventory Likert scale and test performance (Taylor and Deane, 2010). By analyzing the suitability of collaborative learning within this course, this study will assist in developing effective assessment strategies that can empower learners to gain the most of their post-secondary education.

Current research involving collaborative testing has measured changes in anxiety and student retention using collaborative tests which consist primarily of multiple choice questions but also open-ended short answer questions, however, studies have yet to focus on measuring long term retention(Hanson and Carpenter, 2011). It is anticipated that as levels of testing anxiety are tracked, high levels will occur during the first term test and will subsequently decrease as students become accustomed to the collaborative environment. Due to the conversational nature of this assessment strategy it is also anticipated that discussions generated by students during the assessment will aid in increasing student performance and long term retention. Ultimately, by engaging in this poster presentation, participants will be able to engage in discussions with the presenter about:
  • preliminary findings of this pilot study
  • methods used to implement the collaborative testing strategy.
  • innovative ways to analyze student anxiety and retention.

Hanson, M., & Carpenter, D. (2011). Integrating cooperative learning into classroom testing: implications for nursing education and practice. Nursing Education Perspectives, 32(4): 270-273.

Taylor, J. & Deane, F. (2010). Development? of a short form of the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI). The Journal of General Psychology, 129(2): 127-136.

Presenters
KB

Kaitlyn Bertram

Kaitlyn Bertram is a Masters of Biomedical Science student who graduated with Honours BSc in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Guelph. Lisa Robertson and Lorraine Jadeski co-advise Kaitlyn and are Assistant and Associate Professors in the Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Health and Nutritional Sciences respectively. Kaitlyn Bertram will be presenting on behalf of both Lisa Robertson and Lorraine Jadeski.

Additional Authors
LR

Lisa Robertson

Assistant Professor in the department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Guelph.
LJ

Lorraine Jadeski

Dr. Lorraine Jadeski is the director of the Human Anatomy Program in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.52 - SoTL Annotations: Point of Entry Literature for Research on Teaching and Learning
Faculty and educational developers engaging in scholarship may have no point of entry for literature for their investigations (Weimer, 2010). A frequent challenge is finding literature on a topic that provides starting points for further inquiry or grasping scholarly debates in unfamiliar literature. Moreover, as Christensen Hughes and Mighty (2010) note, “researchers have discovered much about teaching and learning in higher education, but … dissemination and uptake of this information have been limited. As such, the impact of educational research on faculty-teaching practice and the student-learning experience has been negligible” (p. 4). Disseminating pedagogical research in ways that connect it to practice continues to be a challenge (Poole, 2009).


To address these challenges, and with EDC grant support, I have created a searchable website of key literature about teaching and learning, each entry comprising a topic, alternative keywords, a brief overview, annotated key literature, and a concise description of debates on the topic.


Poster attendees will:




  • Be able to access the website for personal and colleagues’ SoTL literature searches


  • Have the opportunity to engage as authors of website entries


  • Collaborate on future directions by suggesting additional topics for the database




The poster will introduce the website, which is intended as an evolving tool. I welcome contributions from others, with authorship noted.


Christensen Hughes, J., & Mighty, J. (2010). Taking stock: Research on teaching and learning in higher education. Kingston, ON: McGill-Queen’s University Press.


Poole, G. (2009). The pursuit of the scholarship of teaching and learning in Canada: Good, but not good enough. Keynote presentation at the Canadian Society for Studies in Higher Education annual conference, Ottawa, Ontario, May 25-27.


Weimer, M. (2008). Positioning scholarly work on teaching and learning. International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 2(1).





Presenters
NS

Nicola Simmons

Nicola Simmons is in Graduate and Undergraduate Education, Brock. Past roles include Founding Chair of SoTL Canada; Vice-President, Canada of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; Vice-President, SoTL, for Canada’s Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE); and Chair of Canada’s Educational Developers Caucus. |


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.53 - The Social Loafing Problem: Assessment of a Novel Tool to Increase Accountability in Students during Group Work
Group work is an essential component of learning. Its benefits include increased productivity, enhanced communication, and improvements in critical thinking (Drury, Kay, & Losberg, 2003; Pfaff & Huddleston, 2003). One challenge with group work is “social loafing”; a psychological phenomenon in which a group member exerts less effort in comparison to working alone (William and Karau, 1991). Therefore, social loafing can be a major contributor to negative group-work experiences (Teng & Luo,m 2015; Aggarwal & O’Brien, 2008) and social loafers can disrupt team dynamics and significantly affect productivity (Drury, Kay, & Losberg, 2003). This is a major concern for educators since positive experience with group work also aids students in preparation of their roles in the professional world (Pfaff & Huddleston, 2003; Chen, Donahue & Klimoski, 2004).

Our study used the “Accountability Matrix”, a novel tool meant to increase accountability in each group member. This matrix is a tracking system that records each group member’s attendance, punctuality, task assignment and completion. It is a tool for both educators and students to track group progress. We are using a survey created by Cantwell and Andrews (2002) to assess feelings towards group work in a second-year undergraduate course with an enrollment of about 200 students in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour at McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada). In this study, students work in groups of 4 during their weekly tutorials over a single semester (January to April 2016). A total of eight tutorials were randomly assigned to receive either one of two interventions: [1] The Accountability Matrix group- access to group work tracking tool (i.e., to record attendance, punctuality, task assignment and completion) designed specifically for this study or [2] The Accountability (Control) Matrix group – access to attendance only. We predict that students in the Accountability Matrix group will report greater positive feelings toward group work as compared to the Accountability (Control) Matrix group.

Selected References:

Cantwell, R. H., & Andrews, B. (2002). Cognitive and psychological factors underlying secondary school students' feelings towards group work.Educational Psychology, 22(1), 75-91.

Chen, G., Donahue, L. M., & Klimoski, R. J. (2004). Training undergraduates to work in organizational teams. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 3(1), 27-40.

Drury, H., Kay, J., & Losberg, W. (2003). Student satisfaction with groupwork in undergraduate computer science: do things get better?. In Proceedings of the fifth Australasian conference on Computing education,20, 77-85.

Pfaff, E., & Huddleston, P. (2003). Does it matter if I hate teamwork? What impacts student attitudes toward teamwork. Journal of Marketing Education,25(1), 37-45.

Presenters
SA

Sogol Afshar

Sogol Afshar, graduated from the Department of PNB with an honours degree in Psychology.
LH

Lydia Hicks

Lydia Hicks, second year student in the Department of PNB.

Additional Authors
AK

Ayesha Khan

Dr. Ayesha Khan is an Assistant Professor at McMaster with the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behavior. Her research interests explore enhancement of undergraduate student experience through experiential education and ways through which social loafing can be decreased in group work.
CC

Cheryl Chow

PhD student from the MiNDS Neuroscience Graduate Program.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.54 - Student Transition from College to University: Using a Pre-Interview Activity for the Recall and Reflection of Experience
Life is a series of transitions and an inevitable human experience; therefore a phenomenon of interest to researchers from a wide variety of fields. The purpose of this exploratory case study is to add to what is known about transitions in nursing education for students, specifically those who begin at the college site of a collaborative baccalaureate program. By uncovering the experience of students, academics can deepen their understanding of the complexity of student transition, enabling the development of strategies to support student success, program completion, and graduation. This presentation will focus on the use of a pre-interview activity in the data collection and analysis phases of the study. This activity offered participants another way to reflect upon and recall their experience of transition from college to university, providing the participant and the researcher opportunities to deepen their understanding of a complex phenomenon.

Presenters
MA

Mary Anne Krahn

Mary Anne Krahn is a Registered Nurse with a clinical background in paediatric nursing and broad range of experience in nursing education. She is the Program Chair in the School of Nursing at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario and a doctoral student in the Faculty of Education at Western University.

Additional Authors
MV

Melody Viczko

Melody Viczko is an Assistant Professor in Critical Policy, Equity and Leadership Studies at Western University, Canada. Her research reflects broad interests in education policy analysis and multi-scalar governance. She engages qualitative approaches to research with a fascination for studying how actors assemble around policies and how policies are enacted through these assemblages.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.55 - Student learning behaviours in informal learning spaces; a research study
Successful students practice self-regulated learning, often choosing to learn in the library’s informal learning spaces. While these spaces are generally thought to be effective and supportive of learning, little is known about what students think of the informal learning environment and its relationship to their self-regulated learning practices. This poster will review the results of a recent study where 21 students, ranging from undergraduates to Masters and PhD students, were asked about their learning activities as they relate to specific informal learning spaces in a newly built, large academic library with a variety of informal learning spaces. During the semi-structured interviews, the students were shown photographs of informal learning spaces such as a quiet reading room, computer workstations, study carrels, large and small study tables, and workrooms. They were asked to consider how affordances in each space and various environmental aspects such as light, view, noise, level of activity would affect their learning. Students also commented on the rationale for their choice of a preferred learning space. The study shows that students definitely come to the library with learning goals in mind and purposely choose specific spaces that enable them to learn effectively and achieve their goals. In addition to presenting an overview of the research study and initial results, this poster will present examples of some of the spaces and comments from the students on their learning activities in those spaces.

The goal of the study is to discover what, if any, relationships exist between space design and the learning choices students make, to determine if there are better designs for learning. Participants will have an opportunity to reflect on the outcomes of the research and consider the relationships between design and intentional informal learning outcomes. Handouts will be available.

Presenters
SB

Susan Beatty

Susan Beatty is a Librarian at the Taylor Family Digital Library, University of Calgary. Her recent research is on the relationship between student learning behaviours and learning space design. Susan has presented at national and international conferences in Hong Kong, New Zealand, Ireland, Great Britain and the United States.

Additional Authors
JP

Jennifer Payne

Jennifer Payne is an MSc student in the Computational Media Design program at the University of Calgary. Her research focuses on physical visualization, i.e. representations of information that are tangible


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.56 - Examining the Effects of Living Status on Academic Performance: Residence Learning Communities
Residence learning communities (RLCs) refer to intentional groupings of students living together in residence with shared academic and non-academic interests (Goodsell Love, 2012). Despite the growing number of RLCs in Canada, the data describing their impact in the Canadian context are lacking. Although there are promising results regarding the effect of RLCs on undergraduate retention and graduation rates specifically in the United States (U.S), there remains a need for more rigorous research (Inkelas Kurotsuchi et al., 2008; Shapiro & Levine, 1999). Specifically, variables included in the U.S models are not relevant to Canada (e.g participant year of study, degree of faculty involvement).


The purpose of this research study is to determine if living in an RLC improves student academic performance compared to other living scenarios. To objectively address this question, a complete cohort of students at the University of Guelph will be followed from their admission to the succeeding 4-5 years of their undergraduate studies. Given that the 1st year of higher education is a transitional year that serves as a foundation for subsequent years, this study will largely focus on 1st year academic outcomes (Gall et al., 2000). Academic performance will be determined based on admission average, 1st year average by courses, 2nd year registration (retention), and year of graduation.

This poster will compare and contrast the common types of RLCs available to students in Ontario and provide data on their impact on student academic success at the University of Guelph. Results of this study can inform other Canadian institutions considering implementing or expanding RLCs, and may be used to promote change in undergraduate education.

Participants at the poster presentation will: become familiar with the study design implemented for this research; learn about the results of this study; and will discuss how this research may be of value to their institution to improve undergraduate education.




References
Gall, T.L., Evans, D.R., & Bellerose, S. (2000). Transition to First-Year University: Patterns of Change in Adjustment Across Life Domains and Time. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 19(4), 544-567.


Goodsell Love, A. (2012). The growth and current state of learning communities in higher education. New Directions for teaching and learning, 132, 5-18. Inkelas Kurotsuchi, K., Soldner, M., Longerbeam,S.D., & Brown Leonard, J. (2008). Differences in Student Outcomes by Types of Living-Learning Programs: The Development of an Empirical Typology. Research in Higher Education, 49(6), 495-512.


Shapiro, N.S., & Levine, J.H. (1999). Creating Learning Communities: A Practical Guide to Winning Support, Organizing for Change, and Implementing Programs. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Presenters
avatar for Justine Hobbins

Justine Hobbins

Justine Hobbins is a graduate student at the University of Guelph studying to complete her MSc degree in Human Health and Nutritional Sciences with a focus on SoTL research. With her SoTL background concurrent with a broad science background, she presents with a unique perspective to education research.
SJ

Shoshanah Jacobs

Dr. Shoshanah Jacobs is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of Guelph. Her research focuses on knowledge translation and transfer.
KR

Kerry Ritchie

Dr. Kerry Ritchie is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph. Her SoTL research focuses on strategies for teaching critical thinking and communication skills, with special attention given to novel methods for scaling these practices to suit large class sizes.

Additional Authors
ME

Mildred Eisenbach

University of Guelph


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.57 - Investigating Minute Papers to Assess Student Reasoning
Increasingly, undergraduate courses need to help students develop and apply 21st Century skills such as scientific reasoning and critical thinking. This shift requires assessments that are scalable to large numbers of students and that can measure the sophistication of students' thinking in diverse classes. Traditional assessments tend to focus more on students' knowledge of concepts or procedures. Furthermore, the effectiveness of courses is measured primarily by student evaluations of teaching, and there is evidence that additional proxy measures of meaningful student learning may be helpful in equitably evaluating the success of courses.
One-minute papers, also known as exit tickets, are a formative assessment strategy that asks students to respond to one or two short-answer prompts following an in-class lesson. Typically, the prompts ask students to identify a key take-home lesson and a question or confusion they have about the lesson. Students' responses help instructors gauge students' understanding and engagement in the class. There has been much effort to assess higher-order skills such as critical thinking and reasoning through coding students' written statements on online discussion forums. We investigate how coding one-minute papers for sophistication of reasoning might provide a useful proxy measure of aggregate student engagement and growth in critical thinking in a general-education physics class. In future work, we plan to investigate using automated methods to statistically code aggregate levels of scientific reasoning in large-enrollment classes.
You are invited to discuss these preliminary results, and more generally, how we may derive measures from formative assessments to gauge students’ development of higher-order skills across the curriculum.

Presenters
avatar for Carolyn Sealfon

Carolyn Sealfon

Carolyn D. Sealfon served as Associate Director of Science Education at Princeton University for four years, and as a physics professor at West Chester University for five years. In her quest to improve scientific literacy, she is currently spending a year teaching at an inner-city high-school. She received her PhD in theoretical astrophysics from the University of Pennsylvania and her BA in physics from Cornell University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.58 - Collaborative Testing in the University Classroom
Although testing is usually conceived of as an opportunity to assess what students know, it can also be seen as a learning opportunity for students, as it provides additional practice with the material to be learned. We aimed to establish the impact of two different types of tests (individual, collaborative) on student learning in the applied setting of a university statistics course. Collaborative testing (completing tests in pairs or small groups) has become an oft-recommended approach in post-secondary education settings (e.g., Gilley & Clarkston, 2014) under the assumption that it benefits learning and student engagement. Indeed, final grades in courses comprising collaborative testing are often higher than those in courses using individual testing. However, it remains unclear whether collaborative testing benefits long-term individual learning. That is, although grades on collaborative tests are often higher than those on individual tests, improved performance may not transfer beyond the collaborative activity. Thus, increased final grades in courses using collaborative testing would not reflect improved understanding by individual students, but would be inflated by test grades where many heads had worked together to solve a problem. We tested knowledge transfer after collaborative testing in a 3rd-year course. We compared performance on midterm exams following tutorial practice on course material through a) collaborative practice tests and b) individual practice tests. This was done using a cross-over design, such that students who completed collaborative tests before the first midterm completed individual tests before the second midterm, and vice versa. Our results indicated no clear benefit of collaborative testing to the long-term learning of individual students. Qualitative data indicated a mix of student opinion regarding the collaborative testing approach.

References

Gilley, B. H., & Clarkston, B. (2014). Collaborative testing: Evidence of learning in a controlled in-class study of undergraduate students. Research and Teaching, 43, 83-91.


Presenters
HP

Heather Poole

McMaster University
Heather Poole is a postdoctoral fellow at the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Heather's background is in experimental psychology. |

Additional Authors
GN

Geoff Norman

Geoff Norman is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics at McMaster University.
SW

Scott Watter

Scott Watter is a faculty member in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.59 - Are you typing your notes? Learning outcomes of transcribed versus summarized notes.
Note-taking is ubiquitous. Whether in a lecture, seminar or meeting, students write down the information they hear, for future reference or as study materials. With today’s technology, students are faced with note-taking choices: tablets, laptops, phones, or pen and paper. As a form of note-taking, laptop usage has become increasingly common in the classroom, as opposed to the old-fashioned handwritten method. Unfortunately, laptops offer more opportunities for distractions and multitasking, which can lead to lower encoding and retention of lecture material (Sana, Weston, & Cepeda, 2012).

There may be additional consequences to using laptops, aside from multitasking. Handwritten notes have been shown to increase memory retention and encoding of lecture information (Di Vesta & Gray, 1973). A vast amount of literature supports handwritten notes as a superior method of note-taking, in terms of learning new information, when compared to typed notes (Craik & Lockhart, 1972). The trend for using technology to take notes, however, will only increase with advancements in technological equipment.

The current study explores the relationship between verbatim transcription and learning. Using a short Introductory Psychology web module, we instructed participants to either transcribe the lecture, or to summarize the lecture information. These instructions were applicable to both handwritten and typed notes, and their lecture content knowledge was assessed via multiple-choice questions.

I am exploring the “why” behind note-taking differences, with hope of applying research findings in developing workshops and information sessions for students and instructors, to optimize their use of note-taking in the classroom, and empower them to seek the best learning practices for the constantly evolving 21st century classroom.

References
Craik, F. I., & Lockhart, R. S. (1972). Levels of processing: A framework for memory research. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 11(6), 671-684.

Di Vesta, F. J., & Gray, G. S. (1973). Listening and note taking: II. Immediate and delayed recall as functions of variations in thematic continuity, note taking, and length of listening-review intervals. Journal of Educational Psychology, 64(3), 278-287.

Sana, F., Weston, T., & Cepeda, N. J. (2012). Laptop multitasking hinders classroom learning for both users and nearby peers. Computers & Education, 62, 24-31.

Presenters
avatar for Irina Ghilic

Irina Ghilic

Irina Ghilic is a PhD student in the department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour at McMaster University, researching factors that affect student learning during lectures, such as note-taking modalities and beat gestures. Her hope is to work on bridging the gap between applied cognition in education research and teaching practices.

Additional Authors
DS

David Shore

Dr. David I. Shore is a faculty member in the department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour at McMaster University, and the director of the Multisensory Perception lab.
avatar for Joseph Kim

Joseph Kim

Associate Professor, McMaster University
Dr. Joe Kim is a faculty member in the department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour at McMaster University, teaches the MacIntroPsych courses and directs the Applied Cognition in Education lab.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.60 - More than Money: Supporting SoTL Scholars
What is needed to do more & better SoTL? This question challenges institutions, teaching centres, and individuals. Informed by conversations with faculty, the institutional culture, exemplars elsewhere, and a year to wrestle with this question highlighted familiar refrains of needed funding and surprising appendices (especially in those faculty conversations) of “then I would need ____”. Always practical, the comments spoke to needs for information, guidance, and connections they had experienced in disciplinary research development; the “crucial element” of research process support (Hum, Amundsen & Emmioglu, 2015). Seeking to empower faculty to address identified needs of connection, mentorship, and information needed to meet the principles of Felten (2013) and other SoTL theorists, Clusters for Enhancing Learning and Teaching were launched. Come by this poster to learn about our Clusters and the guiding theories, and share in the conversation (leave a note!) about what is needed to do more and better SoTL!



Presenters
avatar for Carolyn Hoessler

Carolyn Hoessler

Program and Curriculum Development Specialist, GMCTE at the University of Saskatchewan
Carolyn Hoessler (Program and Curriculum Specialist) is a program and curriculum development specialist with 8 years of educational development experience. Her areas of specialty and focus include supporting faculty with curricular innovation, assessment of program outcomes, program evaluation, assessment of student learning, SoTL, research methods, as well as graduate student teacher development. Her methodological background includes... Read More →


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.40 - Online Course Evaluation - A Tool for Effective Teaching
Course evaluations provide students an opportunity to give faculty student feedback on teaching effectiveness. In addition, faculty can, and should, use course evaluations to improve their teaching. Though there are techniques for doing so in productive ways. In 2014, the University at Buffalo (UB) transitioned from over 15 disparate systems to a university-wide online evaluation process. This poster will review the process for making this transition from the initial committee formed to consider this potential outcome, through identifying the core questions that promote developmental teaching effectiveness, to identifying a system to manage the administration and meet varying needs, to how the university encourages faculty to utilize course evaluation data to improve teaching. Initial feedback from several studies and follow-ups of progress will be presented, as well as adaptations of administrations. These studies will share important learnings suggesting best practices for faculty and departments to use and maximize online course evaluation product features to better evaluate courses and report back to faculty in a timely manner so that changes can be made in teaching practices. This poster will highlight the impact that online course evaluations can have on improving teaching, when used effectively. In addition, a short discussion on the culture of course evaluation at the campus-level will be included as it impacts not only response rates, but also for improving teaching and in promotion and tenure discourse. Participants will gain an understanding of the complexities of the uses of course evaluations from multiple stakeholder’s perspectives (including their influences and concerns). Finally, the poster will present effective ways of using course evaluations for improving teaching effectiveness based on theory and research (i.e., Davidovitch and Soen, 2006).

Presenters
MC

Monica Carter

Monica Carter works with the Communication, Engagement and Dissemination team in the University at Buffalo’s Center for Educational Innovation. She helps advance innovative teaching practice and improving student success by managing events and engages faculty and staff in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning by disseminating teaching expertise within UB.
CM

Cathleen Morreale

Cathleen Morreale, PhD focuses on assessment, course evaluation, curriculum and program development, experiential learning (including internships and service-learning), counseling and advising, assessment, and career development. She currently serves as a curriculum and evaluation specialist through the Center for Educational Innovation at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. |


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.41 - Scaffolding Project-based Learning through Professional Project Management Best Practices
This poster outlines professional project management strategies that instructors can use to support project-based learning (PBL).


PBL is a student-centered instructional strategy. Depending on the instructional context, a project can be initiated by an instructor, proposed by a group of students, or sponsored by an outside organization. Students collaborate on a project team (Alves et al., 2012). They co-plan their learning with the support of the instructor, leading to the creation of a final product that answers a driving question they have posed. The final product is presented to a public audience beyond a project team’s instructor and classroom peers. The formative assessment of learning is ongoing. Students monitor and regularly report on their individual and project team's progress which allows instructors to track student learning on an ongoing basis.


Designed by a certified project management professional, the poster highlights best practices related to planning projects, mitigating project risks, communicating with project stakeholders, managing/monitoring/modifying projects, and closing projects by focusing on lessons learned. Planning for ongoing assessment throughout all phases of the project lifecycle is emphasized. The PBL research shows that these elements are key to project success (Harmer and Stokes, 2014).


Attendees will: become familiar with the project management body of knowledge, including where to learn more; discuss concrete project management best practices that can scaffold student project work; identify the ways project management best practices can be integrated into their own teaching practice.


References


Alves, A. C., Mesquita, D., Moreira, F. and Fernandes, S. (2012). Teamwork in project-based learning: Engineering students’ perceptions of strengths and weaknesses. In Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Project Approaches in Engineering Education., pp. 23-32.


Harmer, N. and Stokes, A. (2014). The Benefits and Challenges of Project-based Learning: A Review of the Literature. Plymouth, UK: PedRIO/Plymouth University.

Presenters
DH

David Hutchison

David Hutchison, PhD, PMP is Director of the Centre for Digital Humanities, Brock University where he is also cross-appointed to the Department of Teacher Education. A 2015 recipient of the Brock University Chancellor’s Chair for Teaching Excellence, David is the author of six books that focus on education and teaching.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.42 - Impact of Co-Teaching on Professional Practice of Bachelor of Nursing Students
In higher education, co-teaching is not common place. In a professional program such as Nursing, it is a relatively new phenomenon that has emerged from a context relevant, integrated curriculum. As a new phenomenon, what impact does co-teaching have on student learning and the development of their professional practice? For the purpose of this study, co-teaching is defined as involving two instructors who collaboratively design, and simultaneously teach and assess student work within a semester. In this pedagogical relationship, instructors model a collaborative approach to teaching, similar to the collaborative approach observed in professional practice within health care settings.



This poster presentation will outline the background, findings, and implications of a two-year mixed-method research project that investigated co-teaching in a Nurse as Educator course at one western Canadian university’s undergraduate Nursing program. The course focused on having senior students explore the principles of teaching and learning in relation to their evolving nursing practice. The goal of the research was to explore the impact of co-teaching on nursing students’ learning and how this ultimately informs their understanding of their role as nurse educators in professional practice, as well as to further examine the benefits and challenges of co-teaching in higher education. Findings from the analysis of quantitative and qualitative data from three cohorts shed insight into the positive influence co-teaching is having on student learning and their future professional practice. Strengths and challenges associated with co-teaching will also be shared and recommendations will be offered for the practice of co-teaching in professional programs.


.

Presenters
JL

Jennifer Lock

Jennifer Lock is the Associate Dean of Teaching and Learning and specialization chair for the Learning Sciences in the Werklund School of Education at the University of Calgary. Her area of specialization is in Educational Technology.

Additional Authors
CF

Carla Ferreira

Carla Ferreira is an Instructor in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Calgary. She holds a Master’s degree in nursing with a focus on nursing education.
JR

Jacqueline Rainsbury

Jacqueline Rainsbury is a research consultant and evaluator with international experience in health services research, evidence-based medicine, and public health. She has over 20 years of experience in research and teaching for the federal and provincial government, UK and Canadian universities, medical governing bodies, and non-profit organizations.
PR

Patricia Rosenau

Patricia Rosenau is a Senior Instructor and past Associate Dean of Teaching and Learning in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Calgary. Pat’s research is focused on reflective practice and peer mentorship in nursing education.
TC

Tracy Clancy

Tracey Clancy is an Instructor in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Calgary. As chair of the Community of Scholarship in Teaching & Learning in the Faculty of Nursing, Tracey has a vested interest in cultivating an understanding of collaborative teaching practice or team teaching, as this instructional approach aligns with the integrated curriculum embraced within the Faculty of Nursing.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.43 - Best Practices in Learning Outcome Development- Creating specific, informed learning outcomes for an established graduate program
As described by Kuh and colleagues (2005) establishing clear pathways to success is an important factor in creating effective learning environments, and specific learning outcomes can guide and empower students along this pathway. Learning outcomes provide tangible goals for students to work towards and can be applied at a lesson, course, academic program or institution level. Following the implementation of the Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) by the government of Ontario in 2010, the development of learning outcomes has become an important goal for post-secondary institutions to guide student learning and faculty teaching practices. The Master in Biomedical Science (MBS) Program at the University of Guelph is a unique 3-semester course-based graduate program, which enables students with diverse backgrounds in biological science to conduct traditional and non-traditional laboratory-based research in differing areas within the sciences. Through review of current best practices in learning outcome development, alignment to institution-level outcomes and consultation with students, faculty and program graduates, learning outcomes are currently being developed for the MBS program. This poster presentation will contextualize the importance of learning outcomes within the institutional QAF for Ontario and demonstrate the methodology required to create these outcomes. A summary handout of key ideas will be provided for future reference.

To this end, by engaging with this poster participants will be able to:
  • Recognize the importance and role of learning outcomes in the Ontario Post-Secondary context
  • Summarize best practices in learning outcome development
  • Explain the concept of constructive alignment
  • Evaluate the quality of written learning outcomes
  • Begin constructing learning outcomes for their own programs, courses and lessons


Presenters
TB

Tayler Bailey

Current Master of Biomedical Science (MBS) student in the department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Guelph. Graduate work focus is on teaching and learning in higher education. Graduated with a Bachelor of Science (Honours, Bio-Medical Science) in June 2015 from the University of Guelph.

Additional Authors
KR

Kerry Ritchie

Dr. Kerry Ritchie is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Guelph. Her SoTL research focuses on strategies for teaching critical thinking and communication skills, with special attention given to novel methods for scaling these practices to suit large class sizes.
LR

Lisa Robertson

Assistant Professor in the department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Guelph.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.44 - Exploratory Research on Themes found within Student Learning Portfolios developed during a First Year Undergraduate Business Course
Student Learning Portfolios (LPs) take many forms, depending on purpose and individual or programmatic design. This study suggests a simple LP model predicated on three fundamental components: 1) Reflection 2) Documentation and 3) Collaboration/Mentoring. Such an approach parallels successful models for professional teaching, course and administrative portfolios, and more specifically, the focus of this research, individual student portfolios (Jenson, 2011). LPs are beneficial in fostering deeper student learning and aiding skill development (Miller & Morgaine, 2009). A related concept referred to as metacognition (Bransford, Brown & Cocking, 2000) points to the positive impact of having an “internal conversation”, more specifically, an enhancement of student achievement and development in students’ ability to learn independently. The purpose of this exploratory research was to uncover themes within LPs written by 600 students in a mandatory first year Organizational Behavior course within an undergraduate business program. In their LPs, students reflected on their core competency building in the areas of stress management, time management and change management. While current research has shown that LPs foster deeper learning for students, this study goes one step further by suggesting even greater depth can be achieved by initiating LPs in first year, thus setting the baseline for further LP development and critical thinking during the years that follow. Early exposure to LP preparation allows for gradual learning of how to reflect and make progress on identified developmental areas, which ultimately fosters better awareness and understanding. Examples of baseline LP templates are provided along with how they integrate into the scaffolding of courses over a four-year program. Findings from qualitative data analyses provide a better understanding of issues being confronted by the sample of undergraduate business students, and with these challenges in mind, inform instructors on how to lay the necessary groundwork of critical leadership competency building going forward.

Presenters
TM

Teal McAteer

Dr. McAteer is an Associate Professor at the DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University. She teaches courses in organizational behaviour, human resource management, leadership, strategic change, and business ethics. She is also an independent business consultant who specializes in the areas of strategic human resource management, leadership coaching, career management, change, stress and time management, health and wellness.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.45 - Team-based learning: An application of constructivist learning theory in healthcare education.
Education requires students to develop critical thinking and effective team-work abilities. In constructivist learning theory the teacher is a guide to facilitate learning and learning should be active using relevant problems and group interaction. Teaching involves providing opportunities to expose inconsistencies between current understandings and new experiences therefore developing new mental schemes. Team-based learning (TBL) is a method that provides this opportunity.1


Research has shown positive outcomes with TBL including the development of critical thinking skills, team work enhancement, and increased quality of in class discussion and optimal learning outcomes.2 There is a significant increase in the students’ estimation of their “understanding of the principles of group work” over time. Studies have shown that TBL improves student performance on assessments especially for the academically weaker students.3


In TBL large classes taught by a single instructor are divided into teams. The instructor sets the learning objectives and designs the course into modules to address each objective. The modules consist of three phases. The first phase involves a prior learning assignment where the students study background material a week before of the learning session. In the second phase the students take a test as individuals and then again in their team using an Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT). The IF-AT is a scratch card that contains the correct answer for each question. Outstanding misconceptions around the factual content are then addressed. In the third phase of the process the students work in the teams to solve problems with multiple solutions that allow for debate of the correct answer. The instructor facilitates the discussion between teams as they debate.4


Conference participants will interact with the presenter who has used TBL in 8 offerings. Attendees will be able to recognize the components of TBL and appraise the method for usefulness in their own context.




  1. Hrynchak P., Batty H. (2012). The educational theory basis of team-based learning. Med Teach, 34 (10), 796-801.


  2. McInerney M.J., Fink L.D. (2003). Team-based learning enhances long-term retention and critical thinking in an undergraduate microbial physiology course. Microbiol Educ, 4, 3-12.


  3. Koles P.G., Stolfi A., Borges N.J., Nelson S., Parmelee D.X. (2010). The impact of team-based learning on medical students' academic performance. Acad Med, 85 (11), 1739-1745.


  4. Michaelsen L., Parmelee D., McMahon K., Levine R. (2008). Team-based learning for health professions education: A guide to using small groups to improving learning. Sterling Verginia: Stylus.



Presenters
PH

Patricia Hrynchak

Patricia Hrynchak is a clinical professor at the University of Waterloo, School of Optometry and Vision Science. She is an optometrist and holds a Master’s degree in Health Practitioner Teacher Education from the University of Toronto. She is the recipient of an Excellence in Science Teaching Award.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.46 - Curriculum Design: Findings and Best Practices from an Educational Intervention to Enhance Listening Skill Development of Clinicians
Listening and communication form a large part of every clinical and interprofessional encounter impacting clinical practice, the quality of health care, and client outcomes. Being able to listen mindfully, sensitively and with authentic intent enables clinicians to understand clients’ worldviews, needs, priorities, concerns and hopes; thus establishing a common ground that assists clients in making informed decisions and moving forward (King et al., 2012). Despite being a core competency across disciplines, there is a lack of training of these skills in University-level curricula.

We present research findings from a mixed-methods pilot study that focused on assessing the impact and procedures of a comprehensive listening skill educational intervention for service providers. We highlight the key features of the intervention that contributed to learning and share our work developing a listening curriculum for pre-service students. This innovative intervention exemplifies current best practices in knowledge mobilization, including multifaceted learning opportunities (e.g., self-evaluation, feedback on performance, interdisciplinary group discussion, simulation and experiential learning, self and guided critical reflection) to enhance listening skills.

Clinicians participated in: group observation and discussion of 6 inter-professional video simulations of clinical listening scenarios, 2 individual solution-focused coaching sessions on personal listening goals, and 3 live clinical simulations with standardized clients who were trained in giving feedback. The Effective Listening and Interactive Communication Scale (ELICS, King, et al., 2012) was administered pre- and post-intervention. The intervention was found to significantly impact participants’ listening behaviours. Participants described the intervention as an intense learning experience that resulted in immediate changes to their clinical and inter-professional practice.

Attendees will have an opportunity to assess their own listening behaviours and learn about how they can use the Complexity Rating Scale for Clinical Simulation Situations (King, et al., 2014) to determine the level of complexity of simulations they create for developing student learning.

References
King, G., Servais, M., Bolack, L., Shepherd, T., & Willoughby C. (2012). Development of a measure to assess effective listening and interactive communication skills in the delivery of children’s rehabilitation service. Disability and Rehabilitation, 34(6), 459-469. doi:10.3109/09638288.2011.608143

King, G., Shepherd, T. A., Servais, M., Willoughby, C., Bolack, L., Strachan, D., Moodie, S., Baldwin, P., Knickle, K., Parker, K., Savage, D., & McNaughton, N. (2014). Developing authentic clinical simulations for effective listening and communication in pediatric rehabilitation service delivery. Developmental Neurorehabilitation (Early online). doi: 10.3109/17518423.2014.989461

Presenters
MS

Michelle Servais

Michelle Servais, PhD, is a Researcher and Educator on Thames Valley Children’s Centre’s Quality Management Team who focuses on enhancing service delivery and the development of professional expertise. Michelle’s research interests include: knowledge exchange and mobilization, building research capacity, relationship-centred practice, interdisciplinary collaboration and learning, enhancing listening, and developing educational... Read More →

Additional Authors
CW

Colleen Willoughby

Thames Valley Children's Centre
DS

Debbie Strachan

Independent Consultants
DS

Diane Savage

Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
GK

Gillian King

Bloorview Research Institute | Western University | University of Toronto
KP

Kathryn Parker

Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
KK

Kerry Knickle

University of Toronto
LB

Linda Bolack

Independent Consultants
MP

Madhu Pinto

Bloorview Research Institute
NM

Nancy McNaughton

University of Toronto
PB

Patricia Baldwin

Thames Valley Children's Centre
SM

Sheila Moodie

Western University
TS

Tracy Shepherd

Thames Valley Children's Centre | Centralized Equipment Pool


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.47 - Fostering classroom communities through circling with teacher-candidates [CANCELLED]
Classroom circles have been recognized as a valuable pedagogical approach to develop K-12 students’ social emotional learning and to establish a sense of community within a classroom (Cefai et al., 2014). There has been little consideration that teachers, themselves, may benefit from circling experiences in order to reflect on their own professional and personal well-being, and to successfully implement circling practices in their classrooms (Boyes-Watson & Pranis, 2010). To garner a deeper understanding of circling use for teachers, this study examined teacher-candidates' experiences with circling in a teacher-education course. The online and in-person focus groups with former teacher-candidates procured three themes: a) learning through circling; b) navigating tensions, and c) establishing congruence. The results suggest that circling should be similarly used with educators, in addition to with K-12 students. The authors conclude with recommendations for practice, suggesting that circling pedagogies should be embedded in current teacher-education programming.

Inspired by these results, the authors also call on instructors of higher education courses to consider the value of circling in fostering supportive learning communities across multiple disciplines. Specifically, the authors propose that developing students’ social-emotional competencies, at all levels of education, alongside the more traditional academic learning goals, can promote inclusive classroom communities that help to facilitate learning. Visitors to this poster will leave with an understanding of the potential benefits of circling specifically for teachers and teacher-candidates, drawing from the results of this current study. Visitors will also be encouraged to reflect on how the practice and impact of circling (and developing students’ social-emotional competencies and promoting inclusive classrooms, more generally) relate to their own teaching/learning contexts.

Presenters
KB

Karen Bouchard

Karen Bouchard is a Ph.D. Candidate and Part-time Professor in the Teaching, Learning and Evaluation stream at the Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa. Her research and teaching interests focus on children’s social-emotional experiences at school, including teacher-student relationships and peer victimization within young people's friendships.

Additional Authors
TH

Trista Hollweck

Trista Hollweck is a Ph.D. student at the University of Ottawa in the department of Education, Teaching, Learning and Evaluation. She has been a school administrator, teacher leader, and school board consultant. She is actively engaged with and training others in Restorative Practice, Tribes, and Instructional Intelligence within the school and University setting.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.48 - Re-development of an upper-level electrodynamics course using evidence-based teaching methodologies
Electrodynamics is a fundamental subject in physics, but the combination of two features: students having to learn many key concepts, as well as to master the use of mathematical techniques in order to understand the applications, makes this course challenging both for the student and the instructor. We present a redesign of the learning environment in this challenging, upper-level Physics course using several evidence-based teaching methodologies such as constructive alignment, scaffolding of problem-solving, and active learning. Course outcomes indicate that these strategies enable deeper learning in all students. Instructors from all disciplines can adapt our methodologies into courses with multiple, high-level learning outcomes.

Presenters
CR

Chitra Rangan

Dr. Chitra Rangan is Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Windsor, and is one of the inaugural cohort of Teaching Leadership Chairs at the University. She chairs the Community of Practice named PEARL (Promoters of Experiential and Active, Research-based Learning), and is the recipient of the 2015 Canadian Association of Physicists' Medal for Excellence in Undergraduate Physics Teaching.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.61 - The Evolution of the Teaching Innovation Projects (TIPs) Journal
The Teaching Innovation Projects Journal (TIPS - http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/tips) is an open-access journal that publishes articles describing the scholarly and pedagogical foundations for instructor development workshops on a variety of topics in higher education. Each article is authored by a graduate student or post-doctoral fellow and includes comprehensive learning outcomes, annotated reviews of relevant literature, and detailed breakdowns of learning activities. Since the release of the inaugural issue in 2011, the 64 TIPS articles have been downloaded over 48,000 times by individuals across Canada and as far away as Brazil, Australia, and Germany. TIPS authors have been contacted directly by educators interested in mounting their proposed workshops at institutions around the globe. TIPS authorship invites graduate students and postdocs to discover the ways in which the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) can inform their personal teaching practice, and that of their discipline. Authors engage in the practice of educational development by distilling contemporary SOTL work into a coherent series of learning activities that can be shared with colleagues.


To ensure that the TIPS journal remains a relevant resource, its editors would like to engage the STLHE community in a conversation about the evolution of the journal. Through this interactive poster presentation, we will engage TIPS readers as well as past and potential contributors in brainstorming possible enhancements in the marketing, submission, and review processes. Those who participate in our poster presentation will 1) connect with editors interested in publishing evidence-based workshops on pedagogy, 2) review and offer suggestions for alternative article formats in order to better position TIPS to meet the future needs in higher education; and 3) receive an invitation to join the growing network of TIPS peer reviewers.

Presenters
avatar for Karyn Olsen

Karyn Olsen

Educational Developer, Teaching Support Centre
Karyn Olsen, Educational Developer, Teaching Support Centre, Western University.


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.62 - Graduate student learning: An empowering (side-) effect of a teaching inquiry grants program.
Linking directly to the TAGSA conference sub-topic, we are investigating the experiences of graduate student Research Assistants (RAs) involved in the SFU Teaching & Learning Development Grant program. The formal and ongoing evaluation of the grants program (Hum et al, 2015) provides various data about projects and allows us to follow-up on interesting (side-) effects, such as the experiences of graduate student RAs.

RAs associated with the grants program are of two ‘types’: those hired by faculty to work on a specific grant project, and those who are hired by our Institute to be part of the team that facilitates the grants program overall. With their differing disciplinary contexts and backgrounds, we are interested in how involvement in the grant program contributes to RAs’ professional and personal development.

This empirical research employs a mixed-methods approach. Data arise from two sources: questionnaire data from 30 RAs who worked on individual projects; and semi-structured interviews with eight RAs (four from the individual project, and four who worked with the Institute). Descriptive statistics are used to describe the quantitative data, and inductive analyses (Thomas, 2006) serve to determine themes in the qualitative comments from both data sets.

Preliminary findings from this research-in-progress indicate a variety of experiences, both positive and negative. In reporting these data we argue that, despite this mixed bag of experiences, involving students in research teams is important (Healey, Flint & Harrington, 2014), and is an effective way of providing experiential learning (Kolb, 1984) opportunities for developing and mentoring new researchers in the discipline of SoTL. In particular, we argue that such programs build graduate students’ capacity both in undertaking research in teaching & learning, and in their preparation as potential future faculty (McAlpine & Åkerlind, 2010). We also provide recommendations for how to support the RA experience.

Presenters
LD

Laura D'Amico

Research Associate, Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines, Simon Fraser University

Additional Authors
AM

Angela McLean

Angela McLean, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.
CA

Cheryl Amundsen

Cheryl Amundsen, Professor, Faculty of Education | Director, Institute for the Study of Teaching and Learning in the Disciplines | Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.
IP

Irina Presnyakova

Ph.D. Student, Linguistics, Simon Fraser University
OD

Odilia Dys-Steenbergen

Ph.D. Student, Social Psychology, Simon Fraser University


Wednesday June 22, 2016 16:45 - 18:00
Atrium, Physics & Astronomy Building Western University

16:45

POSTER.63 - Using a Blended Learning Approach to Build Capacity for Graduate Student Academic Literacies and Research Skills
With the steady increase in graduate student enrollments, there is a greater need to develop the research skills demanded in today’s academic and professional workplaces (Head et al., 2013). New graduate students often struggle with research study design, development of research questions, and the literature review (Hsiao & Yu, 2012). This poster describes how a collaborative group across three universities created a learning tool that blends independent online learning and integrated classroom activities to support student academic literacies (e.g. scholarly communication; online persona; academic integrity) and research skills (e.g. building research plans; evaluating information; citation and data management).

Student2Scholar, a set of ten interrelated learning objects, was initially created as a self-directed learning option accessed via the Ontario Online portal. During the project design phase, however, module developers shifted focus to address how content could be integrated within blended learning scenarios. Blended learning, commonly interpreted as a combination of face-to-face learning with online approaches, offers increased access to and flexibility of learning materials, and also provides opportunities for student learning to be independent, personalized, and sustainable (Graham, 2006).The idea of blending can also describe a way “to combine various pedagogical approaches (e.g., constructivism, behaviorism, cognitivism) to produce an optimal learning outcome with or without instructional technology” or to target skill-driven, attitude-driven, and competency-driven learning (Driscoll, 2002).

This poster will share blended learning approaches for supporting graduate student research capabilities using Student2Scholar. We invite your participation in two ways: 1) by using Dotmocracy to rank the academic literacies and research skills where you feel graduates need the most support and 2) by recording post-its of your ideas for face-to-face activities that will blend the online modules into existing structures/courses to support student learning.

Presenters
avatar for Colleen Burgess

Colleen Burgess

Research & Instructional Services Librarian, Western University
Colleen Burgess is a Research and Instructional Services Librarian at The D.B Weldon Library at the University of Western Ontario. Colleen serves as a board member for the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL) and as a former English Department Head at an international private school she has engaged with information literacy education over the last ten years.
CL

Cory Laverty

Dr. Cory Laverty is Teaching and Learning Specialist and Librarian at Queen’s University’s Centre for Teaching and Learning. Her research interests are in the development and assessment of information literacy curricula, learning support for faculty and librarians, and undergraduate student research. |
avatar for Christena McKillop

Christena McKillop

Director, Education Library, Western University
Christena McKillop is the Director of the Education Library at Western University. Christena is an academic librarian who actively supports graduate students at the Faculty of Education to learn how to effectively access research and academic resources for success in their programs and for their research.